15 found

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  1.  4
    Why Are We All Too Familiar With Headphones Attached to a Wall?Liora Belford - 2020 - Substance 49 (2):93-107.
    Even though music and visual art have often been performed or installed together in the same places, sound-as-art entered the gallery space only after composers explored the idea of visualizing music, encouraging artists to use scores, sounds, and noises as plastic material. While it’s true that sound poetry was practiced by Futurist and Dadaist artists in the late nineteenth century1 and that Marcel Duchamp was working with the musical score from as early as 1913,2 it took almost another forty years, (...)
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  2.  2
    The Sound of the Sublime: Notes on Burke as Time Goes By.Esteban Buch - 2020 - Substance 49 (2):44-59.
    Think of the sublime: images come to mind first. Images of mountains, oceans, deserts, and other wild natural sites. Images of pyramids, cathedrals, skyscrapers, and other colossal cultural artifacts. Most of these mental images are probably still and silent, very much like photos. They might also portray dynamic situations, like big waves breaking on a rocky shore, or high trees moved by a thunderous storm, or the wind howling across the ruins of an ancient temple. Yet these scenes are likely (...)
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  3.  1
    Soundscape and Power.Serge Cardinal & Oana Avasilichioaei - 2020 - Substance 49 (2):60-70.
    In Balcony in the Forest, Julien Gracq composes a soundscape in four dimensions: he establishes an undulating background by involving spatial events; he forms temporal figures by involving material affects—spatial events and material affects extracted from depths before being enveloped by a resonant place. Each of the four dimensions has a particular relationship to the sounds of power and the power of sound, and it is up to the reader to decide whether the soundscape composed in and by the writing (...)
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  4.  1
    Machinations of the Senses.Daniel Deshays & David F. Bell - 2020 - Substance 49 (2):30-43.
    “I don’t believe what people say to me, I believe the way they say it,” Christian Bobin said. “This is where the sonic is located, in the manner of speaking, in the way in which bodies move and silences occur.”It would be hard to argue that sound is something the public or professionals, whose work is to create sound, actually think about carefully and consciously, as strange as this might seem. Sound in film is rarely addressed from a theoretical perspective. (...)
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  5.  3
    Siren Enchantments, or, Reading Sound in Medieval Books.Sarah Kay - 2020 - Substance 49 (2):108-132.
    Scholars of the Middle Ages are reflecting productively on the sound not only of the text, but of the book.1 Formed from the skins of dead animals, parchment pages have a positive and intimate bond with silence in a way that paper does not. And yet the same or similar animal membranes are used for drum skins, tambourines, or the bellows of bagpipes, while the body of the human reader, enveloped in a skin that closely resembles parchment and is near (...)
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  6. Are Sounds Sound? For an Enthusiastic Study of Sound Studies.Eric Méchoulan & David F. Bell - 2020 - Substance 49 (2):3-29.
    How is it possible for sounds to be sound? The evanescence of sounds seems to provide us with no more than a fragile foundation, even if echo and resonance offer fleeting extensions of sonic moments. Historians of the senses have told us that despite the importance of audition and orality in antiquity and the Middle Ages, modernity has privileged vision, and this predilection has accompanied and buttressed modern attempts in science and philosophy to provide a firm foundation for knowledge. The (...)
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  7. The Color of Noise.John Mowitt - 2020 - Substance 49 (2):133-149.
    In addition to this, I also have to move lodgings. The noise of the children has made the house in which I have been staying, quite useless for work. I will be exchanging this house for another one that is inhabited by a man with mental illness.Perhaps because in my research I have combed, perhaps over-combed, the matter of the emergence of sound studies as a field scholarly consideration of the topic “Sound and its Aftermath” seemed to solicit, even call (...)
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  8.  7
    Adrift: Havarie, an Acousmatic Film by Philip Scheffner.Johanne Villeneuve & Debbie Blythe - 2020 - Substance 49 (2):71-92.
