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  1. Is Heaven a Zoopolis?A. G. Holdier - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (4):475–499.
    The concept of service found in Christian theism and related religious perspectives offers robust support for a political defense of nonhuman animal rights, both in the eschaton and in the present state. By adapting the political theory defended by Donaldson and Kymlicka to contemporary theological models of the afterlife and of human agency, I defend a picture of heaven as a harmoniously structured society where humans are the functional leaders of a multifaceted, interspecies citizenry. Consequently, orthodox religious believers (concerned with (...)
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  2.  39
    Empirically Skeptical Theism.Todd DeRose - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (3):323-335.
    Inspired by Peter van Inwagen’s “simulacra model” of the resurrection, I investigate whether it could be reasonable to adopt an analogous approach to the problem of evil. Empirically Skeptical Theism, as I call it, is the hypothesis that God shields our lives from irredeemable evils surreptitiously. I argue that EST compares favorably with traditional skeptical theism and with eschatological theodicies, and that EST does not have the negative moral consequences we might suppose.
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  3.  1
    Leigh Vicens and Simon Kittle, God and Human Freedom. [REVIEW]Peter Furlong - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (3):390-394.
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  4.  3
    Peter Furlong, The Challenges of Divine Determinism: A Philosophical Analysis. [REVIEW]W. Matthews Grant - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (3):370-374.
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  5.  4
    Is an Open Infinite Future Impossible? A Reply to Pruss.Elijah Hess & Alan Rhoda - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (3):363-369.
    Alexander Pruss has recently argued on probabilistic grounds that Christian philosophers should reject Open Futurism—roughly, the thesis that there are no true future contingents—on account of this view’s alleged inability to handle certain statements about infinite futures in a mathematically or religiously adequate manner. We argue that, once the distinction between being true and becoming true is applied to such statements, it is evident that they pose no problem for Open Futurists.
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  6.  5
    W. Matthews Grant, Free Will and God’s Universal Causality: The Dual Sources Account. [REVIEW]Simon Kittle - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (3):374-379.
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  7.  88
    The Dependence Response and Explanatory Loops.Andrew Law - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (3):294-307.
    There is an old and powerful argument for the claim that divine foreknowledge is incompatible with the freedom to do otherwise. A recent response to this argument, sometimes called the “dependence response,” centers around the claim that God’s relevant past beliefs depend on the relevant agent’s current or future behavior in a certain way. This paper offers a new argument for the dependence response, one that revolves around different cases of time travel. Somewhat serendipitously, the argument also paves the way (...)
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  8.  3
    Anne Jeffrey, God and Morality. [REVIEW]Benjamin J. Bruxvoort Lipscomb - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (3):380-384.
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  9.  2
    John Pittard, Disagreement, Deference, and Religious Commitment. [REVIEW]Kirk Lougheed - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (3):384-389.
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  10.  7
    Arguing to Theism From Consciousness.Ben Page - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (3):336-362.
    I provide an argument from consciousness for God’s existence. I first consider a version of the argument which is ultimately difficult to evaluate. I then consider a stronger argument, on which consciousness, given our worldly laws of nature, is rather substantial evidence for God’s existence. It is this latter argument the paper largely focuses on, both in setting it out and defending it from various objections.
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  11.  5
    An Anselmian Approach to Divine Simplicity.Katherin A. Rogers - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (3):308-322.
    The doctrine of divine simplicity is an important aspect of the classical theism of philosophers like Augustine, Anselm, and Thomas Aquinas. Recently the doctrine has been defended in a Thomist mode using the intrinsic/extrinsic distinction. I argue that this approach entails problems which can be avoided by taking Anselm’s more Neoplatonic line. This does involve accepting some controversial claims: for example, that time is isotemporal and that God inevitably does the best. The most difficult problem involves trying to reconcile created (...)
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  12.  40
    Sins of Thought.Mark Schroeder - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (3):273-293.
