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  1.  7
    Obviously You, Maybe You, Artificial You: Exploring the Impact of Artificial Intelligence Technologies on Consciousness and Personal Identity.John Banja - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (2):128-130.
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  2.  12
    Superethics Instead of Superintelligence: Know Thyself, and Apply Science Accordingly.Pim Haselager & Giulio Mecacci - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (2):113-119.
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  3.  1
    Artificial Intelligence in Clinical Neuroscience: Methodological and Ethical Challenges.Marcello Ienca & Karolina Ignatiadis - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (2):77-87.
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  4.  4
    Deep Fakes and Memory Malleability: False Memories in the Service of Fake News.Nadine Liv & Dov Greenbaum - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (2):96-104.
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  5.  2
    Artificial Intelligence in Service of Human Needs: Pragmatic First Steps Toward an Ethics for Semi-Autonomous Agents.Travis N. Rieder, Brian Hutler & Debra J. H. Mathews - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (2):120-127.
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  6.  3
    Anthropomorphism in AI.Arleen Salles, Kathinka Evers & Michele Farisco - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (2):88-95.
    AI research is growing rapidly raising various ethical issues related to safety, risks, and other effects widely discussed in the literature. We believe that in order to adequately address those issues and engage in a productive normative discussion it is necessary to examine key concepts and categories. One such category is anthropomorphism. It is a well-known fact that AI’s functionalities and innovations are often anthropomorphized. The general public’s anthropomorphic attitudes and some of their ethical consequences have been widely discussed in (...)
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  7.  3
    “Sorry I Didn’T Hear You.” The Ethics of Voice Computing and AI in High Risk Mental Health Populations.Christopher Villongco & Fazal Khan - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (2):105-112.
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  8.  3
    We Have Met AI, and It Is Not Us.Paul Root Wolpe - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (2):75-76.
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  9.  3
    Does Mental Discipline Partially Restore the Responsibility of BCI Users?Viktor Ivanković & Lovro Savic - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (1):67-70.
  10.  39
    The Narrative Coherence Standard and Child Patients' Capacity to Consent.Gah-Kai Leung - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (1):40-42.
    Aryeh Goldberg compellingly argues for a Narrative Coherence Standard (NCS) to bolster existing methods of assessing patients' mental capacity. But his account fails to distinguish between the cognitive abilities of children and adults; consequently, worries may be raised about the scope of the NCS, in particular when we consider child patients. In this article, I argue the NCS cannot plausibly apply to children. Since children's self-conception does not arrive fully formed — but rather is a product of both incomplete cognitive (...)
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  11.  3
    The Continuity of BCI-Mediated and Conventional Action.Daniel Lim - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (1):59-61.
  12.  45
    Applying the Narrative Coherence Standard in Non-Medical Assessments of Capacity.Tyler Gibb, Madison Irene Hybels & Khadijah Hussain - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (11):31-33.
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  13.  37
    BCI-Mediated Behavior, Moral Luck, and Punishment.Daniel J. Miller - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (11):72-74.
    An ongoing debate in the philosophy of action concerns the prevalence of moral luck: instances in which an agent’s moral responsibility is due, at least in part, to factors beyond his control. I point to a unique problem of moral luck for agents who depend upon Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) for bodily movement. BCIs may misrecognize a voluntarily formed distal intention (e.g., a plan to commit some illicit act in the future) as a control command to perform some overt behavior (...)
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