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  1.  10
    A Usage-Based Account of Subextraction Effects.Rui P. Chaves & Adriana King - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (4):719-750.
    The idea that conventionalized general knowledge – sometimes referred to as a frame – guides the perception and interpretation of the world around us has long permeated various branches of cognitive science, including psychology, linguistics, and artificial intelligence. In this paper we provide experimental evidence suggesting that frames also play a role in explaining certain long-distance dependency phenomena, as originally proposed by Deane. We focus on a constraint that restricts the extraction of an NP from another NP, called subextraction, which (...)
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  2.  4
    Seeing From Without, Seeing From Within: Aspectual Differences Between Spanish and Russian.Laura A. Janda & Antonio Fábregas - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (4):687-718.
    Journal Name: Cognitive Linguistics Issue: Ahead of print.
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  3.  5
    Chunking or Predicting – Frequency Information and Reduction in the Perception of Multi-Word Sequences.David Lorenz & David Tizón-Couto - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (4):751-784.
    Journal Name: Cognitive Linguistics Issue: Ahead of print.
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  4.  1
    Infant Single Words for Dynamic Events Predict Early Verb Meanings.Lorraine McCune & Ellen Herr-Israel - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (4):629-653.
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  5.  12
    Hands and Faces: The Expression of Modality in ZEI, Iranian Sign Language.Sara Siyavoshi - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (4):655-686.
    This paper presents a study of modality in Iranian Sign Language from a cognitive perspective, aimed at analyzing two linguistic channels: facial and manual. While facial markers and their grammatical functions have been studied in some sign languages, we have few detailed analyses of the facial channel in comparison with the manual channel in conveying modal concepts. This study focuses on the interaction between manual and facial markers. A description of manual modal signs is offered. Three facial markers and their (...)
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  6.  8
    Construal Vs. Redundancy: Russian Aspect in Context.Laura A. Janda & Robert J. Reynolds - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (3):467-497.
    The relationship between construal and redundancy has not been previously explored empirically. Russian aspect allows speakers to construe situations as either Perfective or Imperfective, but it is not clear to what extent aspect is determined by context and therefore redundant. We investigate the relationship between redundancy and open construal by surveying 501 native Russian speakers who rated the acceptability of both Perfective and Imperfective verb forms in complete extensive authentic contexts. We find that aspect is largely redundant in 81% of (...)
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  7.  5
    Processing Latencies of Competing Forms in Analogical Levelling as Evidence of Frequency Effects on Entrenchment in Ongoing Language Change.Anne Krause-Lerche - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (3):571-600.
    Journal Name: Cognitive Linguistics Issue: Ahead of print.
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  8.  8
    Effectiveness of Force Dynamic Explanations of English Causative Verbs and the Role of Imagery.Charles M. Mueller & Yasuhiro Tsushima - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (3):439-466.
    Journal Name: Cognitive Linguistics Issue: Ahead of print.
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  9.  5
    XL Burgers, Shiny Pizzas, and Ascending Drinks: Primary Metaphors and Conceptual Interaction in Fast Food Printed Advertising.Lorena Pérez-Hernández - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (3):531-570.
    Journal Name: Cognitive Linguistics Issue: Ahead of print.
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  10.  11
    Smoothly Moving Through Mental Spaces: Linguistic Patterns of Viewpoint Transfer in News Narratives.Kobie van Krieken & José Sanders - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (3):499-529.
    Journal Name: Cognitive Linguistics Issue: Ahead of print.
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  11.  10
    Semantic Similarity to High-Frequency Verbs Affects Syntactic Frame Selection.Eunkyung Yi, Jean-Pierre Koenig & Douglas Roland - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (3):601-628.
    Journal Name: Cognitive Linguistics Issue: Ahead of print.
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  12.  11
    Proximal and Distal Deictics and the Construal of Narrative Time.Barbara Dancygier - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (2):399-415.
    This paper proposes an approach to narrative deixis which offers a coherent analysis of the respective roles of proximal and distal deictic expressions. The paper starts by arguing that fictional narratives require an approach to deixis which modifies a number of broadly held assumptions, especially as regards the interaction between tense and other deictic forms. It then considers the widely discussed instance of the temporal adverb now in the context of Past Tense. The second part of the paper gives special (...)
