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  1.  5
    Critique as Social Practice: Critical Theory and Social Self‐Understanding by Robin Celikates, Translated by Naomi van Steebergen Rowman & Littlefield [Essex Studies in Contemporary Critical Theory], 2018, 223 Pp. ISBN: 9781786604637 Pbk. £24.95. [REVIEW]Isabelle Aubert - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):271-274.
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  2.  5
    Analysis and Transcendence in The Sovereignty of Good.David Bakhurst - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):214-223.
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  3.  10
    Ontological Difference, Anthropological Difference, and Equal Liberty.Étienne Balibar - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):3-14.
    European Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  4.  23
    By Christopher Peacocke the Primacy of Metaphysics. Oxford University Press, 2019, Isbn 978‐0‐19‐883557‐8. 218 Pp. $39.95. [REVIEW]Jacob Beck - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):266-270.
  5.  24
    Expanding Transformative Experience.Havi Carel & Ian James Kidd - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):199-213.
    We develop a broader, more fine-grained taxonomy of forms of ‘transformative experience’ inspired by the work of L.A. Paul. Our vulnerability to such experiences arises, we argue, due to the vulnerability, dependence, and affliction intrinsic to the human condition. We use this trio to distinguish a variety of positively, negatively, and ambivalently valenced forms of epistemically and/or personally transformative experiences. Moreover, we argue that many transformative experiences can arise gradually and cumulatively, unfolding over the course of longer periods of time.
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  6.  11
    The Role of Imagination in Cognition: On Horstmann's Expansive Reading of Kant. Kant's Power of Imagination, by Rolf‐Peter Horstmann. Cambridge University Press, 2018, 110pp. ISBN: 978‐1108464031 £15.00. [REVIEW]Yoon Choi - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):248-257.
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  7.  39
    Getting the Measure of Murdoch's Good.Clare Mac Cumhaill - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):235-247.
    I offer a reading of Murdoch's conception of concrete universality as it appears in 'The Idea of Perfection', the first essay in the Sovereignty of Good. I show that it has British Idealist overtones that are inflected by Wittgenstein, a thought I try to illuminate by drawing an analogy with Wittgenstein's discussion of the metre stick in Paris in Philosophical Investigations §50. In the last part of the paper, I appeal to the work of Murdoch's erstwhile tutor Donald MacKinnon to (...)
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  8.  19
    Negative Freedom or Integrated Domination? Adorno Versus Honneth.Naveh Frumer - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):126-141.
    European Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  9.  29
    Diachronic Agency and Practical Entitlement.Matthew Heeney - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):177-198.
    As diachronic agents, we deliberate and decide in the present to perform future courses of action. Such future‐directed decisions normally enjoy a distinctive species of rational authority over subsequent thought and action. But what is the nature of this authority, and what underwrites its normative force? In this paper, I argue that our answer to this question must begin by situating future‐directed deciding within an intrapersonal model of cross‐temporal influence. The role of future‐directed deciding (and intending), then, is not to (...)
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  10.  6
    Descartes's Fictions: Reading Philosophy with Poetics, Emma Gilby. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019, X + 226 Pp., £55.00, ISBN: 978‐0‐19‐883189‐1. [REVIEW]Susan James - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):263-265.
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  11.  20
    “Love is Only Between Living Beings Who Are Equal in Power”: On What is Alive (and What is Dead) in Hegel's Account of Marriage.Gal Katz - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):93-109.
    The paper develops a conception of marital love as a complex recognitive relation, which I articulate by juxtaposing it against other recognitive relations that figure in Hegel's theory of modern civil society (i.e., respect and esteem). Drawing on Hegel's early writings, I argue that, if love is to provide its unique sort of recognition, it must obtain between “living beings who are equal in power”—a peculiar form of equality that I name (drawing on Stanley Cavell's work) “dynamic equality.” I conclude (...)
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  12.  51
    Phenomenological Reduction in Merleau‐Ponty's The Structure of Behavior : An Alternative Approach to the Naturalization of Phenomenology.Hayden Kee - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):15-32.
    Approaches to the naturalization of phenomenology usually understand naturalization as a matter of rendering continuous the methods, epistemologies, and ontologies of phenomenological and natural scientific inquiry. Presupposed in this statement of the problematic, however, is that there is an original discontinuity, a rupture between phenomenology and the natural sciences that must be remedied. I propose that this way of thinking about the issue is rooted in a simplistic understanding of the phenomenological reduction that entails certain assumptions about the subject matter (...)
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  13.  53
    Fellow Creatures, by Christine Korsgaard. Oxford University Press, 2018. ISBN 0198753853. 272 Pp. $24.95. [REVIEW]Colin McLear - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):258-262.
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  14.  32
    The Epistemic Limits of Shared Reasons.Alexander Motchoulski - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):164-176.
    European Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  15.  26
    The Puzzle of Philosophical Testimony.Chris Ranalli - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):142-163.
    An epistemologist tells you that knowledge is more than justified true belief. You trust them and thus come to believe this on the basis of their testimony. Did you thereby come to know that this view is correct? Intuitively, there is something intellectually wrong with forming philosophical beliefs on the basis of testimony, and yet it's hard to see why philosophy should be significantly epistemically different from other areas of inquiry in a way that would fully prohibit belief by testimony. (...)
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  16. Wittgensteinian content‐externalism.Ben Sorgiovanni - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):110-125.
    Content-externalism is the view that a subject’s relations to a context can play a role in individuating the content of her mental states. According to social content-externalists, relations to a socio-linguistic context can play a fundamental individuating role. Åsa Wikforss has suggested that ‘social externalism depends on the assumption that individuals have an incomplete grasp of their own concepts’ (Wikforss 2004, p. 287). In this paper, I show that this isn’t so. I develop and defend an argument for social content-externalism (...)
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  17.  24
    From Humility to Envy: Q Uestioning the Usefulness of Sad Passions as a Means Towards Virtue in Spinoza's Ethics.Sanem Soyarslan - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):33-47.
    In the Ethics Spinoza defines certain traditional virtues such as humility and repentance as species of sadness and denies that they are virtues. He nonetheless holds that they can turn out to be useful as a means towards virtue—in fact, the greatest virtue of blessedness—in the life of someone who is not guided by reason. In this paper, I examine Spinoza’s relatively overlooked claim regarding the usefulness of sad passions as a means towards blessedness. In taking up Spinoza’s treatment of (...)
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  18.  27
    Kantian Constructivism and the Authority of Others.Aleksy Tarasenko‐Struc - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):77-92.
    European Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  19.  8
    What If the Private Linguist Were a Poet? Iris Murdoch on Privacy and Ethics.Rachael Wiseman - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):224-234.
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  20.  36
    Valuing Animals as They Are—Whether They Feel It or Not.C. E. Abbate - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy:1-19.
    Dressing up animals in ridiculous costumes, shaming dogs on the internet, playing Big Buck Hunter at the local tavern, feeding vegan food to cats, and producing and consuming “knockout” animals, what, if anything, do these acts have in common? In this article, I develop two respect-based arguments that explain how these acts are morally problematic, even though they might not always, if ever, affect the experiential welfare of animals. While these acts are not ordinary wrongs, they are animal dignitary wrongs.
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  21.  80
    Frege on the Generality of Logical Laws.Jim Hutchinson - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy:1-18.
    Frege claims that the laws of logic are characterized by their “generality,” but it is hard to see how this could identify a special feature of those laws. I argue that we must understand this talk of generality in normative terms, but that what Frege says provides a normative demarcation of the logical laws only once we connect it with his thinking about truth and science. He means to be identifying the laws of logic as those that appear in every (...)
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