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  1.  5
    Peirce on the Symbolical Foundation of Personhood.André De Tienne - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (4):79-100.
    This paper discusses the semiotic and metaphysical framework within which Peirce elaborated a symbolical and dynamical conception of personhood. It exhibits the centrality of Peirce’s early conception of the “unity of consistency” along with its decentering advantages. It describes how this gave rise to a metaphysics of personhood that questions the singularity of individuals. It then conducts a semiotic study of the evolutive process across which something indeterminate evolves into something determinate that increasingly personifies itself following the logic of symbolization, (...)
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  2.  6
    The Horizontal-Ontological Nature of The Physical Culture of Cancers.John F. DeCarlo - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (4):101-112.
    Whereas classical Darwinian evolution is based on the model of vertical development, per species, and related sexual selection and natural mutations, along with environmental selective pressures, epi-genetics presents a supplemental view of horizontal development as DNA is both selectively transcribed and translated by mRNA and influenced by a process of horizontal gene transfer, including genetic melding of microbes, organelles, plants, animals and other types of hominoids. Thus, a philosophy of physical culture is offered in which cancers are conceived of as (...)
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  3.  1
    Running and the Paradox of Suffering.Ralph D. Ellis - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (4):8-20.
    What motivates the voluntary suffering of training for a long-distance run – or any other difficult athletic skill? Long-term pleasure cannot adequately explain this seemingly masochistic activity. On the contrary, I argue that pleasure, or “reinforcement,” is not the only ultimate motivator of behavior. Each of the emotion systems defines its own intrinsic values, including an innate “play” system and an innate “exploratory drive” that is included in what neuropsychologist Jaak Panksepp calls the “SEEKING system” of the emotional brain. Panksepp’s (...)
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  4.  2
    East and West on the Tension Between Ars Erotica and Ars Vivendi.Marta Faustino - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (4):147-151.
    Preview: /Commentary: Richard Shusterman, Ars Erotica: Sex and Somaesthetics in the Classical Arts of Love, 436 pages./ Richard Shusterman’s Ars Erotica: Sex and Somaesthetics in the Classical Arts of Love is a masterpiece in a number of respects. With its focus on erotic love and the aesthetics of lovemaking, the book is to be admired for having the audacity to broach a topic that tends to be neglected – if not repressed – in contemporary academic scholarship. But Ars Erotica is (...)
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  5.  7
    Disability as a Cultural Problem.Johnathan Flowers - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (4):39-61.
    This paper aims to reframe disability through John Dewey’s transactional theory of culture to indicate how disability is not located in the biological organization of the individual nor in the organization of culture, but in the transactions between the two. This paper will apply Dewey’s theory of culture to disability studies and philosophy of disability and then to ADHD to make clear the benefits of a transactional model of disability.
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  6. On Justice as Dance.Joshua Hall - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (4):62-78.
    This article is part of a larger project that explores how to channel people’s passion for popular arts into legal social justice by reconceiving law as a kind of poetry and justice as dance, and exploring different possible relationships between said legal poetry and dancing justice. I begin by rehearsing my previous new conception of social justice as organismic empowerment, and my interpretive method of dancing-with. I then apply this method to the following four “ethico-political choreographies of justice”: the choral (...)
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  7.  3
    Somaesthetics and the Cross-Cultural Dressing of Desire.Marzenna Jakubczak - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (4):123-128.
    Preview: /Commentary: Richard Shusterman, Ars Erotica: Sex and Somaesthetics in the Classical Arts of Love, 436 pages./ Somaesthetics, the field cultivated by Richard Shusterman since 1997, bore another juicy fruit for our enjoyment. This time, his interdisciplinary research – integrating the theoretical, empirical, and practical disciplines related to bodily perception, presentation, and performance – resulted in an excellent cross-cultural study of the classical arts of love developed over centuries in such traditions as the Greco-Roman, Chinese, Indian, Muslim, Medieval and European (...)
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  8.  2
    From Platonism and the Farnese Hercules to Steve Reeves and the Peplum Hercules Via a Radical Ohio Hegelian and His Socialist German Acrobats.James McLachlan - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (4):113-122.
    Preview: In Jane Campion’s recent film version of Thomas Savage’s Power of the Dog, young Peter comes across his, and his mother’s tormentor, Phil’s secret hiding place. There he discovers in a lean-to the cowboy homophobic Phil’s copies of Physical Culture. As he leafs through the magazines, he sees the famous pictures of Eugen Sandow and his fig leaf posed as the Farnese Hercules. The scene does not appear in Savage’s novel. Flash backward or forwards a few years depending on (...)
