Year:

  1. Force Inside Identity: Self and Other in Améry’s “On the Necessity and Impossibility of Being a Jew”.Deborah Achtenberg - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (3):173-191.
    In a statement too strong even to summarize his own views, Jean-Paul Sartre famously declares in “Existentialism is a Humanism” that “man is nothing other than what he makes of himself.” It is bad faith, according to him, to attribute what I am to my family, culture, condition, etc., because through awareness of what I am and have been, I can determine whether what I am will continue into the future. Human being, as a result, is nothing but what he (...)
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  2.  1
    Absurd Dignity: The Rebel and His Cause in Améry and Camus.Ingrid Anderson - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (3):74-94.
    In “On the Necessity and Impossibility of Being a Jew,” Jean Améry admits that in Europe, “the degradation of the Jews was...identical with the death threat long before Auschwitz. In this regard, Jean- Paul Sartre, already in...his book Anti-Semite and Jew, offered a few perceptions that are still valid today.” In no uncertain terms, Améry aligns his own project to “describe the...unchanging...condition” of the Reich’s victims with Sartre’s 1946 book on anti-Semitism, a philosophical gesture that was not uncommon for left- (...)
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  3.  2
    The Fifth Antinomy: A Reading of Torture for a Post-Kantian Moral Philosophy.Roy Ben-Shai - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (3):17-37.
    "Where is it decreed that enlightenment must be free of emotion? To me, the opposite seems to be true. Enlightenment can properly fulfill its task only if it sets to work with passion." - Améry, At the Mind's Limits This statement, which concludes the preface to the 1977 reissue of At the Mind’s Limits, conveys the philosophical ambition of the book: to advance the enlightenment project, while revising the way we understand this project. The idea, rejected here by Améry, that (...)
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  4. On Jewish Being: Notes on Jean Améry.Benjamin Andrew - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (3):157-172.
    That the question of identity takes on a sense of urgency, one with its own possibilities and impossibilities, the moment that identity is bound up with death, is hardy surprising. What follows are a series of reflections on the question of identity, Jewish identity, raised by Jean Améry’s remarkable text On the Necessity and Impossibility of Being a Jew. Améry’s text was of course published in the wake of his own experiences as an active member of the resistance, as having (...)
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  5.  2
    Jean Améry, Commemoration and Comparative Engagement.Bernstein Jeffrey - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (3):1-2.
    2016 marks the 50 th Anniversary of the publication of Jean Améry’s collection of essays dealing with his experiences at Auschwitz entitled Jenseits von Schuld und Sühne: Bewältigungsversuche eines Überwältigten. Translated into English as At The Mind’s Limits: Contemplations By A Survivor On Auschwitz And Its Realities, Améry’s collection immediately set a standard for philosophical accounts of the camps that even today remains unchanged. More uncompromising than the texts of Wiesenthal, Levi, Borowski, and Wiesel, Améry’s collection philosophically explores the extreme (...)
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  6.  2
    Améry's Duress.Jeffrey Bernstein - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (3):192-212.
    If truth hurts, this is no doubt because it is often enough forced on us. And the question as to whether the reception of “nice,” “easy” truths is similarly an outcome of coercion negates itself in its very formulation — we do not ask “why are things the way they are?” from a feeling of comfort; the plaintiff cry of “how, then, shall we live?” does not come to us out of a sense of security. Indeed, insofar as truth overtakes (...)
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  7.  1
    Anticipatory Imagination in Aging: Revolt and Resignation in Modern Day France.Drouillard Jill - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (3):56-73.
    “Rien n’arrive ni comme on l’espère, ni comme on le craint. Nothing really happens as we hope it will, nor as we fear it will.” 1 Améry appropriates this quote of Proust to highlight how our imaginative powers can never approach its reality during an extreme event. This failure of what he coins our anticipatory imagination is depicted in his phenomenological account of torture, an event whose extremity is later compared to another embodied experience: that of aging. Equating torture with (...)
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  8. At the Mind’s Limits and German-Jewish Symbiosis: Or, Améry on Guilt and the Possibility of Redemption.Robert Erlewine - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (3):140-156.