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  13.  5
    Shared Spaces, Shared Mind: Connecting Past and Present Viewpoints in American Sign Language Narratives.Terry Janzen - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (2):253-279.
    In American Sign Language narratives, signers map conceptualized spaces onto actual spaces around them that can reflect physical, conceptual, and metaphorical relations among entities. Because verb tenses are not attested in ASL, a question arises: How does a signer distinguish utterances about past events from utterances within a present conversational context? In narratives, the story-teller’s past-event utterances move the story along; accompanying these will often be subjective comments on the story, evaluative statements, and the like, that are geared, in the (...)
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  14.  10
    Time, Tense and Viewpoint Shift Across Languages: A Multiple-Parallel-Text Approach to “Tense Shifting” in a Tenseless Language.Wei-lun Lu - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (2):377-397.
    The paper discusses the role of tense and time from a cross-linguistic perspective by comparing English and Mandarin. Multiple translations of the same literary piece are used to test the correspondence between the tense, the perfective aspect and temporal adverbials. In English, tense marking is found to work with at least two language-specific stylistic means, clause interpolation and inversion, to create a mixed narrative viewpoint. In Mandarin, neither the perfective aspect nor temporal adverbials, i.e., constructions that invoke time, are systematically (...)
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  15.  3
    Bridging the Gap Between the Near and the Far: Displacement and Representation.Arjan A. Nijk - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (2):327-350.
    This article discusses the use of proximal deictic expressions to designate distal entities, focusing on the use of the present tense to designate past events. Cognitive approaches to this issue assume that such usages presuppose a special conceptual construal, in which the spatio-temporal distance between the ground and the designated event space is bridged in some way. In this paper, I argue that there are two distinct ways in which this may be accomplished. One is through mentally displacing the ground (...)
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  16.  10
    Traveling Through Narrative Time: How Tense and Temporal Deixis Guide the Representation of Time and Viewpoint in News Narratives.José Sanders & Kobie van Krieken - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (2):281-304.
    This study examines the linguistic construal and cognitive representation of time and viewpoint in the genre of news narratives. We present a model of mental spaces that involves a News Space in which the deictic center is construed of the news actors at the time the newsworthy events took place, and a Reality Space in which the deictic here-and-now center of journalist and reader is construed. This model explains how the dynamic representation of narrative news discourse, characterized by shifts in (...)
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  17.  7
    Genre as a Factor Determining the Viewpoint-Marking Quality of Verb Tenses.Ninke Stukker - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (2):305-325.
    Verb tenses play an important role in managing deictic relations between the narrator, the audience and the events happening in the story world. Across languages, the Simple Past is considered the conventional story-telling tense, reflecting the prototypical deictic configuration of stories in which the narrator is positioned at some distance from the events unfolding in the story. The Simple Present, on the other hand, is considered a marked option for narration, assumed to automatically result in a shift to a subjective (...)
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  18.  12
    Linguistic and Cognitive Representation of Time and Viewpoint in Narrative Discourse.Kobie van Krieken, José Sanders & Eve Sweetser - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (2):243-251.
    In this introduction to the special issue on time and viewpoint in narrative discourse, we highlight the central contributions of the issue concerning the relation between the linguistic construal and cognitive representation of time and viewpoint. We explain how linguistic and gestural cues guide the representation of narrative time progression and argue that this representation involves various cognitive operations regulating the alignment between the viewpoints of narrator, addressee, and narrative characters. These operations are steered by a variety of linguistic phenomena, (...)
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  19.  5
    Shifting Tenses, Viewpoints, and the Nature of Narrative Communication.Arie Verhagen - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (2):351-375.
    This paper first develops a theoretically motivated view of narrative as a special form of inferential, cooperative human communication, of the role that the past tense plays in the intersubjective coordination of narrators and readers, viz. that of ‘curtailing’ the immediate argumentative applicability of the represented situation, and of its relation to viewpoint management. In three case studies, it is subsequently shown how this helps to elucidate certain effects of present and past tense alternations in stories. While these effects are (...)