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  9.  2
    The Will to Powerlift: Biophysical Reality and the Creation of Culture.Laura Mueller - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (4):1-7.
    Preview: There is an ongoing joke – often said with a sigh of despair – within various communities: those who struggle with mental health, or chronic pain, or disabilities of any sort. This joke might, in fact, be one nexus of these communities – what brings them together in irritation – and it goes like this: “Have you tried yoga?” The often-given unsolicited advice to “heal thyself” using physical movement speaks to a deeper issue at hand, one long-entrenched in our (...)
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  10.  2
    Updating Artes Vulgares.Max Ryynänen - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (4):129-132.
    Preview: /Commentary: Richard Shusterman, Ars Erotica: Sex and Somaesthetics in the Classical Arts of Love, 436 pages./ I think “it is official” now. Ars Erotica will become some sort of classic. There are several reasons why. Some, just cannot stop giggling when they hear the word sex. Many will grab the book out of curiosity, and maybe some, although I do not believe that many, will even do it for camp reasons. Many of these readers have a neurotic and/or complicated (...)
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  11.  5
    The Erotic and the Political: The Somaesthetics of Sex in Social.Crispin Sartwell - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (4):152-155.
    Preview: /Commentary: Richard Shusterman, Ars Erotica: Sex and Somaesthetics in the Classical Arts of Love, 436 pages./ Richard Shusterman’s work is remarkable, among other things, for extending the range and power of the discipline of aesthetics, conceived by him as fundamental to many dimensions of human experience. Indeed, he has driven aesthetics into entirely new ranges of phenomena and strategies for research, and also perhaps returned to an ancient sense of the centrality of aesthetic concepts such as beauty to virtually (...)
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  12.  4
    “Bringin’ Sexy Back” (and With It, Women): Shusterman Beyond Foucault on the Greeks.Matthew Sharpe - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (4):138-146.
    Richard Shusterman, Ars Erotica: Sex and Somaesthetics in the Classical Arts of Love (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021), 436 pages./ Like other contributors, I would like to begin by expressing my respect and admiration for the scale and scope of Richard Shusterman’s achievement in Ars Erotica. The Preface acknowledges “the vast amount of material” involved in this project of charting “the history of erotic theory in the world’s most influential premodern cultures,” with each chapter on a different cultural tradition potentially (...)
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  13.  4
    Ennobling Love and Erotic Elevation: A Response to Six Readings of Ars Erotica.Richard Shusterman - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (4):156-170.
    Preview: In various guises and cultures, the theme of elevating, ennobling love is a recurrent topos in the premodern erotic theory my book traces. Freed from Plato’s problematic dualistic denigration of the body as prison of the soul and from the modern aesthetic prejudice of disinterestedness, Ars Erotica recaptures the valuable core of ennobling desire by showing how a new somaesthetic approach to sex could channel the power of eros to cultivate qualities of courtesy, grace, skill, self-mastery, and sensitivity to (...)
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  14.  1
    Eugen Sandow: Performing New Masculinities.Aaron Wood - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (4):21-38.
    In the late 1800s masculinity as understood in the United States’ urban northeast underwent a major transformation as the preceding emphasis upon decorum and civility gave way to a new ideal based on masculine health and fitness. This thesis seeks to demonstrate the significant role that Eugen Sandow, a Prussian born strongman who rose to international fame at the turn of the century, played in this masculine transformation. Sandow rose to stardom alongside theatre impresario Florenz Ziegfeld and used that stardom (...)
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  15.  2
    The Somaesthetic Dimension of the Chinese Qi Erotics.Ellen Y. Zhang - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (4):133-137.
    Preview: /Commentary: Richard Shusterman, Ars Erotica: Sex and Somaesthetics in the Classical Arts of Love, 436 pages./ Richard Shusterman is the not the first scholar in the West who introduces sex and sexuality in the Chinese tradition. Other scholars engaged in this theme include Robert van Gulik, Michel Foucault, Douglas Wile, and Fang Fu Ruan. Nevertheless, Shusterman is the first one who brings the topic from the perspective of somaesthetics and within a bigger context: the classical arts of love in (...)
