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  1. Biomarkers for PTSD Susceptibility and Resilience, Ethical Issues.Katherine C. Bassil, Bart P. F. Rutten & Dorothee Horstkötter - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):122-124.
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  2. Neuroethics and the Naturalistic Fallacy.Abram L. Brummett - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):124-126.
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  3. A Global Vision for Neuroethics Needs More Social Justice: Brain Imaging, Chronic Pain, and Population Health Inequalities.Daniel Z. Buchman & Sapna Wadhawan - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):130-132.
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  4. Social Impact Under Severe Uncertainty: The Role of Neuroethicists at the Intersection of Neuroscience, AI, Ethics, and Policymaking.Kristine Bærøe & Torbjørn Gundersen - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):117-119.
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  5. Scientific Practice and the Moral Task of Neurophilosophy.Christian Carrozzo - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):115-117.
  6. Brain Models in a Dish: Ethical Issues in Developing Brain Organoids.Audrey R. Chapman - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):113-115.
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  7. Fanon’s Police Inspector.Ann E. Fink - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):137-144.
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  8. Neuroethics of the Nonhuman.L. Syd M. Johnson - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):111-113.
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  9. Neuroethics at 15: Keep the Kant but Add More Bacon.Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz, Peter Zuk, Stacey Pereira, Kristin Kostick, Laura Torgerson, Demetrio Sierra-Mercado, Mary Majumder, J. Blumenthal-Barby, Eric A. Storch, Wayne K. Goodman & Amy L. McGuire - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):97-100.
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  10. The Future of Neuroethics and the Relevance of the Law.Sjors Ligthart, Thomas Douglas, Christoph Bublitz & Gerben Meynen - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):120-121.
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  11. Divergent Values and Adaptive Preferences: A Chinese Challenge?Daniel Lim - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):132-134.
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  12. It Is Time to Expand the Scope and Reach of Neuroethics.Patrick J. McDonald - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):128-129.
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  13. Erasing Trauma: Ethical Considerations to the Individual and Society.Tabitha E. H. Moses - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):145-147.
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  14. Do We Need Neuroethics?Eric Racine & Matthew Sample - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):101-103.
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  15. The Need for a Conceptual Expansion of Neuroethics.Arleen Salles, Kathinka Evers & Michele Farisco - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):126-128.
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  16. Ethical Contexts for the Future of Neuroethics.John R. Shook & James Giordano - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):134-136.
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  17.  6
    Ethical Perspectives on Neuromarketing: An Interview With Will Allred.John Banja - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (2):71-74.
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  18.  8
    The Shifting, Elusive, and Sometimes Contradictory Language of Disability—Insights From Keywords for Disability Studies.Sarah Blanton & Benjamin Reiss - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (2):88-90.
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  19.  7
    Disability Language and Our Momentary Preferences.Lennard Davis - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (2):93-94.
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  20.  8
    A Cross-Cultural Neuroethics View on the Language of Disability.Rosemarie Garland-Thomson - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (2):91-92.
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  21.  6
    Worlding Disability: Categorizations, Labels, and the Making of People.Barbara E. Gibson - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (2):85-87.
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  22.  7
    Disabling Language and the Nuances of Stigmatization.Andries Hiskes - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (2):94-96.
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  23.  5
    A Cross-Cultural Neuroethics View on the Language of Disability.Judy Illes & Hayami Lou - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (2):75-84.
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  24. Neuromarketing and AI—Powerful Together, but Needing Scrutiny.Paul Root Wolpe - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (2):69-70.
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  25.  6
    Select Interviews From the INS Annual Meeting—Keith Humphreys, Tom Insel, Uma Karmarkar, Carl Marci, Ariel Cascio, Winston Chiong, Frederic Gilbert, Cynthia Kubu, and Jonathan Pugh.Nathan Ahlgrim, Kristie Garza, Carlie Hoffman, Sarah Coolidge & Ryan H. Purcell - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):62-68.
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  26.  6
    “There Is No Man Living Who Isn’T Capable of Doing More Than He Thinks He Can Do” … With Cognitive Enhancement.Mark Henderson Arnold - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):54-56.
