22 found

Year:

  1.  1
    "As Nameless as a Flower": The Exhaustions and Excesses of Outliving in Ganja & Hess.Kevin Bell - 2021 - Substance 50 (2):79-101.
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  2. Staging Blanchot.Christophe Bident & Sylvia Gorelick - 2021 - Substance 50 (2):141-155.
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  3.  4
    Varieties of Nothing.John Brenkman - 2021 - Substance 50 (2):119-140.
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  4.  1
    "A Divided Self and a Doubled World": On Stanley Cavell's Perfectionism.Rex Butler - 2021 - Substance 50 (2):156-172.
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  5.  2
    Fiche de Fragment: Reading Blanchot with Char.Tom Conley - 2021 - Substance 50 (2):11-24.
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  6.  3
    The Joy of Uprising and the Fear of the State: On Blanchot's Insurrectional Writings.Jean-François Hamel & Bernard Schutze - 2021 - Substance 50 (2):45-60.
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  7.  1
    Introduction: Reading After Blanchot.Zakir Paul - 2021 - Substance 50 (2):3-10.
    "Blanchot is an even greater waste of time than Proust". George Poulet's judgment, in Ann Smock's wry translation, gives pause to anyone who might claim contemporary literary or political relevance for the French writer, critic, and journalist. Poulet writes, "Thus, much more radically even than Proust, Maurice Blanchot appears a man of 'lost time'".1 How does relegating him to such a forgotten past, only accessed involuntarily through missteps, square with his enduring influence over post-war French thought and narrative? Blanchot seems (...)
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  8.  1
    Terror of the Image: Maurice Blanchot and Mohammed Dib in Conversation.Nasrin Qader - 2021 - Substance 50 (2):102-118.
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  9.  1
    Politics and Ontology of the Image: Godard's Debt to Blanchot.Anne-Gaëlle Saliot - 2021 - Substance 50 (2):61-78.
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  10.  6
    An Interview with Jacques Rancière: Playing Freely, From the Other, to the Letter.Joseph R. Shafer & Jacques Rancière - 2021 - Substance 50 (2):173-191.
    When I first contacted Jacques Rancière in March 2017, nearly three-and-a-half years before the completion of this interview, a few basic questions were growing heavy. Questions limited to current political climates, trending philosophical systems, specific literary works, designated historical shifts, or particular Rancièrean terms would be reluctantly put aside in pursuit of certain elemental distinctions that might better inform the rest. The original proposal was to work around such slippery paradoxes as resistance, and to readdress tangible material like the letter, (...)
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  11. Listening for Blanchot.Ann Smock - 2021 - Substance 50 (2):25-44.
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  12.  3
    Translating Whispers: Recitation, Realism, Religion.Michael Allan - 2021 - Substance 50 (1):10-26.
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  13.  3
    World Literature in Stereo: Magnetic Tape and the Media Futures of Global Literary History.Jacob Edmond - 2021 - Substance 50 (1):27-53.
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  14.  5
    The Postlingual Turn.Yasser Elhariry & Rebecca L. Walkowitz - 2021 - Substance 50 (1):3-9.
    No one is born speaking or writing a language. We all begin as language learners, and in that sense, there are no native languages. There are only foreign languages. As language educators and as scholars of literatures produced by Black, migrant, indigenous, and multilingual artists, we know that even the universalism of “foreign languages” and “second languages”—which holds the Other at tongue’s length, so to speak—needs to be replaced by the universalism of “additional languages.” Every language is an additional language, (...)
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  15.  4
    The Inappropriable: On Oikology, Care, and Writing Life.Kélina Gotman - 2021 - Substance 50 (1):116-139.
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  16.  4
    Liban. Mémoires Fragmentées D’Une Guerre Obsédante: L’Anamnèse Dans la Production Culturelle Francophone (2000–2015) by Carla Calargé. [REVIEW]Ghenwa Hayek - 2021 - Substance 50 (1):197-202.
    Anamnesis, the first word in the subtitle of Carla Calargé’s study of the Francophone cultural production of the second and third decades of Lebanon’s post-civil war period, is a keyword that bears further scrutiny for the light that it sheds on Calargé’s approach to her subject matter. From the Greek word for remembrance, anamnesis in Platonic philosophy is the act of recalling – and relearning – that which one once knew, but forgot; it is the retrieval of a past, now-erased (...)
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  17.  3
    Shakespeare’s Spam Poethics.Christine Hoffmann - 2021 - Substance 50 (1):140-161.
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  18.  2
    Faciality and Ontological Doubt in Ralph Eugene Meatyard’s Photography.Atėnė Mendelytė - 2021 - Substance 50 (1):162-181.
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  19.  4
    Exceedingly Non-Monolingual: Associating with Uljana Wolf and Christian Hawkey’s Sonne From Ort.Brigitte Rath - 2021 - Substance 50 (1):76-94.
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  20.  5
    Inuit Songs and Resonating Lyres: Harmony and Resonance in Jean-Luc Nancy’s The Inoperative Community.Krzysztof Skonieczny - 2021 - Substance 50 (1):182-196.
    In The Inoperative Community Jean-Luc Nancy suggests that his conception of speech as the cornerstone of community can be likened to the image of two Inuit women engaging in traditional vocal games (katajjaq). This article (1) elucidates this connection through the analysis of ethnographic and ethnomusicological data on katajjaq; (2) shows how the similarity of this image to that of two resonating lyres present in the works of the Renaissance philosopher Marsilio Ficino can be used to understand Nancy’s political philosophy (...)
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  21.  4
    Less Than One Language: Typographic Multilingualism and Post-Anglophone Fiction.Rebecca L. Walkowitz - 2021 - Substance 50 (1):95-115.
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  22.  5
    4E Cognition and Eighteenth-Century Fiction: How the Novel Found its Feet by Karin Kukkonen.Wen Yongchao - 2021 - Substance 50 (1):203-209.
    4E cognition is the defining feature of second-generation cognitive science, which replaces a computer-like cognitive processing model with one that highlights the interactive dynamism between the mind, the body and the environment. Research on literary reading in light of 4E cognition has piqued scholarly interest in the theoretical and empirical study of embodied reading. Karin Kukkonen’s 4E Cognition and Eighteenth Century Fiction is the first monograph in this field that proposes a historical approach to cognitive literary studies and examines how (...)
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