17 found

Year:

  1.  6
    Multispecies Cities: Solarpunk Urban Futures.Heather Alberro - 2022 - Utopian Studies 33 (1):162-167.
    How to conjure up a picture, for instance, of a town without pigeons, without any trees or gardens, where you never hear the beat of wings or the rustle of leaves—a thoroughly negative place in short?Though now home to the majority of the world's human population, cities—indeed the politics of life itself—have always been multispecies endeavors. The quote above is Albert Camus's description of Oran, the fictional town that is the site of a devastating plague outbreak in his seminal work, (...)
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  2.  4
    Navigating Uncertainty: The Ambiguous Utopias of Le Guin, Gorodischer, and Jemisin.Jason A. Bartles - 2022 - Utopian Studies 33 (1):107-126.
    ABSTRACT The phrase “ambiguous utopia” was coined by Ursula K. Le Guin in the subtitle of her novel, The Dispossessed: An Ambiguous Utopia. That work appeared when utopian narratives had been displaced by dystopian imaginaries. This article embarks on a comparative analysis of three short stories: Ursula K. Le Guin’s “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas”, Angélica Gorodischer’s “Of Navigators”, and N. K. Jemisin’s “The Ones Who Stay and Fight”. Each author installs ambiguity at the center of their open-ended (...)
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  3.  1
    Utopian and Dystopian Themes in Tolkien’s Legendarium.Chris Lynch Becherer - 2022 - Utopian Studies 33 (1):187-190.
    Mark Doyle's Utopian and Dystopian Themes in Tolkien's Legendarium reads Tolkien's work through the history of utopian and dystopian thought. The aim of this new study is not to prove that Tolkien set out to write dystopian fiction or create a blueprint for a utopian society, but that utopian and dystopian societies and settings crucially inform his legendarium. By placing his study outside of its usual fantasy context, Doyle gives us a valuable societally focused and historicized contribution to both Tolkien (...)
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  4.  2
    Becoming Utopian: The Culture and Politics of Radical Transformation.Samuel Fassbinder - 2022 - Utopian Studies 33 (1):172-178.
    Tom Moylan is perhaps most famous as a literary critic of science fiction: his two most well-known collections of reviews were Demand the Impossible, published in 1986 and reissued in 2014 with a number of critical reactions appended, and Scraps of the Untainted Sky, originally published in 2000. At any rate, the topic with Becoming Utopian is utopia, utopia as an abstract notion, influenced by the writings of Ernst Bloch, Ruth Levitas, Fredric Jameson, and science fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson. (...)
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  5.  2
    The Racial Horizon of Utopia: Unthinking the Future of Race in Late Twentieth-Century American Utopian Novels.Julie A. Fiorelli - 2022 - Utopian Studies 33 (1):183-186.
    At the time of its publication in 2016, Edward K. Chan's The Racial Horizon of Utopia entered a field that included relatively few full-length studies of race in speculative fiction or science fiction, and even fewer of race in utopian literature. Ground-breaking in that respect and offering a compelling examination of race within utopian novels of the 1970s through 1990s, Chan's book makes a vital contribution to the field of utopian studies.Chan notes a shift in focus in post-1970s utopian fiction (...)
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  6.  2
    Disrupting the Present and Opening the Future: Extinction Rebellion, Fridays For Future, and the Disruptive Utopian Method.Anna Friberg - 2022 - Utopian Studies 33 (1):1-17.
    ABSTRACT This article examines the temporal rhetoric of Extinction Rebellion and Fridays For Future to discuss how the new generation of climate movement organizations offers ideas of an open future that can be acted upon. Research has shown how climate organizations create economic and social disruptions. However, as the article shows, they also create temporal disruptions. Taking theoretical inspiration from critical utopian studies, the article states that the climate activists should be understood as utilizing a disruptive utopian method that aims (...)
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  7.  3
    Dystopian/Utopian Theatre in Britain After 2000 and Its Political Spaces, Zentrum Für Interdisziplinäre Forschung / Centre for Interdisciplinary Research (ZiF), University of Bielefeld, March 11–13, 2021. [REVIEW]Dennis Henneböhl & Luciana Tamas - 2022 - Utopian Studies 33 (1):192-200.
  8. Dystopian/Utopian Theatre in Britain After 2000 and Its Political Spaces, Zentrum Für Interdisziplinäre Forschung.Dennis Henneböhl & Luciana Tamas - 2022 - Utopian Studies 33 (1):191-200.
    Although utopian and dystopian elements are a prominent characteristic of twenty-first-century British plays, there is still a significant research gap on these works, as the conference's organizers, Merle Tönnies and Eckart Voigts, pointed out in their introductory remarks. Bringing together drama and theatre studies, cultural studies, and political sciences/sociology, Tönnies and Voigts agreed to convene a conference to address this topic in an interdisciplinary and comprehensive manner. It was originally intended to take place at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research at (...)
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  9.  7
    Conceptions of Utopia in Modern Liberal Thought: Is There a Liberal Utopia?Mikayla Novak - 2022 - Utopian Studies 33 (1):144-160.