    At the 50 th anniversary of the Jean Améry’s Jenseits von Schuld und Sühne: Bewältigungsversuche eines Überwältigten, published in English as At the Mind’s Limits: Contemplations By a Survivor on Auschwitz and its Realities, this work is garnering increased attention in the Anglophone world. Perhaps it should not be surprising that there is increased interest in this book at this moment when our attention is repeatedly drawn to the plight of immigrants and exiles, state sanctioned use of torture, and police (...)
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  9. Pain as Yardstick: Jean Améry.Ilit Ferber - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (3):3-16.
    One of the best known and most widely accepted premises regarding the experience of pain and suffering is its singular, private nature. Pain’s violence isolates us from everything else, embedding us completely within our own suffering so that there is nothing else but pain: no world or objects, no relationship with other people, no past or anticipation of the future. An utter withdrawal. But pain’s isolating force is dual: it affects not only those who suffer, but also those who are (...)
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  10. The Saint and the Cynic: Resentment and Jewishness in Améry, Sloterdijk, and Wyschogrod.Menachem Feuer - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (3):95-116.
    The constellation of pain, resentment, the body, and time – as they exist in the wake of the Enlightenment and in the dawn of a new barbarism - is found throughout the work of Jean Améry and Peter Sloterdijk. Both thinkers were especially influenced by Nietzsche’s readings of resentment, his challenge to the Enlightenment, and his turn to the body as the basis of a new kind of thinking which starts with pain, dwells in irreversible time, and ends with the (...)
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  11. Améry, Arendt, and the Future of the World.Anne O'Byrne - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (3):128-139.
    Of all the terms Jean Améry might have chosen to explain the deepest effects of torture, the one he selected was world. To be tortured was to lose trust in the world, to become incapable of feeling at home in the world. In July 1943, Améry was arrested by the Gestapo in Belgium and tortured by the SS at the former fortress of Breendonk. With the first blow from the torturers, he famously wrote, one loses trust in the world. With (...)
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  12.  4
    A Phenomenology of Home: Jean Améry on Homesickness.Martin Shuster - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (3):117-127.
    As the contemporary nation state order continues to produce genocide and destruction, and thereby refugees, and as the national and international landscape continues to see the existence of refugees as a political problem, Jean Améry’s 1966 essay “How Much Home Does a Person Need?” takes on a curious urgency. I say ‘curious’ because his own conclusions about the essay’s aims and accomplishments appear uncertain and oftentimes unclear. My aim in what follows, then, is twofold. First, I intend to make clear (...)
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  13. ‘A Fine Risk to Be Run’: Améry and Levinas on Aging, Responsibility, and Risk in the Wake of Atrocity.Jill Stauffer - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (3):38-55.
    Does atrocity age? What I mean to ask is, does time heal wounds that were genocidal or otherwise broad, deep, and caused by a fatal combination of human depravity and widespread indifference? Jean Améry famously refused to let the past be past in his essay “Resentments.” He argued that even if, with regard to the Holocaust, logically speaking, what happened is in the past, there is no moral sense to that. Morality requires of us that we refuse to let the (...)
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  14.  1
    Bergson and the Morality of Uncertainty.Adriana Alfaro Altamirano - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (2):41-61.
    Moral and political theories, insofar as they are based on the fragile life of human beings, usually incorporate a reflection on the role of uncertainty or contingency. The question remains however, how exactly do we experience ‘uncertainty’? Can it show us different faces, to which we then react in different ways? If so, what is the meaning of such multiplicity for the exercise of agency? Comparing Bergson’s inquiry into the modern belief in chance with Jean-Marie Guyau’s reflections on the love (...)
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  15. On Bergson's Reformation of Philosophy.Keith Ansell-Pearson - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (2):84-105.
    In this essay I focus on the text Creative Evolution and show that although Bergson intended to make a contribution to the science of biology and to the philosophy of life, the primary aim of the text is to show the need for a fundamental reformation of philosophy. Bergson wants to show how, through an appreciation of the evolution of life, philosophy can expand our perception of the universe. I examine in detail the two essential claims he makes in the (...)
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  16.  1
    Politeness.Henri Bergson - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (2):3-9.
    This is the English translation of a speech Bergson made at Lycée Henri-IV on July 30, 1892. This is an interesting text because it anticipates Bergson’s last book, his The Two Sources of Morality and Religion. Like the distinction in The Two Sources between the open and the closed, “Politeness” defines its subject matter in two ways. There is what Bergson calls “manners” and there is true politeness. For Bergson, both kinds of politeness concern equality. Manners or material politeness amount (...)