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  16.  2
    A Few Theses on Art, Alienation, and Abolition.James Anderson - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (3):92-119.
    Marcuse suggested the alienation of art from society intrinsic to the aesthetic form represents and recollects an unreal world capable of indicting existing social arrangements while simultaneously providing a sensuous experience of another possible, liberated reality denied by established institutions. Drawing on and recasting part of Marcuse’s theory of art and the aesthetic dimension, the author puts forward several theses regarding art, alienation and abolition of the prison-industrial complex. First, art implies alienation; yet, because of that condition, art offers an (...)
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  17.  4
    Faith and Knowledge, Reconsidered: Modern Religion and the “Time of Life”.Agata Bielik-Robson - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (3):1-6.
    Preview: Almost twenty-five years have passed after the publication of Jacques Derrida’s 1996 seminal essay, “Faith and Knowledge: Religion at the Limits of Reason Alone,” one of the most important, but also most enigmatic post-secular texts of late modernity. Six articles in this issue are devoted directly to Derrida’s essay. The other two can also be read along them as dealing with broadly conceived post-secular issues. They all can be brought under the traditional heading of “faith and knowledge” – simultaneously (...)
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  18. In Praise of Friendship… Among Other Things. [REVIEW]Barbara Brzezicka - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (3):135-141.
    Preview: In this article I will try to discuss some thoughts presented by Michał Herer in his book In Praise of Friendship. I read it a couple of times and it certainly deserves both the Barbara Skarga prize and interest among young scholars and students of philosophy. However, it left me wanting more every time I read it. In the present text I would like to discuss some aspects of the essay and suggest some possible ways in which the ideas (...)
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  19.  4
    On the New and the Novel: An Adventure in the Temporal Logics.Matthew Z. Donnelly - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (3):120-134.
    This paper is an adventure of ideas. More specifically, it is a continuation of the adventure of ideas concerning the relations between creativity and logic at the level of being one finds in the work of Whitehead and his interpreters/inheritors. The “argument” of the paper, such as it is, is that ontological creativity may be fruitfully described by two logical functions, one exploding the movement from possibility to actuality, and the other from actuality to possibility. The paper explores both functions, (...)
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  20.  1
    Is There Life Before Death? On Agata Bielik Robson’s Another Finitude. [REVIEW]Michał Herer - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (3):155-160.
    Preview: Since Nietzsche announced the death of God, thinkers who took his words seriously have been dealing with one crucial question: how to live a life stripped of any references to transcendent divinity? Are we to mourn God’s death indefinitely? Will we finally acknowledge and embrace our status of finite and contingent creatures? In her recent book titled Another Finitude Agata Bielik Robson addresses these questions. While this is certainly not the first time she has tackled such issues, this study (...)
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  21.  3
    Number(s) of Future(s), Number(s) of Faith(S): Call It a Day for Religion.Joanna Hodge - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (3):64-81.
    Encrypted in Derrida’s contribution to the Capri Seminar on Religion in 1994 are three retrievals: of his discussions of speech and of systems of inscription; of a concealment of splittings in the supposed continuities of traditions; and of a complicity between the operations of religion and those of a dissipation of the unities of science, Enlightenment, and knowledge, into proliferating autotelic tele-technologies. These retrievals take place between the lines of this discussion of faith, knowledge and religion, which arrives in two (...)
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  22. “A Certain Way of Thinking”: Derrida, Weil and the Philippi Hymn.Stuart Jesson - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (3):7-22.
    Toward the beginning of one of her notebooks, Simone Weil interrupts a dense series of reflections on war, force and prestige to write, in parentheses: “(To think on God, to love God, is nothing else than a certain way of thinking on the world.)” In some respects, this one sentence is a crystallization of everything Weil wrote about God. The thought of God is somehow inseparable from a new mode of attention to and valuation of things “here below”; that is, (...)
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  23.  6
    The Religion (Without Religion) of the Living (Without Life): Re-Reading Derrida’s “Faith and Knowledge”.King-Ho Leung - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (3):35-49.
    This article offers a reading of Jacques Derrida’s account of “religion” and “life” in his seminal essay “Faith and Knowledge.” Applying Derrida’s aporetic structure of “X without X” to his remarks on religion and life in “Faith and Knowledge,” this article suggests that underlying Derrida’s endeavor to “think religion abstractly” is a radical re-conception not only of religion as “religion without religion” but moreover a re-imagination of life as “life without life” that breaks away from the traditional metaphysical understandings of (...)