    ABSTRACT This article considers the relationship between modern classical liberalism and utopian theory. The main question we address is: How have key liberal theorists over the past century received utopian visions of the economy, politics, and society? The development of liberalism is commonly associated with strident anti-utopianism, a perception contraindicated by more recent developments in political economy and philosophy. Accommodative liberal engagements with utopia are evident within philosophical discussions addressing the significance of group diversity within free societies, and of maintaining (...)
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  10.  1
    Becoming Utopian: The Culture and Politics of Radical Transformation.Diana Palardy - 2022 - Utopian Studies 33 (1):168-171.
    What does it mean to become utopian? In the midst of a global pandemic, civil unrest, and the effects of climate change, this question is more relevant than ever. While Tom Moylan agrees with Fredric Jameson that there has been a "weakening of utopian muscularity", in his magnus opus Becoming Utopian: The Culture and Politics of Radical Transformation, he endeavors to remedy this problem, as each chapter advances his core belief in utopianism. A common thread woven throughout the book is (...)
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  11.  1
    Science and Technology in Russian Cosmic Utopias From the Beginning of the Twentieth Century: Konstantin Tsiolkovsky and Alexander Bogdanov.Marcin Pomarański - 2022 - Utopian Studies 33 (1):36-53.
    ABSTRACT The beginning of the twentieth century was a period of an intense development of technological utopia. The advancement of the natural sciences at that time provided scholars and thinkers with a new perspective and a better tool for getting to know the universe. Thanks to this, utopian visions created at that time were more daring and ambitious than their predecessors. It is no coincidence that the first cosmic utopias were created at this time, positioning ideal communities outside the earth. (...)
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  12.  7
    The Neoliberal Utopianism of Bitcoin and Modern Monetary Theory.John Mark Robison - 2022 - Utopian Studies 33 (1):127-143.
    ABSTRACT Advocates of Bitcoin and Modern Monetary Theory present their ideas as radical utopian alternatives to the neoliberal dominant, but these claims neglect the utopian strain in neoliberal monetary theory itself. This strain manifests in that theory’s faith in the capacity of markets to perfect human society. Bitcoin and Modern Monetary Theory express this same faith. After a brief survey of the older, more radical money utopias of More and Proudhon, this article traces the origins of Bitcoin and MMT in (...)
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  13.  10
    Guns and Gender Roles in Dystopian Settings.Francis Shor - 2022 - Utopian Studies 33 (1):76-89.
    ABSTRACT Dystopian settings are often dominated by fear and despair. As instruments and symbols of fear, guns, especially deployed in gendered ways, reinforce the dystopian setting. This article explores how guns and gender roles are represented in three dystopian novels and three dystopian films. Examining how phallocentric aggression and toxic masculinity shape how guns are wielded by a number of characters in several of these films and novels, the article also suggests how critical dystopias offer insights into the conditions that (...)
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  14.  3
    Developing a Utopian Model of Human-Technology Interaction: Collective Intelligence Applications in Support of Future Well-Being.Nathan N. Soch, Michael Hogan, Owen Harney, Michelle Hanlon, Catherine Brady & Liam McGrattan - 2022 - Utopian Studies 33 (1):54-75.
    ABSTRACT Human-technology interactions are omnipresent in daily life, a reality that must be faced to enact positive change without uprooting the technological systems that have come to define us. The present study develops a collective intelligence model for human-technology interaction design that aims to promote peace, prosperity, and happiness through design intentionality informed by utopian targets of radical improvement in society. Participants generated ideas, clarified and consolidated them, and then developed an interpretive structure model of the most important affordances identified (...)
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  15. Insistent Hope as Anti-Anti-Utopian Politics in N. K. Jemisin’s Broken Earth Trilogy.Mark A. Tabone - 2022 - Utopian Studies 33 (1):18-35.
    ABSTRACT This article discusses the politics of hope in N. K. Jemisin’s Broken Earth trilogy. Drawing on scholarship in utopian studies, science fiction studies, and Africana studies, it discusses the ways in which Jemisin uses two intentional community experiments depicted in the trilogy as “critical utopias” in order to work through problems involved in collective living, including the potentially anti-utopian aspects of these communities’ shortcomings. Ultimately, despite the apocalyptic setting that has attracted the most attention from critics, this article argues (...)
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  16.  4
    Warning Through Extrapolation: On the Practical Aims of Dystopia.Mathias Thaler - 2022 - Utopian Studies 33 (1):90-106.
    ABSTRACT This article contributes to a better understanding of dystopia’s practical aims by offering a critical defense of what Gregory Claeys calls the “Atwood Principle.” Derived from the writings of Canadian author Margaret Atwood, it establishes a yardstick for separating speculative fiction from science fiction. I argue that, rather than elevating it to the status of a genre definer, the Atwood Principle should be vindicated in terms of a heuristic device for contextually identifying the central mechanism underpinning dystopias: warning through (...)
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  17.  2
    Feminist Antifascism: Counterpublics of the Common.Tim Waterman - 2022 - Utopian Studies 33 (1):179-182.
    Philosopher Ewa Majewska's impressive new book aims at nothing less than changing the structures of thinking and feeling that shore up the liberal vision and practice of the public sphere. This structural shift is proposed to resist and ultimately block the rise of contemporary fascism. This seems brave and immense but because Majewska's methods are not revolutionary but rather rest in the quotidian, it comes to be seen as credible. It is, of course, a necessary goal, so it is reassuring (...)
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