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  17.  1
    The Concept in Life and the Life of the Concept: Canguilhem’s Final Reckoning with Bergson.Feldman Alex - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (2):154-175.
    Foucault famously divided the history of twentieth-century French philosophy between a “philosophy of experience” and a “philosophy of the concept,” placing Bergson in the former camp and his teacher Canguilhem in the latter. This division has shaped the Anglophone reception of Canguilhem as primarily a historian and philosopher of biology. Canguilhem, however, was also a philosopher of life and a careful reader of Bergson. The recently-begun publication of Canguilhem’s Œuvres complètes has revealed the depth of this engagement, and a re-reading (...)
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  18.  3
    Solidarity and the Absurd in Kamel Daoud's Meursault, Contre-Enquête.Sarah Horton - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (2):286-303.
    This article examines Kamel Daoud’s treatment of solidarity and the absurd in Meursault, contre-enquête and posits that the question of how to live in solidarity with others is central to the novel, although the word ‘solidarity’ never appears in it. After recalling Camus’s discussion of the absurd in Le Mythe de Sisyphe and of solidarity in L’Homme révolté, the article examines the manner in which Haroun, Daoud’s narrator and the brother of the Arab Meursault killed in L’Étranger, reveals his own (...)
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  19.  2
    Recent Work on Negritude.Chike Jeffers - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (2):304-318.
    Review of recent works on the Negritude movement, with critical remarks and interventions.
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  20. Mysticism and War: Reflections on Bergson and His Reception During World War I.Donna V. Jones - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (2):10-20.
    Once we grasp Bergson’s new conception of an intuitive metaphysics premised on a distance from action, it seems unlikely that a connection could be found between this metaphysics and an activist philosophy of war. In this essay I shall revisit Bergson’s metaphysics to see how they could have been understood to provide support for war. I discuss how Bergson’s metaphysics by way of its number theoretical understanding of oneness was thought to mirror or express the limit experience of war that (...)
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  21.  3
    Beyond Dualism and Monism: Bergson's Slanted Being.Messay Kebede - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (2):106-130.
    There is an old but still unresolved debate pertaining to the question of Bergsonian monism or dualism. Scholars who think that Bergson is ultimately monist clash with those who claim that he has consistently maintained a dualist position. Others speak of contradiction and point out his failure to reconcile dualism with monism. What feeds on the debate is Bergson’s undeniable change of direction: while his first book is flagrantly dualist, his second book takes a sharp turn toward monism. Without denying (...)
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  22. Human Rights and the Leap of Love.Alexandre Lefebvre - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (2):21-40.
    To commemorate the 75 th anniversary of Henri Bergson’s death I present what I believe is his most vital and lasting contribution to political philosophy: his conception of human rights. This article has two goals. The first is to present Bergson’s writings on human rights as clearly and simply as possible, so as to reach the wide audience it deserves. The second is to demonstrate his relevance for contemporary human rights scholarship. To do so, I connect him to recent debates (...)
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  23.  1
    The Cinematic Bergson: From Virtual Image to Actual Gesture.Maoilearca John Ó - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (2):203-220.
    Deleuze’s film-philosophy makes much of the notion of virtual images in Bergson’s Matter and Memory, but in doing so he transforms a psycho-meta-physical thesis into a unBergsonian ontological one. In this essay, we will offer a corrective by exploring Bergson’s own explanation of the image as an “attitude of the body”—something that projects an actual, corporeal, and postural approach, not only to cinema, but also to philosophy. Indeed, just as Renoir famously said that “a director makes only one movie in (...)
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  24. Bergson Remembered: A Roundtable.eds Mark William Westmoreland and Brien Karas - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (2):221-258.
    Bergson Remembered: A Roundtable Curated by Mark William Westmoreland with Brien Karas Featuring Jimena Canales, Stephen Crocker, Charlotte De Mille, Souleymane Bachir Diagne, Michael Foley, Hisashi Fujita, Suzanne Guerlac, Melissa McMahon, Paulina Ochoa Espejo, and Frédéric Worms.
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  25.  3
    Beauvoir's Reading of Biology in The Second Sex.David M. Peña-Guzmán - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (2):259-285.