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  24.  3
    Broken Latin, Secret Europe: Benjamin, Celan, Derrida.Adam Lipszyc - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (3):82-91.
    The author begins by analyzing Walter Benjamin’s quarrel with George Kreis and the respective visions of culture advocated by both sides of the debate. Then, he offers a reading of a poem by Paul Celan in which the poet sides with Benjamin, but also makes his position more complex, ultimately offering a paradoxical figure of “the secret openness” or “open/public secrecy” as a remedy against the “mystery” of the Georgians. This idea can be seen as developed in Jacques Derrida’s understanding (...)
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  25.  3
    Abstraction Made Flesh – Immediacy of the Body and Religious Experience. Derrida, Hegel and Georges de La Tour.Marta Olesik - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (3):50-63.
    The text juxtaposes two different understandings of religion, the first: Hegelian, where it functions as an imaginary representation of the concept, and the second: Derridean, which confronts and radicalizes the idea of the death of God. At the center of their juxtaposition is the process of abstraction and the religious figure of the “desert” which both authors use to illustrate it. Central to Derrida’s thinking of religion, understood as a figure of relentless negativity in search of difference, a “desert” can (...)
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  26. Toward New Adventures in Philosophy. [REVIEW]Lucio Angelo Privitello - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (3):142-154.
    Preview: Eli Kramer has provided us with the first volume of an ambitious trilogy entitled Intercultural Modes of Philosophy. His first volume, Principles to Guide Philosophical Community, sets us on a rich, detailed, and lengthy exploration of the much neglected, and at times romanticized, communal mode of Philosophy. For Kramer, philosophical community is a “mode of mutually reinforced ethical praxis in a shared cosmopolitan place”. The exploration of these communities, serves as “[a transition] to a new adventure in philosophy”, along (...)
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  27.  2
    Against Autoimmune Self-Sacrifice: Religiosity, Messianicity, and Violence in Derrida’s “Faith and Knowledge” and in Classical Rabbinic Judaism.Daniel H. Weiss - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (3):23-34.
    In this essay, I argue that a comparison of Derrida’s “Faith and Knowledge” to the texts and thought of classical rabbinic Judaism can illuminate new conceptual connections among the different elements of Derrida’s thought. Both Derrida and the rabbinic texts can be viewed as affirming a type of “holding back” and “allowing the other to be,” stances which Derrida links to “religiosity” and to “messianicity beyond all messianism.” Moreover, the rabbinic texts appear to avoid the “autoimmune” reaction that Derrida sees (...)
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  28.  2
    Technological Exercises.Piotr Dobkowski - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (2):78-87.
    The paper aims at setting the problem of the relation between technology, and the individual within the framework of Pierre Hadot’s idea of spiritual exercises. It compares two rivaling views of technology that originated in the Weimar Republic in order to outline a problematic field for examining the present position of the individual and technology. As the approaches of Weimar philosophers call for an actualization, the conception of Michel Foucault’s technologies of the self is brought forth. In the conclusion of (...)
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  29.  2
    Reclaiming Time Aesthetically: Hadot, Spiritual Exercises and Gardening.Monika Favara-Kurkowski - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (2):7-21.
    Pierre Hadot’s legacy is a vision of ancient philosophy not only as a system of abstract concepts and logical procedures but as a practical philosophical methodology. A key element of this interpretation is consideration of ancient philosophical practice as a series of spiritual exercises to improve one’s own life. The present paper aims to show, more humbly, that by highlighting the aesthetic dimension of the practice of gardening we can consider it part of the set of philosophically charged spiritual exercises. (...)
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  30.  2
    David Graeber: Purity, Alienation and Dignity.Charles Herrman - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (2):88-102.
    David Graeber wrote about debt, jobs and the negative effects of globalization. He was an American anthropologist, anarchist activist, and was an author known for his books Debt: The First 5000 Years, The Utopia of Rules and Bullshit Jobs: A Theory. A professor of anthropology at the London School of Economics, he passed away 2 September 2020, at age 59.
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  31.  1
    Philosophy and Meditation. [REVIEW]Charles Herrman & Michael Webb - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (2):126-129.
