Common Knowledge

ISSN: 0961-754X

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  1.  4
    All That We Wish for Now Is the Recognition of Our Pain.Alex Averbuch, Oksana Maksymchuk & Max Rosochinsky - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (3):309-316.
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  2.  3
    Against Antiformalism.Michael Braddick - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (3):342-366.
    This contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Antipolitics” explores the place of legal agency in the political thought and activities of John Lilburne, one of the leading English Levellers of the seventeenth century. Protection of his rights as a freeborn Englishman was central to his political campaigns and political thought and was an important element of his published Leveller tracts. Much commentary on the Levellers has emphasized their demand for annual parliaments elected on a broad franchise and equal distribution of (...)
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  3.  2
    Raymond Williams's Unusual Combination.Peter Burke - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (3):400-402.
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  4.  5
    Aggiornamento for the Twenty-First Century.Caroline Walker Bynum - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (3):393-395.
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  5.  1
    Politics, Academic and Ancient.Paul Cartledge - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (3):385-389.
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  6.  3
    Antipolitics and the Administrative State.Cary Coglianese & Daniel E. Walters - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (3):367-382.
    This contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Antipolitics” A considers what it might mean for the administrative state to be antipolitical. Two conceptions of an antipolitical administrative state are identified. The first of these—antipolitics as in opposition to administrative discretion—holds that, in a democracy, value judgments should be made only by elected officials and that all administrators should do is carry out technical tasks calling for expertise. Administrators, however, inevitably make policy decisions that call for value judgments, making this first (...)
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  7.  6
    Varieties of Nonreading.Thibault De Meyer - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (3):403-404.
    Bayard's book appeared in 2007. Word of mouth about it probably reached me at the time, but it did not catch my attention until the day (in 2012, if I am not mistaken) that a young professor, on the verge of burnout, told me how reading it had functioned for him as a kind of therapy. Though a voracious reader, he found himself confronted by ever more recommendations for reading, some from reviewers whose suggestions were felt as obligations and sounded (...)
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  8.  4
    Why Russian Philosophy Is So Important and So Dangerous.Mikhail Epstein - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (3):405-409.
    The academic community in the West tends to be suspicious of Russian philosophy, often relegating it to another category, such as “ideology” or “social thought.” But what is philosophy? There is no simple universal definition, and many thinkers consider it impossible to formulate one. The most credible attempt is nominalistic: philosophy is the practice in which Plato and Aristotle were involved. As Alfred North Whitehead wrote, “The safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a (...)
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  9.  3
    C. S. Lewis.Charles Foster - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (3):390-392.
    Lewis was not, and is not, very popular in the academy. I think there are three reasons.First, he did not stick to his subject, which was medieval and Renaissance literature. He wrote highly successful children's books, theological works, and articles accessible to nonspecialists, and was an acclaimed broadcaster. All this allowed his critics to suggest that he was not a proper academic, because proper academics do not throw their nets so wide.Second, he was good at everything he did (except perhaps (...)
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  10.  3
    Nabokov's Gorgeous, Empty Shell.Inbar Graiver - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (3):398-399.
    Lucette's suicide left me indifferent. This time I knew it was coming, but years ago, when I first read Ada, or Ardor, I also felt relatively indifferent (apart from the element of surprise) to learn about her sudden death. I was aware of my indifference at the time and was surprised at my (non)reaction. It surprised me yet again in my recent rereading of the novel. Manipulating and withholding the reader's engagement with the text and empathy toward a character may (...)
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  11.  2
    On Rereading Snow.Allan Janik - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (3):396-397.
    When I first read Snow, I was deeply conscious, page by page, of its enormously dense character. It was clear from the outset that this novel was much more than the account of a Westernized Turkish journalist's failed attempt to cover a suicide wave among young girls in the provincial Turkish city of Kars. Almost from the start, the multidimensional narrative about Turkish youth weaved together all sorts of strains of political, religious, and social conflicts in a drama about coming (...)