    According to the Book of Common Prayer, we have sinned against God “in thought, word, and deed.” In this paper I’ll explore one way of understanding what it might mean to sin against God in thought—the idea that we can at least potentially wrong God by what we believe. I will be interested in the philosophical tenability of this idea, and particularly in its potential consequences for the epistemology of religious belief and the problem of evil.
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  13.  5
    Blake Hereth and Kevin Timpe, Eds., The Lost Sheep in Philosophy of Religion: New Perspectives on Disability, Gender, Race, and Animals.Andrew W. Arlig - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (2):248-252.
    The Lost Sheep in Philosophy of Religion: New Perspectives on Disability, Gender, Race, and Animals, edited by Blake Hereth and Kevin Timpe. Routledge, 2020. Pp. xiii + 400. $155.00, $28.98.
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  14. Magical Thinking.Andrew M. Bailey - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (2):181-201.
    According to theists, God is an immaterial thinking being. The main question of this article is whether theism supports the view that we are immaterial thinking beings too. I shall argue in the negative. Along the way, I will also explore some implications in the philosophy of mind following from the observation that, on theism, God’s mentality is in a certain respect magical.
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  15.  10
    Nathan Ballantyne, Knowing Our Limits.Michael Bergmann - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (2):242-248.
    This is a review of Nathan Ballantyne's book *Knowing our Limits*.
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  16. Accounting for the Whole: Why Pantheism is on a Metaphysical Par with Complex Theism.Caleb Cohoe - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (2):202-219.
    Pantheists are often accused of lacking a sufficient account of the unity of the cosmos and its supposed priority over its many parts. I argue that complex theists, those who think that God has ontologically distinct parts or attributes, face the same problems. Current proposals for the metaphysics of complex theism do not offer any greater unity or ontological independence than pantheism, since they are modeled on priority monism. I then discuss whether the formal distinction of John Duns Scotus offers (...)
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  17.  45
    Determining the Need for Explanation.Martin Jakobsen - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (2):230-241.
    Several theistic arguments are formulated as arguments for the best explanation. This article discusses how one can determine that some phenomenon actually needs an explanation. One way to demonstrate that an explanation is needed is by providing one. The proposed explanation ought to either make the occurrence of the phenomenon in question more probable than it occurring by chance, or it has to sufficiently increase our understanding of the phenomenon. A second way to demonstrate that an explanation is needed is (...)
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  18.  6
    How Puzzles of Petitionary Prayer Solve Themselves: Divine Omnirationality, Interest-Relative Explanation, and Answered Prayer.Daniel M. Johnson - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (2):137-157.
    Some have seen in the divine attribute of omnirationality, identified by Alexander R. Pruss, the promise of a dissolution of the usual puzzles of petitionary prayer. Scott Davison has challenged this line of thought with a series of example cases. I will argue that Davison is only partially correct, and that the reasons for this reveal an important new way to approach the puzzles of petitionary prayer. Because explanations are typically interest-relative, there is not one correct account of “answered prayer” (...)
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  19.  5
    Elliot Sober, The Design Argument.John A. Keller - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (2):258-264.
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  20. How God Knows Counterfactuals of Freedom.Justin Mooney - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (2):220-229.
    One problem for Molinism that critics of the view have pressed, and which Molinists have so far done little to address, is that even if there are true counterfactuals of freedom, it is puzzling how God could possibly know them. I defuse this worry by sketching a plausible model of the mechanics of middle knowledge which draws on William Alston’s direct acquaintance account of divine knowledge.
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  21.  2
    Dietrich von Hildebrand with Alice von Hildebrand, Morality and Situation Ethics.Catherine Nolan - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (2):265-269.
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  22.  30
    Are We Free to Break the Laws of Providence?Kenneth L. Pearce - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (2):158-180.
    Can I be free to perform an action if God has decided to ensure that I do not choose that action? I show that Molinists and simple foreknowledge theorists are committed to answering in the affirmative. This is problematic for their status as theological incompatibilists. I suggest that strategies for preserving their theological incompatibilism in light of this result should be based on sourcehood. However, the path is not easy here either, since Leibniz has shown how theological determinists can offer (...)