    Preview: /Review: Michael Webb, The Whole at Once: A Conversation on Meaning, 244 pages./ This is a book about a phenomenological challenge: to reach the depths of meaning. It relies principally on becoming aware of the self and of the core essence of wholes, be they collections of objects or sentences or ideas. But meaning is the end point constituting, according to the author, a drive more powerful even than the will to live. It lies beyond any given perspective. The (...)
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  32.  2
    Philosophy for the Soul.J. P. Rosensweig - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (2):112-125.
    Among the themes this article explores are the following: Can philosophy truly help us in times of crisis? What are the distinctive ways in which philosophy can be therapeutic and provide solace? What possible barriers exist to a person being able to be helped by philosophy? What is it to be genuinely open, to ideas, to life? What are the dynamics of pain and struggle in authentic searching? What is it to see yourself in such searching? What ways of teaching (...)
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  33.  3
    Pressing Questions for the Philosophical Life in a Time of Crisis.Matthew Sharpe, Eli Kramer & Michael Chase - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (2):1-6.
    Preview: 2020, the year the coronavirus pandemic spread globally, marked the twenty-fifth year since the publication of Pierre Hadot’s work Philosophy as a Way of Life. In that time, what began as the research specialization of just a few scholars has become a growing area of philosophical and metaphilosophical inquiry, bringing together researchers from around the globe. Hadot’s key ideas of spiritual exercises, and the very idea of PWL, have been applied to a host of individual thinkers from across the (...)
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  34.  8
    Aesthetic Experience at the Borders of Art and Life: The Case of the Man in Gold.Richard Shusterman - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (2):103-111.
    Preview: Beyond Baumgarten, the modern field of aesthetics can be seen as an attempt to go beyond the limits of older philosophies of beauty, sublimity, and taste in order to engage a much wider domain of qualities and judgments relating to our pleasurable and meaningful experiences of art and nature. The defining strategy of Hegelian aesthetics is to take the essence of aesthetics beyond the limits of nonconceptual sensuous experience and to celebrate instead the idea of art as purveying the (...)
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  35.  2
    Philosophy Plays: A Neo-Socratic Way of Performing Public Philosophy.Edward H. Spence - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (2):35-57.
    This paper provides an explanatory rationale within a theoretical philosophical framework for the Philosophy Plays project as a call to public philosophy, conceived as a way of life and a form of communal therapy for the mind. The Philosophy Plays aim is to introduce philosophy to the general public through philosophical presentations by professional philosophers incorporating drama. Like Plato’s dialogues, the Philosophy Plays, that combine dialectic with rhetoric seek to engage their public audiences in a realistic and shared lived experience, (...)
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  36.  10
    Recovering Wildness: "Earthy" Education and Field Philosophy.Tess Varner - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (2):22-34.
    This essay invites a recovery of "wildness" as a way for philosophers to respond to the present moment which includes: an ongoing global pandemic, economic uncertainty, increasing cultural division, and a crisis in higher education broadly that persistently threatens the status of philosophy programs. Drawing on the American thinkers John William Miller and John Dewey and elaborating on their own philosophical defenses of liberal education, I propose a turn to wildness and freedom in our pedagogies through active and embodied philosophical (...)
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  37.  44
    Dialectic Into Dialogos and the Pragmatics of No-Thingness in a Time of Crisis.John Vervaeke & Christopher Mastropietro - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (2):58-77.
    Nishitani and Neoplatonism both argue that overcoming the nihilism of non-being requires a confrontation with, and cultivation of, the experience of nothingness. This paper argues that the appreciation of nothingness is best realized in the practice of dialectic into dialogos, as adapted from the Socratic tradition. We argue that dialectic equips the self for the confrontation with nihilism, and is best suited to transforming the privative experience of nothingness into a superlative, collective experience of no-thingness. The practice of dialectic into (...)
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  38.  10
    On Tradition and Cultural Memory in Contemporary Art: Theoretical Considerations.Maria Alina Asavei - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (1):126-139.
    This paper starts with a detailed analysis of Jan Assmann’s qualitative distinction between cultural memory and communicative memory. The purpose of this analysis is to highlight both the strengths and the limitations of this seminal distinction, and to also reflect on what cultural theorists and contemporary artists could learn through Assmann’s distinction since artistic production also employs cultural memory formats that do not exclude cultural traditions in their materializations. In line with these considerations, this paper aims to disentangle what “tradition” (...)
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  39.  5
    Which School of Ancient Greco-Roman Philosophy is Most Appropriate for Life in a Time of COVID-19?Michael Chase - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (1):7-31.