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  12.  3
    Introduction: Antipolitics or Antinomianism?Jeffrey M. Perl - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (3):317-323.
    In this introduction to part 3 of the Common Knowledge symposium “Antipolitics,” the journal's editor argues that, apart from sortition, the best guarantees of safety in a democracy are, first, to augment judicial oversight of all political processes and, second, to exclude politicians from the process of selecting judges. “There can never be too much judicial interference,” he writes, “in what politicians regard as their domain.” The author reached this conclusion during attempts by the newly elected Israeli government, in the (...)
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  13.  2
    The Innocence of the Past.Colin Richmond - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (3):383-384.
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  14.  2
    Can Classical Athens Offer Lessons for a Large, Pluralistic Society?Jennifer T. Roberts - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (3):324-341.
    Recoiling from the power that Athenian democracy placed in the hands of the poor, the founding fathers of the United States took Athens as primarily an anti-model, whereas nineteenth-century defenders of slavery found Athens a very congenial model indeed, seeming as it did to lend a mantle of legitimacy to an unspeakable practice. After a “honeymoon period” in which democracy was idealized as the only legitimate form of government, now at the outset of the twenty-first century the alliance of democracy (...)
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  15.  6
    Bruno Latour.Isabelle Stengers - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (3):283-308.
    This memorial to Latour is not an appraisal of his fifty-year research career but the report of a traveling companion with a story to share about the apparent lack of continuity, the sudden, unapologetic, unprincipled changes of position, with which he surprised or scandalized his colleagues and readers. In the first place, was he a sociologist, an anthropologist, a philosopher? Though he did not make lasting commitments of that kind, he did make deeper ones that did not change—above all, never (...)
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  16. Samuel Butler's Contributions to Biological Philosophy.Barry Allen - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (2):251-279.
    Samuel Butler is usually remembered for Erewhon, widely considered among the best English satires. He also contributed to philosophical biology in works that collectively compose the nineteenth century's finest statement of the evolutionary argument associated with the name of Lamarck. In writing on evolution, Butler was not presenting science for a popular audience but deliberately intervening in the scientific argument about Darwinism. Surprised by the success of his first venture in philosophical biology, Life and Habit, Butler committed himself to the (...)
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  17.  12
    The Culture of Samizdat: Literature and Underground Networks in the Late Soviet Union.Carol Any - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (2):242-244.
    Samizdat, the underground circulation of unofficial and forbidden literature in the Soviet Union, is an example of how censorship can backfire. Ideological restrictions produced walls of monotony in libraries and bookstores, propelling readers to search for more interesting fare. Sensitive texts on religion, philosophy, human rights, and current events, as well as literary works, passed from hand to hand clandestinely from around 1960 until censorship was abolished in the late 1980s. Von Zitzewitz's study is itself interesting fare, uncovering the workings (...)
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  18.  27
    How to Do Things with Emotions: The Morality of Anger and Shame across Cultures.Andrew Beatty - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (2):236-239.
    Publishers love titles that begin How or Why. Better still, How and Why, combining edification with utility. The target group is that overlap between the self-help audience and the idly curious—which is to say, most of us. And since emotions are very much about self-help and self-harm, they offer rich pickings in a burgeoning market. Flanagan's How to Do things with Emotions is a philosopher's take on moral emotions, the allusion to J. L. Austin's How to Do Things with Words (...)
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  19.  11
    Ignorance, Irrationality, Elections, and Sortition Part 2.Terrill G. Bouricius - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (2):206-223.
    Part 1 of this article, which appeared in the first installment of the Common Knowledge symposium “Antipolitics,” presented reasons why elections are an inappropriate method for selecting representatives in a democracy. Part 2, published in the symposium's second installment, offers arguments for why sortition — the selection of shorter-duration representatives by lottery from the general population — is the best procedure for democracy. Random selection can assure broad diversity and descriptive representation, and it allows those people selected to overcome the (...)
