35 found

Year:

  1.  24
    'Law and Justice Among the Socratics: Contexts for Plato's Republic'.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2021 - Polis 38 (3):399-419.
    At the beginning of Republic 2 (358e–359b), Plato has Glaucon ascribe a social contract theory to Thrasymachus and ‘countless others’. This paper takes Glaucon’s description to refer both within the text to Thrasymachus’ views, and outside the text to a series of works, most of which have been lost, On Justice or On Law. It examines what is likely to be the earliest surviving work that presents a philosophical defence of law and justice against those who would prefer their opposites, (...)
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  2.  5
    Dangerous Counsel. Accountability and Advice in Ancient Greece, Written by Matthew Landauer.Cinzia Arruzza - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):336-339.
  3.  9
    The Rhetoric of the Past in Demosthenes and Aeschines: Oratory, History, and Politics in Classical Athens, Written by Guy Westwood.Matteo Barbato - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):355-357.
  4.  3
    Homer Revised? Echoes of the Behemoth in the Hobbesian Translations of the Iliad and Odyssey.Andrea Catanzaro - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):303-325.
    By moving on from the findings of literature concerning the connections between the Leviathan and the Hobbesian translations of the Homeric poems, this article aims to problematize these relationships further with regard to the Behemoth. Three principal issues will be taken into account – the prophecy, the ruling over the Militia, and the mixed monarchy – given that, although themes typical of the philosopher’s political thought, their peculiarities in the Behemoth enable us to draw attention to possible significant political connections (...)
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  5.  10
    Construire la Cité: Essai de Sociologie Historique Sur les Communautés de L’Archaïsme Grec., Written by Alain Duplouy.Eric Driscoll - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):327-331.
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  6.  7
    The Concept of Isēgoria.Alex Gottesman - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):175-198.
    This paper examines the concept of isēgoria. It looks especially at Herodotus, comparing his use of the term to that of other authors. The term does not primarily refer to ‘the equal right to speak in the assembly’. Rather, it is a ‘language ideology’ that characterizes the bearing of the free, full citizen. Isēgoria was a negative concept, defined by what it was not more than what it was: not flattery; not fearful; not indirect. Isēgoria could only exist in a (...)
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  7.  5
    Aristophanes and Politics. New Studies, Edited by Ralph M. Rosen and Helene P. Foley.Nikoletta Kanavou - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):340-345.
  8.  5
    Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2–322/1), Written by Peter Liddel.Danielle L. Kellogg - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):351-354.
  9.  2
    Is Protagoras’ Great Speech on Democracy?James Kierstead - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):199-207.
    The Great Speech of Protagoras in Plato’s dialogue is now widely seen as an expression of democratic theory, one of the earliest substantial expressions of democratic theory on record. At the same time, there have long been arguments to the contrary, the most formidable presentation of which is an article by Peter Nicholson that appeared in these pages in 1981. In this short piece, I address Nicholson’s skeptical arguments head-on and in full, in a way that has not yet been (...)
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  10.  5
    After the Crisis. Remembrance, Re-Anchoring and Recovery in Ancient Greece and Rome, Edited by Jacqueline Klooster and Inger N.I. Kuin. [REVIEW]Dominic Machado - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):363-366.
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  11.  8
    Calling Philosophers Names: On the Origin of a Discipline, Written by Christopher Moore.Richard P. Martin - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):346-350.
  12.  7
    Virtue, Knowledge, and Political Instability in Aristotle’s Politics: Lessons From the Eudemian Ethics.Benjamin Miller - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):261-276.
    I argue that we cannot fully understand Aristotle’s position on political stability and state preservation in the Politics with paying close attention to his Eudemian Ethics. We learn from considering the Politics and the Eudemian Ethics in concert that even ‘correct’ regimes are unstable when citizens do not possess full virtue. Aristotle introduces his formal account of the knowledge requirements for virtue in Eudemian Ethics 8.3, and he applies these knowledge requirements as an explanation for state decline in Politics 2.9 (...)
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  13.  4
    How to Be a Bad Emperor: An Ancient Guide to Truly Terrible Leaders, Written by Suetonius.Mallory Monaco Caterine - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):371-373.
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  14.  4
    Democratic Law in Classical Athens, Written by Michael Gagarin.Christine Plastow - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):332-335.
  15.  6
    How Lives Form Leaders: Plutarch’s Tripartite Theory of Leadership Education.Michael E. Promisel - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):277-302.
    Plutarch’s Parallel Lives was once considered a preeminent source of ethical and leadership instruction. But despite generations turning to the Lives for leadership education, we lack clarity concerning how the Lives cultivate leadership. In fact, Plutarch offers the key to this puzzle in a tripartite theory of leadership education evident throughout his corpus. Leaders should be educated through: 1) philosophical instruction, 2) experience in public life, or 3) literary synthesis – and, ideally, some combination of all three. Plutarch’s Lives, this (...)
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  16.  5
    Rediscovering Political Friendship: Aristotle’s Theory and Modern Identity, Community, and Equality, Written by Paul W. Ludwig.Joel Alden Schlosser - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):358-362.
  17.  4
    The Tyrant’s Progress: The Meaning of ΤΥΡΑΝΝΟΣ in Plato and Aristotle.Edmund Stewart - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):208-236.
    This article considers a longstanding problem: what does the word τύραννος mean? And if it means ‘bad / tyrannical ruler’, why are good rulers called tyrants? The solution proposed here is that tyranny is not a fixed state of being, or not being, but instead a gradual process of development. To be called a tyrant, a ruler need not embody all the stereotypical traits of tyranny. If tyranny is, by definition, unconstitutional and illegitimate rule, then there may be no clear (...)