    The author argues that ancient Skepticism may be most suited to deal with two crises in the Age of COVID-19: both the physical or epidemiological aspects of the pandemic, and the epistemological and ethical crisis of increasing disbelief in the sciences. Following Michel Bitbol, I suggest one way to mitigate this crisis of faith may be for science to become more epistemically modest, renouncing some of its claims to describe reality as it objectively is, and adopting an “intransitive” rather than (...)
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  40.  11
    Five Principles of Philosophical Health for Critical Times : From Hadot to Crealectics.Luis de Miranda - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (1):70-89.
    In a world described or experienced as unfair, what can philosophical practitioners propose in order to help individuals and communities strive for a meaningful life? One answer, empirically informed by the author’s practice as philosophical counselor in therapeutic, self-care and organizational contexts, is five principles for the cultivation of philosophical health, namely mental heroism, deep orientation, critical creativity, deep listening, and the “Creal”. In the light of Hadot’s rediscovery of philosophy as a way of life and in dialogue with his (...)
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  41.  7
    Living Mindfully Through Crisis: Searching for Life Advice in the “Philosophy-Medicine” of Buddhism.Marc-Henri Deroche - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (1):50-69.
    This paper examines philosophy as a way of life in a time of crisis by focusing on Buddhism, envisioned as a path exercising the faculty of “mindfulness.” From this standpoint of “Buddhist philosophy as mindful exercise,” and following the Kyōto School’s inspiration of engaging a dialogue with Western traditions, including modern psychology and medicine, the paper reflects upon the role of philosophy during this critical period. In response to the contemporary fragmentation of knowledge, it conceives creatively a set of core (...)
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  42.  8
    For the Love of Wisdom.Charles Johnson - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (1):140-145.
    Preview: “America does not think much of its philosophers,” Douglas Anderson writes in his introduction to Philosophy Americana. “We do not teach philosophy in our high schools. A majority in America have no idea what philosophy is about or why it might be interesting, if not important.” Perhaps that lack of appreciation for philosophy is coeval with its beginnings when the ancient Athenians put Socrates to death. Anderson’s lament is clearly present from the supposed birth of Western philosophy, and vividly (...)
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  43. Ancient Philosophical Inspirations for Pandemiconium.Eli Kramer - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (1):1-6.
    Preview: At times, the COVID-19 Pandemic has spent words of their value. We academic philosophers have written many articles in relation to it, and plenty of social media posts, as well as other discourse on it. It all seems effete to stop the flames we have kindled that led to this global tragedy. Our civilizational unsustainability and instability have borne down on us the last year and a half, and at times it seems to reveal a dire fall. There is (...)
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  44.  4
    Through a Glass, Darkly: The Struggle of Perfecting Humanity.Laura Mueller - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (1):162-168.
    Preview: /Review: Jennifer A. Herdt, Forming Humanity: Redeeming the German Bildung Tradition, 312 pages./ Jennifer A. Herdt’s book Forming Humanity: Redeeming the German Bildung Tradition traces the post-Kantian secularization of Bildung from its roots in Pietism through its development into the human autocracy of Herder and Goethe, to the reconciliation and expression of the concept in Hegel. In the journey through the history of Bildung, Herdt specifically focuses on the role of Christianity in human formation, the tension between human formation (...)
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  45.  6
    Gödel, Wittgenstein and the Sensibility of Platonism.Marcin Poręba - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (1):108-125.
    The paper presents an interpretation of Platonism, the seeds of which can be found in the writings of Gödel and Wittgenstein. Although it is widely accepted that Wittgenstein is an anti-Platonist the author points to some striking affinities between Gödel’s and Wittgenstein’s accounts of mathematical concepts and the role of feeling and intuition in mathematics. A version of Platonism emerging from these considerations combines realism with respect to concepts with a view of concepts as accessible to feeling and able to (...)
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  46.  4
    Another Kind of Octopus.Lucio Angelo Privitello - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (1):90-107.
    Philosophy nurtures its actuality from questions, or a call that comes from and leads to a lived risk. This paper embraces that risk in directly responding to nine of the fifteen questions in the Call for Papers for the issue, Philosophy as a Way of Life in a Time of Crisis. Attentive to the idea of PWL, I listened for each question’s latent placement from seasoned historical thinkers. From that, I assigned the order of the questions. Each question served as (...)