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  20.  14
    Antipolitics: Populism (Not) in Ancient Athens.Paul Cartledge - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (2):187-192.
    As part of the Common Knowledge symposium “Antipolitics” — which concerns the present confrontation and confusion of democracy and populism — this essay begins from the observation that populism is a word of Latin, not Greek, derivation. The Roman populus did not have the independent democratic power of the Athenian demos, though both words can be translated as “people.” Whereas today, in representative democracies, the conflict of populism and democracy can and does do serious damage to the latter, under the (...)
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  21.  7
    Devenir autre: Hétérogénéité et plasticité du soi.Thibault De Meyer - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (2):233-234.
    Barba non facit philosophum. L'habit ne fait pas le moine. In those proverbs, Latin and French, we find the classical opposition between appearance and reality—between the accessory (the superficial, the beard, the clothing) and the essential (the profound, the philosopher, the monk), the latter being independent from and unchanged by the former. Berliner questions this dichotomy. As an anthropologist, he reviews many situations in which humans wear masks or use other techniques to cover their identities: cosplaying, puppy play, historical reenactments, (...)
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  22.  17
    Socrates and Sortition.Paul Demont - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (2):193-205.
    In consonance with the view of Aristotle in book 4 of the Politics, Montesquieu wrote that “selection by lot is in the nature of democracy; election by choice is in the nature of aristocracy.” Although the drawing of lots was a marker of classical Athenian democracy, Socrates — according to Xenophon's Memorabilia — was strongly opposed to it as irrational. According to Socrates and Plato, the citizen of a democracy exists in a moral anarchy, and every choice he makes is (...)
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  23.  11
    Introduction: Telling the Untold Story of Random Political Recruitment.Oliver Dowlen - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (2):173-186.
    Introducing part 2 of the Common Knowledge symposium “Antipolitics,” this essay summarizes the “untold story” of the random recruitment of citizens for political office in Western Europe. Although sortition was used extensively in ancient Athens and in late medieval Europe, it is now (except for the randomly selected jury) a largely discontinued practice. While a good deal is known about when and where this procedure was used, there is little surviving documentation of exactly why it was used and of what (...)
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  24.  15
    The Politics of Apocalypse.Mikhail Epstein - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (2):141-172.
    This guest column examines the historical fate of Russia in its catastrophic confrontation with Ukraine and the West. The piece considers the negative self-definitions of Russia that have arisen in the aftermath of the communist utopia and its virtual transformation into an anti-world — a society whose purpose is to undermine and destroy. Emerging Russian cults of war, death, and apocalypticism are stressed, as are the paradoxes and inversions by which Russia, in attempting to become stronger, becomes weaker and indeed (...)
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  25.  11
    In the Eye of the Wild.Charles Foster - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (2):245-246.
    Martin was a twenty-nine-year-old anthropologist working on animism in Siberia when a bear leaped on her. He raked her with his claws, put her head into his mouth, and was about to crush her skull when she stabbed him with her ice axe. He loped off into the woods, carrying part of Martin's lower jaw and, if Martin is right, half of her soul—but leaving half of his soul in return. Martin lay bleeding in the snow. She managed to fashion (...)
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  26.  11
    Revisiting Susanne Langer's Philosophy in a New Key—Again.Howard Earl Gardner - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (2):247-250.
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  27.  14
    Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught Early Christian Monks—and What It Can Teach Us.Inbar Graiver - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (2):244-245.
    A strange fusion of history and autobiography, this study ranges across the themes of sound and silence, solitude and desert, community and home, combining the past and the present, the historical and the personal, in a unique way. Driven by the conviction that “our sounding world deeply shapes our sense of place and of who we are,” Haines-Eitzen, a scholar of early Christianity, seeks to understand how early monasticism was shaped by the soundscape of the Middle Eastern deserts, but also (...)
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  28.  14
    “Bringing Flowers Home” and Other Poems.Rachel Hadas - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (2):224-232.