    This article offers a systematic treatment of Beauvoir's reading of biology in The Second Sex. Following Gatens 's suggestion that this chapter has not received the scholarly consideration it demands and deserves, it explains key aspects of Beauvoir's relationship to biological reason by re-telling the story of Beauvoir's early life from the perspective of her scientific education, rationally reconstructing her argument in the chapter on "Biological Data," and exploring the philosophical orientation of her argument using the Frankfurt School model of (...)
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  26.  1
    The Intuitive Recommencement of Metaphysics.Camille Riquier - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (2):62-83.
    If we are to understand the complex relationship between Bergson and Kant, we must not approach the former’s philosophy as if it could only be either pre-critical or post-Kantian. Instead, the present essay seeks to shed light on this relationship by treating Kant as another “missing precursor of Bergson.” In Bergson’s eyes, Kant, like Descartes, contains two possible paths for philosophy, which reflect the two fundamental tendencies that are mixed together in the élan vital and continued in humankind: intuition and (...)
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  27.  3
    Darkened Counsel: The Problem of Evil in Bergson’s Metaphysics of Integral Experience.Anthony Paul Smith - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (2):131-153.
    Henri Bergson's work is often presented as an optimistic philosophy. This essay presents a counter-narrative to that reading by looking to the place of the problem of evil within his integral metaphysics. For, if Bergson’s philosophy is simply optimistic, or simply derives meaning from the wholeness of experience, then it risks a theodical structure which undercuts its ability to speak to contemporary social and political problems of suffering. A theodical structure is one that, at bottom, justifies the experience of suffering (...)
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  28. Bergson Before Bergsonism: Traversing “Bergson’s Failing” in Susanne K. Langer’s Philosophy of Art.Iris van der Tuin - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (2):176-202.
    How did the philosophy of Henri Bergson look before Gilles Deleuze’s Bergsonism? This article provides a situated answer to that question by performing a close reading of Susanne K. Langer’s early engagement with Bergson in her monograph Feeling and Form from 1953. Both Bergson and Langer argue against polemical philosophizing. Such polemical modes of doing philosophy distort insight into the thought of the philosophers in question and in philosophical questions per se. My reading of Langer’s Bergson is therefore infused with (...)
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  29. Introduction: 75 Years Later.Mark William Westmoreland - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (2):1-2.
    Introduction to the volume commemorating 75 years since the death of Henri Bergson.
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  30.  2
    Introduction: The Responsibility of Awkwardness.Nicolette Bragg - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (1):1-8.
    The thought of the limit has in its genetics the questioning of time and place. The essays in this collection, African Thinking and/at Its Limits, demonstrate this essential interrogation ; their address of the limits of African thinking is inevitably also one that presents us with the limitedness of temporal and spatial understandings. For the limit signals the very reach of time and place, and enables the possibility of territory, control, management, and measure – possibilities that can seem at once (...)
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  31. Alain Badiou’s Suturing of the Law to the Event and the State of Exception.Antonio Calcagno - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (1):192-204.
    This article questions whether we can posit a more radical desuturing of the law from the event: Can radical shifts in law produce events? Can the law itself be an event, thereby conditioning the very nature of the event itself, creating a new subjectivity and a new time? I would like to argue that the law can do so. How? Badiou begins “The Three Negations” by discussing the work of the German jurist Carl Schmitt. I would like to argue that (...)
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  32. Senghor's Anxiety of Influence.E. Drabinski John - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (1):68-80.
    An examination of the question of influence in Senghor's work, with particular attention to the concept of assimilation - which I argue allows Senghor to responsibly adopt notions from French vitalist and life-philosophy traditions, despite their close ties to colonial and imperial histories.
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  33.  3
    Is There a Flesh Without Body?Emmanuel Falque - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (1):139-166.
    This paper was originally presented at a colloquium on Michel Henry’s book Incarnation at the Institut Catholique Paris. Michel Henry’s response to the present study can be found in “À Emmanuel Falque,” in Ph énoménologie et christianisme chez Michel Henry, ed. Ph. Capelle : 168-182. This response was reprinted recently in Michel Henry, La Ph énoménologie de la vie, vol. 5.
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  34. Alterity is a Negative Concept of the Same.Grant Farred - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (1):9-24.