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  18.  6
    The Deaths of the Republic: Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, Written by Brian Walters.Henriette van der Blom - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):367-370.
  19.  9
    Nemesis, Envy, and Justice in Aristotle’s Political Science.Robert Wyllie - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):237-260.
    Aristotle does not explain why ordinary citizens who lack the virtue of justice nevertheless praise justice and the law. Indignation, defined as pain at the undeserved gains of others, is a promising candidate in the list of means regarding virtues and passions in Book 2 of the Nicomachean Ethics. However, as many scholars have noted, Aristotle’s description of indignation as a mean is flawed. Moreover, indignation is the only characteristic in the list that disappears from the inquiry thereafter. I argue (...)
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  20.  9
    Epilogue: Identity, Politics, Power: From Classical Antiquity to the 21st Century.Ryan K. Balot - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):127-133.
  21.  10
    The Discourse of Kingship in Classical Greece, Written by Carol Atack.Richard Fernando Buxton - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):144-147.
  22.  10
    Plato’s Tough Guys and Their Attachment to Justice, Written by Peter J. Hansen.Paul Diduch - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):153-156.
  23.  7
    Konkurrenz und Institutionalisierung in der griechischen Archaik, edited by Jan B. Meister and Gunnar Seelentag.Alain Duplouy - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):135-138.
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  24.  11
    Discourses of Identity in the Ancient World: Preliminary Remarks.Jakub Filonik & Janek Kucharski - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):1-5.
  25.  8
    Aristotle’s Art of Rhetoric: Translated and with an Interpretive Essay, Written by Robert C. Barlett Aristotle’s Rhetoric: Translated with an Introduction and Notes, Written by C.D.C. Reeve. [REVIEW]Eugene Garver - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):167-171.
  26.  5
    Cato the Younger: Life and Death at the End of the Roman Republic, Written by Fred Drogula.Jennifer Gerrish - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):172-174.
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  27.  3
    Pandering for the Greater Good? Senate, People, and Politics in Cicero’s de Lege Agraria 1 and 2.Brian Krostenko - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):108-126.
    Cicero’s first speeches as consul, de lege agraria I and II, delivered to the senate and the people respectively, are virtually identical in outline and broad argument. That allows the rhetorical technique of individual sections to be compared closely. This article uses such comparisons to probe the tactics and ideology of the speeches. In both Cicero’s choice of word and phrase might suggest that he is simply addressing his audiences as suits their stations. But a consideration of the circumstances of (...)
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  28.  7
    Punishment, Stigma and Social Identities in Classical Athens.Janek Kucharski - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):21-46.
    Taking its cue from modern debates on the expressive function of punishment, this paper discusses the stigmatizing effect of penalties in classical Athens. It focuses on corporal punishment, which was discursively associated in the Athenian public discourse with slaves and other fringe groups of the citizen community, despite the fact that in reality, with only certain restrictions, it was meted out to all social tiers making up the polis-community. Unlike other penalties, those affecting the body were not only public, but (...)
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  29.  2
    The Discourses of Identity in Hellenistic Erythrai: Institutions, Rhetoric, Honour and Reciprocity.Peter Liddel - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):74-107.
    Recent research in the field of New Institutionalist analysis has developed the view that institutions are grounded not only upon authoritative rules but also upon accepted practices and narratives. In this paper I am interested in the ways in which honorific practices and accounts of identity set out in ancient Greek inscriptions contribute towards the persistence of polis institutions in the Hellenistic period. A diachronic survey of Erythraian inscriptions of the classical and Hellenistic periods gives an impression of the adaptation (...)
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  30.  8
    Dressing Like the Great King: Amerindian Perspectives on Persian Fashion in Classical Athens.S. Douglas Olson - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):9-20.
    This paper examines the phenomenon of individual Athenians adopting elements of Persian clothing, making use of exotic items such as gold and silver drinking vessels, and the like, by comparison to what I argue is a similar sort of contact and exchange involving the European fabric trade and evolving standards of dress and fashion in the Early Modern Atlantic. The ancient literary and archaeological sources discussed document the reaction of a relatively insignificant, marginal people to the dress practices of a (...)
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  31.  10
    The Music of Reason: Rousseau, Nietzsche, Plato, Written by Michael Davis.Alex Priou - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):162-166.
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  32.  3
    Herodotus and the Question Why, Written by Christopher Pelling.Joel Alden Schlosser - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):139-143.
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  33.  6
    Poetic Justice. Rereading Plato’s Republic, Written by Jill Frank.Anne-Marie Schultz - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):148-152.
  34.  7
    Rewriting Contemporary Political Philosophy with Plato and Aristotle: An Essay on Eudaimonic Politics, Written by Paul Schollmeier.Jonny Thakkar - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):157-161.
  35.  13
    Religious Identity in Athenian Forensic Oratory: Public Cases of Eisangelia Trials.Eleni Volonaki - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):47-73.
    Attic orators skillfully deployed reference to ancestral cults, sacred laws, traditional rites and other types of religious actions to construct religious identity as a means of persuasion. The present chapter explores the use of a variety of forms of religious argumentation and addresses issues of religious identity in public cases of eisangelia. Emphasis is placed on the question of how orators reconstruct ideal forms of religious identity in their arguments; particularly, the main interest of this chapter lies in the techniques (...)
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