Year:

  1.  9
    UN Human Rights Shaming and Foreign Aid Allocation.Bimal Adhikari - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (2):133-154.
    Does public condemnation or shaming of human rights abuses by the United Nations influence foreign aid delivery calculus across Western donor states? I argue that countries shamed in the United Nations Human Rights Council encourage donor states to channel more aid via international and local non-governmental organizations. Furthermore, I find this effect to be more pronounced with increased media coverage. The findings of this paper suggest that international organizations do influence advanced democracies’ foreign policy. Moreover, the paper also finds that (...)
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  2.  6
    Correction to: Laïcité Unveiled: A Case Study in Human Rights, Religion, and Culture in France.Melanie Adrian - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (2):251-251.
    A Correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12142-021-00616-2.
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  3.  3
    Sustainable Development Goals and Human Rights Edited by Markus Kaltenborn, Markus Krajewski, and Heike Kuhn: Switzerland AG: Springer Nature. Interdisciplinary Studies in Human Rights, Volume 5; 2020.Victoria M. Breting-Garcia - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (2):239-241.
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  4.  2
    Sustainable Development Goals and Human Rights Edited by Markus Kaltenborn, Markus Krajewski, and Heike Kuhn: Switzerland AG: Springer Nature. Interdisciplinary Studies in Human Rights, Volume 5; 2020. [REVIEW]Victoria M. Breting-Garcia - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (2):239-241.
  5.  5
    Normative View of Natural Resources—Global Redistribution or Human Rights–Based Approach?Petra Gümplová - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (2):155-172.
    This paper contrasts conceptions of global distributive justice focused on natural resources with human rights–based approach. To emphasize the advantages of the latter, the paper analyzes three areas: the methodology of normative theorizing about natural resources, the category of natural resources, and the view of the system of sovereignty over natural resources. Concerning the first, I argue that global justice conceptions misconstrue the claims made to natural resources and offer conceptions which are practically unfeasible. Concerning the second, I show that (...)
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  6.  3
    Correction to: Observing Justice at Guantánamo Bay: Human Rights NGOs and Trial Monitoring at the US Military Commissions.Kjersti Lohne - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (2):215-215.
  7.  5
    Observing Justice at Guantánamo Bay: Human Rights NGOs and Trial Monitoring at the US Military Commissions.Kjersti Lohne - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (2):193-213.
    The article critically considers the role of NGOs at the US naval base in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. On the basis of observation of pre-trial hearings for the case against Khalid Sheik Mohammed et al.—those allegedly responsible for the September 11 attacks—the article analyses NGOs as trial monitors of the US military commissions set up to deal with ‘alien unprivileged enemy belligerents’. In spite of continued efforts by human rights NGOs and incremental improvements in the military commissions’ institutional arrangements and practice, (...)
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  8.  9
    Critical Realism, Human Rights, and Emotion: How an Emotive Ontology Can Resolve the Tensions Between Universalism and Relativism.Ben Luongo - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (2):217-238.
    This article demonstrates how critical realism can resolve persistent theoretical debates in the human rights literature. Critical realism is a philosophy of science that proposes a complex ontological framework to study causal relations. Methodological and theoretical decisions in research are always premised on some ontological presumption whether they are explicitly stated or not. However, much of the social sciences follow the discipline’s empiricist orthodoxy which often dismisses ontological inquiry. As a consequence, theoretical and methodological debates persist without scholars recognizing how (...)
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  9.  12
    A Review of Martha Nussbaum’s The Cosmopolitan Tradition: A Noble but Flawed Ideal. [REVIEW]Matt McManus - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (2):243-245.
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  10.  8
    Intervening on Behalf of the Human Right to Health: Who, When, and How?Kathryn Muyskens - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (2):173-191.