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  23.  4
    John H. McClendon III, Black Christology and the Quest for Authenticity: A Philosophical Appraisal.Sameer Yadav - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (2):253-258.
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  24.  7
    In Defense of Extended Conciliar Christology: A Philosophical Essay, by Timothy Pawl. Oxford University Press, 2019. Pp. Xii + 250. $90 (Hardcover). [REVIEW]J. C. Beall - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (1):128-133.
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  25.  2
    God, Existence, and Fictional Objects: The Case for Meinongian Theism, by John-Mark L. Miravalle. Bloomsbury, 2018. Pp. 192. $114 (Hardback). [REVIEW]Mary Beth Willard - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (1):122-127.
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  26.  4
    On Being Human and Divine: The Coherence of the Incarnation.Christopher Hauser - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (1):3-31.
    According to the doctrine of the Incarnation, one person, Christ, has both the attributes proper to a human being and the attributes proper to God. This claim has given rise to the coherence objection, i.e., the objection that it is impossible for one individual to have both sets of attributes. Several authors have offered responses which rely on the idea that Christ has the relevant human properties in virtue of having a concrete human nature which has those properties. I show (...)
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  27.  5
    God, Horrors, and Our Deepest Good.Bruce Langtry - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (1):77-95.
    J.L. Schellenberg argues that since God, if God exists, possesses both full knowledge by acquaintance of horrific suffering and also infinite compassion, the occurrence of horrific suffering is metaphysically incompatible with the existence of God. In this paper I begin by raising doubts about Schellenberg’s assumptions about divine knowledge by acquaintance and infinite compassion. I then focus on Schellenberg’s claim that necessarily, if God exists and the deepest good of finite persons is unsurpassably great and can be achieved without horrific (...)
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  28.  8
    Moral Duties and Divine Commands: Is Kantian Religion Coherent?Micah Lott - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (1):57-76.
    Kant argues that morality leads to religion, and that religion consists in regarding our moral duties as divine commands. This paper explores a foundational question for Kantian religion: When you think of your duties as divine commands, what exactly are you thinking, and how is that thought consistent with Kant’s own account of the ways that morality is independent from God? I argue that if we assume the Kantian religious person acts out of obedience to God, then her overall outlook (...)
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  29.  3
    The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Childhood and Children, Edited by Anca Gheaus, Gideon Calder, and Jurgen De Wispelaere. Routledge Press, 2019. Pp. 424. $ 220 (Hardback). [REVIEW]Kevin Timpe - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (1):118-122.
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  30. Divine Satisficing and the Ethics of the Problem of Evil.Chris Tucker - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (1):32-56.
    This paper accomplishes three goals. First, it reveals that God’s ethics has a radical satisficing structure: God can choose a good enough suboptimal option even if there is a best option and no countervailing considerations. Second, it resolves the long-standing worry that there is no account of the good enough that is both principled and demanding enough to be good enough. Third, it vindicates the key ethical assumption in the problem of evil without relying on the contested assumption that God’s (...)
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  31.  8
    In Defense of a Latin Social Trinity: A Response to William Hasker.Scott M. Williams - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (1):96-117.
    In “Unity of Action in a Latin Social Model of the Trinity,” I objected to William Hasker’s Social Model of the Trinity on the grounds that it does not secure the necessary agreement between the divine persons. Further, I developed a Latin Social model of the Trinity. Hasker has responded by defending his Social Model and by raising seven objections against my Latin Social Model. Here I raise a new objection against Hasker on the grounds that it is inconsistent with (...)
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  32.  16
    In Defense of a Latin Social Trinity: A Response to William Hasker.Scott M. Williams - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 31 (7):96-117.
    In “Unity of Action in a Latin Social Model of the Trinity,” I objected to William Hasker’s Social Model of the Trinity (among others) on the grounds that it does not secure the necessary agreement between the divine persons. Further, I developed a Latin Social model of the Trinity. Hasker has responded by defending his Social Model and by raising seven objections against my Latin Social Model. Here I raise a new objection against Hasker on the grounds that it is (...)
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