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  1.  1
    Sexual Identity or Religious Freedom: Could Conversion Therapy Ever Be Morally Permissible in Limited Urgent Situations? [REVIEW]Owen M. Bradfield - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (1):51-59.
    Conversion therapy refers to a range of unscientific, discredited and harmful heterosexist practices that attempt to re-align an individual’s sexual orientation, usually from non-heterosexual to heterosexual. In Australia, the state of Victoria recently joined Queensland and the Australian Capital Territory in criminalising conversion therapy. Although many other jurisdictions have also introduced legislation banning conversion therapy, it persists in over 60 countries. Children are particularly vulnerable to the harmful effects of conversion therapy, which can include coercion, rejection, isolation and blame. However, (...)
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  2. Human Research Ethics Committees Members: Ethical Review Personal Perceptions. [REVIEW]Marc Fellman, Anne-Marie Irwin, Keagan Brewer, Marguerite Maher, Kevin Watson, Chris Campbell & Boris Handal - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (1):94-114.
    This study aims to characterise Human Research Ethics Committee members’ perceptions on five main themes associated with ethics reviews, namely, the nature of research, ethical/moral issues, assent, participants’ risk and HREC prerogatives issues. Three hundred and sixteen HREC members from over 200 HRECs throughout Australia responded to an online questionnaire survey. The results show that in general, HREC members’ beliefs are reasoned and align with sound principles of ethical reviews. There seems to be a disposition for living up to ethical/moral (...)
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  3. A Framework for Ethics Review of Applications to Store, Reuse and Share Tissue Samples.Ian Kerridge, Cameron Stewart, Wendy Lipworth & Shih-Ning Then - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (1):115-124.
    The practice of biobank networking—where biobanks are linked together, and researchers share human tissue samples—is an increasingly common practice both domestically and internationally. The benefits from networking in this way are well established. However, there is a need for ethical oversight in the sharing of human tissue. Ethics committees will increasingly be called upon to approve the sharing of tissue and data with other researchers, often via biobanks, and little guidance currently exists for such committees. In this paper, we provide (...)
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  4. 50 Years of Advance Care Planning: What Do We Call Success?Kerstin Knight - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (1):28-50.
    Advance care planning is promoted as beneficial practice internationally. This article critically examines different ways of understanding and measuring success in ACP. It has been 50 years since Luis Kutner first published his original idea of the Living Will, which was thought to be a contract between health carers and patients to provide for instructions about treatment choices in cases of mental incapacity. Its purpose was to extend a patient's right to autonomy and protect health carers from charges of wrong-doing. (...)
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  5.  3
    Can ‘Eugenics’ Be Defended?Francesca Minerva, Diana S. Fleischman, Peter Singer, Nicholas Agar, Jonathan Anomaly & Walter Veit - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (1):60-67.
    In recent years, bioethical discourse around the topic of ‘genetic enhancement’ has become increasingly politicized. We fear there is too much focus on the semantic question of whether we should call particular practices and emerging bio-technologies such as CRISPR ‘eugenics’, rather than the more important question of how we should view them from the perspective of ethics and policy. Here, we address the question of whether ‘eugenics’ can be defended and how proponents and critics of enhancement should engage with each (...)
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  6. Reflections on Autonomy in Travel for Cross Border Reproductive Care.Anita Stuhmcke - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (1):1-27.
    Travel for reproductive health care has become a widespread global phenomenon. Within the field, the decision to travel to seek third parties to assist with reproduction is widely assumed to be autonomous. However there has been scant research exploring the application of the principle of autonomy to the experience of the cross-border traveller. Seeking to contribute to the growing, but still small, body of sociological bioethics research, this paper maps the application of the ethical principle of autonomy to the lived (...)
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