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  47.  10
    A Good Person for a Crisis? On the Wisdom of the Stoic Sage.Matthew Sharpe - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (1):32-49.
    Is the Stoic sage a possible or desirable ideal for contemporary men and women, as we enter into difficult times? Is he, as Seneca presents him, the very best person for a crisis? In order to examine these questions, Part 1 begins from what Irene Liu calls the “standard” modern conceptions of the sage as either a kind of epistemically perfect, omniscient agent, or else someone in possession of a specific arsenal of theoretical knowledge, especially concerning the physical world. We (...)
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  48.  5
    Situating Narrative and Systematic Accounts of Wisdom.Kevin C. Taylor - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (1):155-161.
    Preview: /Review: Steven Collins, Wisdom as a Way of Life: Theravāda Buddhism Reimagined, 304 pages./ Steven Collins was in the process of finalizing his manuscript and final academic work on Buddhism when he passed away unexpectedly at the age of sixty-six in February 2018. Although unfinished, the manuscript was in circulation among his colleagues and was near to completion. The final published version suffers hardly at all except for a somewhat abrupt end that one imagines would have seen a few (...)
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  49.  11
    Frost and Snow.Jan Zwicky - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (1):146-154.
    Why awaken the soul to justice if the only result can be to increase awareness of the futility of aspiring to justice in the world? Zwicky documents challenges to the belief that teaching philosophy will result in a fairer polity and suggests that perception of being’s integrity sustains pursuit of philosophy as a way of life.
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  50.  9
    To Serve Man? Rod Serling and Effective Destining.Randall E. Auxier - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 4 (4):190-204.
    Popular culture is a vital part of the philosophy of culture. Immersion in the world of popular culture provides an immanent understanding, and after all, some of what is merely popular culture today will be the high culture of tomorrow. The genre of science fiction is one of the more important and durable forms of cultural and social criticism. Science fiction narratives guide our imaginations into the relation between the might-be and the might-have-been. The central idea of this paper is (...)
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  51.  15
    Moral of the Novel: Rorty and Nussbaum on the Ethical Role of Literature.Maciej Bednarski - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 4 (4):175-189.
    This paper’s aim is to provide a new interpretation of Martha C. Nussbaum’s and Richard Rorty’s views on the ethical role of literature. I pursue this aim in a threefold manner. First of all, I shortly discuss and provide a critique of previous comparisons by other authors. Afterwards, based on the presented critique of other comparisons, I present concise summaries of their respective views. Finally, I propose a double context for interpreting and assessing their views together. The main claim of (...)
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  52.  11
    Derrida’s Umbrapolitics: Marrano “Living Together”.Agata Bielik-Robson - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 4 (4):63-82.
    This essay focuses on political implications of Derrida’s messianicité as a form of Marrano messianism: a universal vision of community “out of joints” which, despite its disjointedness and inner separation, nonetheless addresses itself as “we”. By referring to the generalized “Marrano experience” – the fate of those Sephardic Jews who were forced to convert to Christianity and, in consequence, became neither Jewish nor Christian – Derrida takes the Marrano as his paradigmatic political figure of a “rogue” who escapes every identity (...)
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  53.  12
    The Primacy of Practice.Przemysław Bursztyka - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 4 (4):1-6.
    Preview: The status of philosophy of culture seems to be notoriously unclear. Since its birth as a methodologically self-aware discipline, it constantly provokes controversies and questions concerning its nature, scope, and objective field of cognitive interests. Is it to be conceived – as it was intended by Wilhelm Dilthey – as a kind of philosophical foundation for Geisteswissenschaften and even more specifically for Kulturwissenschaften – in which case it would play a parallel role to philosophy of science in its relation (...)
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  54.  14
    The Transcendental-Phenomenological Ontology of Persons and the Singularity of Love.James G. Hart - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 4 (4):136-174.
    Reference to persons with personal pronouns raises the issue of the primary referent and its nature. “I” does not refer to a property or cluster of properties. This contrasts with our identifying grasp of persons. A person is a radical singularity and thus stands in contrast to a kind or sortal term. The individuation of persons is not adequately grasped by “definite descriptions” or “eidetic singularities.” In spite of the seeming possibility of persons being wholly identical in terms of properties, (...)
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  55.  20
    Toward a “Cultural Philosophy”: Five Forms of Philosophy of Culture.Jared Kemling - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 4 (4):19-35.