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  27.  10
    Can Attitudes Toward Genome Editing Better Inform Cognitive Enhancement Policy?Davide Battisti, Alessandra Gasparetto & Mario Picozzi - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):59-61.
    The article by Conrad et al. (AJOB Neuroscience, 2019, 10:1) does not take into account another, still hypothetical, procedure for cognitive enhancement (CE) which would be appropriate to consider in the surveys, i.e. the possibility to genetically enhance the cognitive abilities of a future individual using genome editing techniques. In this case, the conclusions of the article in the context of the “self-others difference” and “safety/naturalness” would be questioned. In fact, the results of the hypothetical surveys with the variant “genome (...)
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  28.  8
    Privacy Concerns in Brain–Computer Interfaces.Jan Christoph Bublitz - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):30-32.
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  29.  9
    Attitudes Toward Cognitive Enhancement: The Role of Metaphor and Context.Erin C. Conrad, Stacey Humphries & Anjan Chatterjee - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):35-47.
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  30.  13
    “Sounds Fine, But No Thanks!”: On Distinguishing Judgments About Action and Acceptability in Attitudes Toward Cognitive Enhancement.Florian Cova, Jordane Boudesseul & Anthony Lantian - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):57-59.
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  31.  7
    More Harm Than Good: Neurotechnological Thought Apprehension in Forensic Psychiatry.Mackenzie Graham & Phoebe Friesen - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):17-19.
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  32.  5
    Thought Apprehension: The “True” Self and The Risks of Mind Reading.Andrea Lavazza - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):19-21.
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  33.  6
    Neurotechnologies Cannot Seize Thoughts: A Call for Caution in Nomenclature.Katherine E. MacDuffie & Sara Goering - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):23-25.
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  34.  6
    The Last Refuge of Privacy.Melissa D. McCradden & James A. Anderson - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):25-28.
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  35.  2
    Five Criteria for Assessing the Implications of NTA Technology.Giulio Mecacci & Pim Haselager - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):21-23.
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  36.  8
    Ethical Issues to Consider Before Introducing Neurotechnological Thought Apprehension in Psychiatry.Gerben Meynen - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):5-14.
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  37.  48
    Enhancement, Authenticity, and Social Acceptance in the Age of Individualism.Nicolae Morar & Daniel R. Kelly - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):51-53.
    Public attitudes concerning cognitive enhancements are significant for a number of reasons. They tell us about how socially acceptable these emerging technologies are considered to be, but they also provide a window into the ethical reasons that are likely to get traction in the ongoing debates about them. We thus see Conrad et al’s project of empirically investigating the effect of metaphors and context in shaping attitudes about cognitive enhancements as both interesting and important. We sketch what we suspect is (...)
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  38.  9
    Consideration of Context and Meanings of Neuro-Cognitive Enhancement: The Importance of a Principled, Internationally Capable Neuroethics.John R. Shook & James Giordano - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):48-49.
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  39.  5
    Further Ethical Concerns for Neurotechnological Thought Apprehension in Medicine.Nathan Stout - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):28-29.
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  40.  10
    Cognitive Enhancement and Metaphor Choice as Moral Choice.Paul Tubig & Sierra Simmerman - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):50-51.
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  41.  5
    The Ethics of Counting Neural Activity as Proof.Annemarie van Stee & Marc Slors - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):15-16.
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  42.  9
    How Do We Conduct Fruitful Ethical Analysis of Speculative Neurotechnologies?Lucie White - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):1-4.
    Gerben Meynen (2019) invites us to consider the potential ethical implications of what he refers to as “thought apprehension” technology for psychiatric practice, that is, technologies that involve recording brain activity, and using this to infer what people are thinking (or intending, desiring, feeling, etc.). His article is wide-ranging, covering several different ethical principles, various situations psychiatrists might encounter in therapeutic, legal and correctional contexts, and a range of potential incarnations of this technology, some more speculative than others. Although Meynen’s (...)
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  43.  5
    Ethical Analysis of “Mind Reading” or “Neurotechnological Thought Apprehension”: Keeping Potential Limitations in Mind.Peter Zuk & Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):32-34.
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