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  20.  9
    Backwards Time: Causal Catachresis and its Influence on Viewpoint Flow.Douglass Virdee - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (2):417-438.
    This paper proposes a cognitive linguistic explanation of the unusual narrative construal of time as moving backwards. It shows that backwards time in narrative involves setting up an alternative space in which a second narrative is constructed simultaneously, resulting in a viewpoint hierarchy which postulates four viewpoints on each discourse statement. The paper draws together research on conceptual metaphor, mental spaces theory and viewpoint multiplicity, bringing it to bear on discourse fragments. The majority of these are taken from Martin Amis’s (...)
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  21.  4
    Concept Characteristics and Variation in Lexical Diversity in Two Dutch Dialect Areas.Karlien Franco, Dirk Geeraerts, Dirk Speelman & Roeland Van Hout - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (1):205-242.
    Lexical diversity, the amount of lexical variation shown by a particular concept, varies between concepts. For the concept drunk, for instance, nearly 3000 English expressions exist, including blitzed, intoxicated, and hammered. For the concept sober, however, a significantly smaller number of lexical items is available, like sober or abstinent. While earlier variation studies have revealed that meaning-related concept characteristics correlate with the amount of lexical variation, these studies were limited in scope, being restricted to one semantic field and to one (...)
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  22.  7
    The More Data, the Better: A Usage-Based Account of the English Comparative Correlative Construction.Thomas Hoffmann, Jakob Horsch & Thomas Brunner - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (1):1-36.
    Languages are complex systems that allow speakers to produce novel grammatical utterances. Yet, linguists differ as to how general and abstract they think the mental representation of speakers have to be to give rise to this grammatical creativity. In order to shed light on these questions, the present study looks at one specific construction type, English comparative correlatives, that turns out to be particularly interesting in this context: on the one hand it has been described in terms of one of (...)
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  23.  4
    Rethinking Agreement: Cognition-to-Form Mapping.Andrej A. Kibrik - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (1):37-83.
    The prevailing assumption is that an Research underlying this study was conducted with support of the Russian Foundation for Basic Research grant #17-06-00460.agreement feature originates in one linguistic element, that is a controller, and is copied onto another one, a target. This form-to-form approach encounters massive difficulties when confronted with data, such as missing controllers or feature mismatches. A cognition-to-form mapping approach is proposed instead, suggesting that agreement features, such as person, number, and gender, are associated with referents in the (...)
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  24.  8
    Lexico-Grammatical Alignment in Metaphor Construal.Jenny Lederer - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (1):165-203.
    This study concerns the distribution of metaphorical lexis in discrete syntactic constructions. Source and target seed language from established conceptual metaphors in economic discourse is used to catalogue the specific patterns of how metaphorical pairs align in five syntactic constructions: A-NP, N-N, NP-of-NP, V-NP, and X is Y. Utilizing the Corpus of Contemporary American English, the examination includes 12 frequent metaphorical target triggers combined with 84 source triggers to produce 2,016 ordered collocations, i.e. investment freeze and turbulent market. Through detailed (...)
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  25.  9
    Rise and Be Surprised: Aspectual Profiling and Mirativity in Odia Light Verb Constructions.Maarten Lemmens & Kalyanamalini Sahoo - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (1):123-164.
    In this paper, we present our Construction Grammar account of light verb constructions in the Indo-Aryan language Odia. These light verb constructions are asymmetric complex verb predicates that combine a main verb with a light verb. While the LVs are form-identical with a lexical verb, they are “light” because they have lost their lexical content as well as their argument structure. We argue that LV constructions present a coherent system: they all modulate the interpretation of the event encoded by the (...)
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  26.  10
    Pointing and Placing: Nominal Grounding in Argentine Sign Language.Rocío Martínez & Sherman Wilcox - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (1):85-121.
    Grounding refers to expressions that establish a connection between the ground and the content evoked by a nominal or finite clause. In this paper we report on two grammatical implementations of nominal grounding in Argentine Sign Language: pointing and placing. For pointing constructions, we also examine distal-proximal pointing and directive force. We introduce the concept of placing, in which a sign is produced at a specific meaningful location in space. Two types of placing are discussed: Placing-for-Creating, in which a new (...)
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