    This work argues that an opportunity is being missed by the philosophical tradition, especially within philosophy of culture: an opportunity not just to philosophize “about” culture, but to embody culture and put it into practice. It argues that philosophy itself is a powerful form of culture – one that needs to be better understood and more explicitly practiced. To highlight this blind spot, the work introduces a distinction between “philosophy of culture,” and “cultural philosophy.” Cultural philosophy should be better explored (...)
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  56.  7
    Polish Philosophy of Culture Today: A Promising Route for Contemporary Philosophy.Eli Kramer - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 4 (4):205-221.
    Preview: It has been my observation that Poland is unique for having a philosophy of culture tradition that has theoretical depth and insight into the origins and role of philosophy, popular breadth throughout Polish philosophy in a variety of departments, institutes and programs, and for its cultural relevancy. Yet, this tradition is largely unknown in philosophy/philosophy of culture circles in the English-speaking world.
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  57.  9
    Modern Socratic Dialogue and Resilient Democracy: Creating the Clearing for an American Bildung.Laura Mueller - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 4 (4):83-104.
    This article puts forth Modern Socratic Dialogue as a pedagogical tool for cultivating an American Bildung. Beginning with Michael Hogue’s work on “resilient democracy,” an associational ethos that is vulnerable and based on our lived uncertainty. To further establish this American Bildung, I investigate what it means to be American. Drawing from the works of Michael Walzer and Gloria Anzaldúa, I establish that “American” means unfinished, pluralistic, and embraces ambiguity. The question of how to cultivate this pluralistic, ambiguous, and vulnerable (...)
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  58.  8
    Lyotard’s Missing Face.Monika Murawska - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 4 (4):222-226.
    Preview: /Review: Piotr Schollenberger, Jednostkowość i wydarzenie. Studia z estetyki Lyotarda, 283 pages./ Piotr Schollenberger’s book entitled Jednostkowość i wydarzenie. Studia z estetyki Lyotarda is a thorough and extensive – nearly 300-page – philosophical analysis of a number of topics selected from the vast, polyphonic and complex body of Jean-François Lyotard’s philosophy. It ought to be noted that Schollenberger does not focus his analysis on themes that prevail in the existing interpretations of the philosophy of Lyotard.
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  59.  8
    Truth, Practice, and Philosophy of Culture.Jean-Michel Salanskis - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 4 (4):7-18.
    The paper offers a glimpse at the diversity of what is labelled Philosophy of Culture, and then brings out some important issues concerning culture. The first section expounds etho-analysis as a way of doing philosophy of culture, introducing the notions of solicitator, sensance and ethos. It also gives an idea of how its program has been conducted with respect to love or truth. Etho-analysis describes the ideal part of culture, interpreting it as revealed by concrete practice. The second section discusses (...)
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  60.  13
    Dialogue with Nature and the Ecological Imperative.Mateusz Salwa - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 4 (4):123-135.
    The aim of the paper is to discuss the idea of dialogue with nature. Even though the idea of dialogue with animals, plants – even objects of inanimate nature – is well known, it has usually been treated as an expression of a naive or folk view. Yet, it has recently gained in importance as an idea that is used to describe an ecological approach to natural environment and tends to be treated as a foundation for an ecological culture. A (...)
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  61.  8
    Max Scheler’s Two Approaches to Philosophy of Culture.Kenneth W. Stikkers - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 4 (4):36-44.
    Max Scheler seems to present two distinct approaches to philosophy of culture. In the early period of his Formalismus in der Ethik und die materiale Wertethik and “Ordo Amoris,” he describes cultures as being defined by their distinct order of value preferencings. In his later period of his “Probleme einer Soziologie des Wissens,” however, Scheler explains the dynamics of culture in terms of the interaction of what he calls “real” and “ideal sociological factors,” rooted in various drives and spirit, respectively. (...)
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  62.  10
    The Two Cultures in Philosophy.Mikołaj Sławkowski-Rode - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 4 (4):105-122.
    In this paper I revisit the debate concerning the distinction, which is sometimes made between “analytic” and “continental” philosophy. I look at the historical context in which the distinction came to prominence in the twentieth century, the reasons why it subsequently declined in popularity, and eventually had begun to be undermined. I argue that the distinction possesses intuitive content, which the recent attempts at exposing it as conceptually flawed fail to account for. I suggest that the intuitive content of the (...)
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