    This text is based on an image that, in some ways, can be understood only in terms of sound. In the lonely darkness of a movie theatre, the audience spends ninety minutes gazing at a single image: that of a rubber dinghy drifting aimlessly on a vast expanse of water.This is the rare challenge posed by German filmmaker Philip Scheffner with his documentary Havarie: viewers are asked to focus on a single image while listening to a variety of sounds – (...)
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  9.  7
    The Synecdoche of Poiesis.Jeremiah Bowen - 2020 - Substance 49 (1):3-24.
    A word from the wise is not to be discarded, O Phaedrus, but it is to be examined.The Socratic project is founded on the fallibility of those reputed to be wise, and the necessity of examining their wisdom. The importance of fallibility is clear enough in the Apology, in Socrates’s insistence that he is only wiser than others because he acknowledges his own ignorance. In Phaedrus, it is the basis of his distinction between the sophoi, the wise or learned, and (...)
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  10.  7
    Against Pessimism, or, the Education of Hope.Mikkel Krause Frantzen - 2020 - Substance 49 (1):97-109.
    We live in a time of crisis. Economic crisis, ecological crisis, refugee crisis. Scholars talk about the end of history, the end of politics, the end of nature, the end of the world as we know it. Racism and neo-fascism are on the march pretty much all over the Western world; Mexican children are torn away from their parents at the US border; temperatures are rising everywhere ; islands of microplastic accumulate in the Pacific, and the latest news: Europe’s taxpayers (...)
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  11.  5
    Foreign Food, Foreign Flesh: Apathetic Anthropophagy and Racial Melancholia in Houellebecq's Submission.Luke F. Johnson - 2020 - Substance 49 (1):25-40.
    This article explores the cannibalistic dimensions of racial disgust and desire in Michel Houellebecq’s Submission. Situated within broader discourses of French déclinisme, Submis- sion offers a melancholic portrait of white nostalgia. Through the tastes and consumptive practices of his characters, Houellebecq depicts white identification as dependent on an ambivalent relationship to corporeal difference. Paying close attention to the mouth’s dual function as a site of ontological triage (sorting out the human from the non-human, the edible from the inedible) and ontological (...)
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  12.  5
    On the Word BUT and its Function: An Investigation, Using Algorithms, Into Hegel's Method of Paragraph Composition.S. F. Kislev - 2020 - Substance 49 (1):41-73.
    “The forms of thought are first set out and stored in human language,” we read in the preface to the second edition of Hegel’s Science of Logic. Man thinks through language, and everything he “transforms into language and expresses in it contains a category, whether concealed, mixed, or well defined”. Language, then, harbors thought categories. There is a philosophy of language, but there is also a philosophy implied in language. How is this supposed to work? More specifically, how is this (...)
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  13.  7
    Cognitive Literary Science: Dialogues Between Literature and Cognition Ed. By Michael Burke, Emily T. Troscianko.Jean-François Vernay - 2020 - Substance 49 (1):110-114.
    Cognitive Literary Studies is gradually making its mark on the publishing world with a growing number of theoretical works that blend scientific approaches with the practice of literary theory. To some extent, this slowly emerging current could even be construed as the missing link, if not the ideal interface, between science and the humanities. At the crossroads of these two areas of study, Cognitive Literary Studies offers an extraordinary opportunity to bridge the “gulf of mutual incomprehension” between literary intellectuals and (...)
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  14.  5
    Devlin's Love: Autopoiesis and Harold Pinter's Ashes to Ashes.Guy Zimmerman - 2020 - Substance 49 (1):74-96.
    Whereas the action of a representational or realist play is typically the product of careful dramatic construction involving motivations and conflict, Harold Pinter’s late play Ashes to Ashes assembles itself out of pure aporia and not knowing. The first lines of the play, for example, combine anxious questioning with slowly emergent knowledge about an event in the past:Well…for example…he would stand over me and clench his fist. And then he’d put his other hand on my neck and grip it and (...)
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  15. Why Michel Serres?Christopher Watkin - 2020 - Substance 48 (3).
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