    A common understanding of the political function of human rights is as a trigger for international intervention, with states typically understood to be duty bound by these rights claims. The unique character of the human right to health raises some complications for these conventional views. In this paper, I will argue that because of the unique character of the human right to health, intervention on its behalf can be justified not only in response to outright violation, but also due to (...)
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  11.  5
    Rethinking Human Rights: Samuel Moyn. Not Enough. Human Rights in an Unequal World. Cambridge: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2018. 277 pp., $29.95 (ISBN 9780674737563). [REVIEW]Karina Shyrokykh - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (2):247-249.
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  12.  12
    Conceptualizing Corporate Accountability in International Law: Models for a Business and Human Rights Treaty.Nadia Bernaz - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (1):45-64.
    This article conceptualizes corporate accountability under international law and introduces an analytical framework translating corporate accountability into seven core elements. Using this analytical framework, it then systematically assesses four models that could be used in a future business and human rights treaty: the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights model, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights model, the progressive model, and the transformative model. It aims to contribute to the BHR treaty negotiation process by clarifying different options (...)
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  13.  9
    Cosmopolitan Democratic and Communicative Rights: The Danish Cartoons Controversy and the Right to Be Heard, Even Across Borders.Alexander Brown & Sune Lægaard - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (1):23-43.
    During the Danish cartoons controversy in 2005–2006, a group of ambassadors to Denmark representing eleven predominantly Muslim countries requested a meeting with the Danish Prime Minister, Anders Fogh Rasmussen, to protest against the cartoons. Rasmussen interpreted their viewpoint as one of demanding limits to freedom of speech and he ignored their request for a meeting. Drawing on this case study, the article argues that it is an appropriate, and potentially effective, moral criticism of anyone who is in a position of (...)
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  14.  7
    Beyond Due Diligence: the Human Rights Corporation.Benjamin Gregg - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (1):65-89.
    The modern corporation offers significant potential to contribute to the human rights project, in part because it is free from the challenges posed by national sovereignty. That promise has begun to be realized in businesses practicing corporate due diligence with regard to the human rights of persons involved in or affected by those enterprises. Yet due diligence preserves the self-seeking orientation of the conventional corporation and seeks only to protect itself from committing human rights abuses. This approach, typified by the (...)
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  15.  9
    Justifying Limitations on the Freedom of Expression.Gehan Gunatilleke - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (1):91-108.
    The freedom of expression is vital to our ability to convey opinions, convictions, and beliefs, and to meaningfully participate in democracy. The state may, however, ‘limit’ the freedom of expression on certain grounds, such as national security, public order, public health, and public morals. Examples from around the world show that the freedom of individuals to express their opinions, convictions, and beliefs is often imperilled when states are not required to meet a substantial justificatory burden when limiting such freedom. This (...)
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  16.  6
    The Future of International Solidarity in Global Refugee Protection.Obiora Chinedu Okafor - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (1):1-22.
    The main focus of the paper is to reflect analytically on the likely place/role of international solidarity in global refugee protection context in the coming years. Following a short introduction, the paper begins with brief discussions of certain preliminary questions related to the nature of the concept of international solidarity. These discussions are followed by a consideration of some discrete issues related to the “norm/practice chasm” in the operation of international solidarity in global refugee protection. Thereafter, the future of international (...)
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  17.  7
    Aiding and Abetting: U.S. Foreign Assistance and State Violence by Jessica Trisko Darden.Evan W. Sandlin - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (1):129-131.
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  18.  12
    Putting the French Duty of Vigilance Law in Context: Towards Corporate Accountability for Human Rights Violations in the Global South?Almut Schilling-Vacaflor - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (1):109-127.
    The adoption of the French Duty of Vigilance law has been celebrated as a milestone for advancing the transnational business and human rights regime. The law can contribute to harden corporate accountability by challenging the “separation principle” of transnational companies and by obligating companies to report on their duty of vigilance. However, the question of whether the law actually contributes to human rights and environmental protection along global supply chains requires empirically grounded research that connects processes in home and host (...)
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