    Bringing Flowers HomeWe try to put a bandage on the wound,offering a vague apology:Forgive me, distant wars, for bringing flowers home.Towers turn out to have been built on sand.Regimes collapse. No use in asking whywe ripped the bandage off that bleeding wound.An earthquake followed by a hurricane,fires, floods: they've passed some of us by.Us. And who is we? And what is home?Last week an enormous yellow moonhung low in a corner of the sky.Beauty is no bandage for the wound,hole in (...)
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  29.  14
    Genealogies of Music and Memory: Gluck in the Nineteenth-Century Parisian Imagination.James H. Johnson - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (2):239-241.
    The music of Christoph Willibald von Gluck was a revolution for Paris operagoers when his work premiered there in 1774. In a setting known for its restive and often rowdy spectators, Alceste, Iphigénie en Aulide, and Orpheé et Eurydice seized audiences with unprecedented force. They shed silent tears or sobbed openly, and some cried out in sympathy with the sufferers onstage. “Oh Mama! This is too painful!” three girls called out as Charon led Alcestis to the underworld, and a boy (...)
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  30.  8
    Books in My LifeAmerican Publishing History: The Tanselle Collection.Jeffrey M. Perl - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (2):241-242.
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  31.  12
    The Philosophy of Modern Song.Belle Randall - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (2):234-236.
    The Philosophy of Modern Song: curious title, a curious book. If you bought it, as I did, because you are a devoted Dylan fan, hoping to find new Dylan songs inside, or at least new Dylan prose, you will be disappointed. In the photo of three musicians on the cover, none of them is Dylan. The one on the left is Little Richard. Who are the other two? Nowhere are we told their names, nor the names of the people in (...)
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  32.  8
    To Break Russia's Chains: Boris Savinkov and His Wars against the Tsar and the Bolsheviks.Anthony Anemone - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):129-130.
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  33.  13
    Infrathin: An Experiment in Micropoetics.Charles Bernstein - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):113-116.
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  34.  26
    Inheriting Rorty.Anders Blok & Casper Bruun Jensen - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):41-58.
    This contribution to the second installment of the Common Knowledge symposium “Whatever Happened to Richard Rorty?” argues that the field of science studies should be understood as a way of inheriting, rather than fundamentally breaking with, Rorty's antifoundationalism and postepistemology. Taken together, the work of Bruno Latour, Isabelle Stengers, and Donna Haraway has been less about rebalancing the relative and the objective, and more about redrawing the checkerboard of knowledge into “in-disciplinary” styles of empirical philosophy. These styles rely on doubly (...)
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  35.  10
    Promises and Perils of Rortian Conversation.James J. Bono - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):25-40.
    As a contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Whatever Happened to Richard Rorty?,” this essay elucidates how Isabelle Stengers's signature idea of an “ecology of practices” offers a way to establish claims to expertise and—within limits that are, in effect, the limits of specific scientific practices—claims of authority within science that Rorty would have denied. The problems facing Rorty's understanding of science also imperil his vision of a society admirably seeking to realize what he calls “social hope.” Once again, Stengers's (...)
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  36.  14
    Asceticism of the Mind: Forms of Attention and Self-Transformation in Late Antique Monasticism.Caroline Walker Bynum - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):110-112.
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  37.  9
    The Restless Republic: Britain without a Crown.Bernard Capp - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):128-129.
    Britain's “restless republic” survived for only eleven turbulent years, from 1649 to 1660. Britain today is a somewhat restless monarchy, troubled from within by two turbulent and disgruntled royal princes, Andrew and Harry, and from without by considerable public unease. If the two princes had been firstborns rather than younger brothers, and in the direct line of succession, the long-term future of the monarchy would look very uncertain. Charles I, stubborn and inept, was a younger brother too. Had his very (...)
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  38.  13
    The Cambridge Centenary Ulysses: The 1922 Text with Essays and Notes.William M. Chace - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):118-120.