    Philosophical anthropology is a tradition that is as old as philosophy itself, so much so that it might be said to be indistinguishable from philosophy itself. Philosophical anthropology, extending as it does from Socrates to Sartre, best describes the work of V.Y. Mudimbe. Anthropology, broadly conceived as the science that studies human origins, the material and cultural development of humanity, is always Mudimbe’s first line of philosophical inquiry. It is certainly Mudimbe’s interest in anthropology that allows him to conduct his (...)
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  35. Statues Also Die.Pierre-Philippe Fraiture - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (1):45-67.
    “African thinking,” “African thought,” and “African philosophy.” These phrases are often used indiscriminately to refer to intellectual activities in and/or about Africa. This large field, which sits at the crossroads between analytic philosophy, continental thought, political philosophy and even linguistics is apparently limitless in its ability to submit the object “Africa” to a multiplicity of disciplinary approaches. This absence of limits has far-reaching historical origins. Indeed it needs to be understood as a legacy of the period leading to African independence (...)
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  36. On the Concepts of Disorder, Retraditionalization, and Crisis in African Studies.Kasereka Kavwahirehi - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (1):101-115.
    Over the last two decades, concepts of “disorder as political instrument in Africa,” “politics of belly,” and “re-traditionalization” have been used and reused in African studies by European and African scholars to describe the African social and political condition of the last decades. However, despite their canonization, one can question their efficiency and relevance to the analysis and understanding of what is really happening in postcolonial Africa. One might even wonder if these analytical concepts are not reawakening the imaginary of (...)
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  37.  2
    Between Earth and Sky.Jean-Paul Martinon - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (1):25-44.
    Africa. Who are you? I deliberately don’t say here, “What are you?” As we know, the interrogative pronoun “what” is an attempt to grab the essence of something. As Heidegger says: “whatness [ Wassein ], comprises what one commonly calls… the idea or mental representation by means of which we propose to… grasp what a thing is.” As such, questions starting with the interrogative pronoun “what” are eminently violent because they reduce the object of inquiry to a thing that can (...)
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  38.  2
    The Affect of Dissident Language and Aesthetic Emancipation at the Margins: A Possible Dialogue Between Theodor W. Adorno and Julia Kristeva.Marcia Morgan - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (1):167-191.
    In this paper I focus on the interaction between affect and language as articulated in the works of Theodor W. Adorno and Julia Kristeva, sometimes in inchoate and non-explicit ways. Language is always in transit, exile, and dispossession. All language is the language of another, or the other, and precisely because of this, it is the site of dissenting and conflicting affect. In this context, my paper traces a missed but necessary dialogue between Adorno and Kristeva. Adorno’s diagnosis of failed (...)
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  39. Frantz Fanon: Philosophy, Praxis, and the Occult Zone.Richard Pithouse - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (1):116-138.
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  40.  1
    Active Viewership and Ethical Representation: Responsible Spectatorship in Alfredo Jaar’s “Real Pictures” and Gil Courtemanche’s Un Dimanche À la Piscine À Kigali.Angela Ritter - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (1):205-223.
    In its discussion of Gil Courtemanche’s Un dimanche à la piscine à Kigali and Alfredo Jaar’s installation of “Real Pictures,” both of which are representations of the Rwandan Genocide, this analysis contributes to a larger discussion on ethical representations of violence. Generally the discussion of the ethics of representation analyzes the ways in which the author or artist portrays the violent events. It focuses on the importance of the historical and political context when describing the events, as well as on (...)
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  41.  1
    Against African Communalism.Olúfẹ́mi Táíwò - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (1):81-100.
    Communalism and its cognates continue to exercise a vise grip on the African intellectual imaginary. Whether the discussion is in ethics or social philosophy, in metaphysics or even, on occasion, epistemology, the play of communalism, a concept expounded in the next section, is so strong that it is difficult to escape its ubiquity. In spite of this, there is little serious analysis of the concept and its implications in the contemporary context. Yet, at no other time than now can a (...)
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  42.  3
    The Problem of Choice: Existence and Transcendence in the Philosophy of Jaspers.Jean Wahl - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (1):224-258.
    English translation of Jean Wahl, “Le Problème du choix: L’existence et la transcendance dans la philosophie de Jaspers,” Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 41, 3, 405–44; republished in Jean Wahl, Études kierkegaardiennes, 510–52.
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