    It weighs in at a bit more than five pounds; its dimensions demand a cradle. Yet this book is a handsome and welcome achievement despite its bulk. Its reproduction of the 1922 text, its maps and photos of 1904 Dublin; its list of minor characters in Ulysses; its bibliography of scholarship, both old and new; its timeline of Joyce's life, and its exemplary detailed annotations of the text: everything, harvested from the best sources, has been brought together to create the (...)
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  39.  10
    Un autre monde possible: Gilles Deleuze face aux perspectivismes contemporains.Thibault De Meyer - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):109-110.
    In 1996, the anthropologist Eduardo Viveiros de Castro chose a sentence by Gilles Deleuze as the epigraph for an article, published in the Brazilian journal Mana, on Amerindian perspectivism. (A modified version of the article appeared in English two years later, in the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute.) Since then, Deleuze's name has appeared often in works about perspectivism, but Chamois's new book is the first monograph to focus on perspectivism and Deleuze. Among the most important contributions of Chamois's (...)
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  40.  8
    Vesper Flights: New and Collected Essays.Thibault De Meyer - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):134-135.
    This book comprises forty-one essays, some of them about solar eclipses, space stations, mushrooms, and refugees, but the majority focus on animals, mostly birds. Macdonald starts each piece with a personal recollection from childhood or adulthood. “Vesper Flights,” for instance—the essay that gives the book its title—begins: “I found a dead swift once, a husk of a bird under a bridge over the River Thames.... I picked it up, held it in my palm... and realised that I didn't know what (...)
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  41.  7
    La Fontaine.Thibault De Meyer - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):122-124.
    In French schools, La Fontaine is presented as “the height of French culture,” but he was only marginally inspired by French poets. His main sources were Spanish and Italian authors, as well as classics of both the Occident and Orient. In this way La Fontaine exemplifies, for Serres, a general pattern in which “cultures grow at the crossroads of other cultures.” One's identity develops out of numerous contacts with others, by learning from them and assimilating some of their qualities—by being (...)
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  42.  15
    Around the Day in Eighty Worlds: Politics of the Pluriverse.Thierry Drumm - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):106-107.
    In the beginning, Savransky's book offers a copious list of many worlds that we may or may not inhabit or even know about: a world where the dead are persons with whom the living confer, a world where part of the year the sun never sets, a world where sorcery-lions stalk their victims, a world where fictional characters give advice to novel readers, a world where immortal fungi live in disturbed forests, and and and (without end). This is a “world (...)
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  43.  8
    Intellectual Life and Literature at Solovki, 1923–1930: The Paris of the Northern Concentration Camps.Caryl Emerson - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):130-133.
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  44.  10
    The Rise and Fall of the Emerald Tigers: Ten Years of Research in Panna National Park.Charles Foster - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):120-121.
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  45.  16
    Rorty Reframed.Steve Fuller - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):86-101.
    Richard Rorty is easily cast as the intellectual godfather of our post-truth condition. But unlike Nicholas Gaskill, whose article in Common Knowledge 28, no. 3, has engendered a continuing symposium in the journal, Professor Fuller sees Rorty's role as being to his credit rather than detriment. Rorty extended W. B. Gallie's idea of “essentially contested concepts” from the moral and political spheres to the epistemic, thereby rendering such terms as truth, reason, and evidence inherently vague, which means that they are (...)
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  46.  12
    Iconoclasm as Child's Play.Dario Gamboni - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):107-108.
    In the summer of 1985 my children, Laura and Aurélien, then seven and five, knelt before a Barbie doll standing at the foot of a Ken doll on an imaginary cross. I remember vividly the scene because I took a picture of it. We were vacationing in Ticino and visiting the local churches, so I assumed that this play imitated the iconography to which they were being exposed. After reading Moshenska's Iconoclasm as Child's Play, however—whose cover shows “Josh McBig,” a (...)
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  47.  11
    The First Pagan Historian: The Fortunes of a Fraud from Antiquity to the Enlightenment.Simon Goldhill - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):125-126.
    In this impressive first book, Clark explores the extraordinary history of the Destruction of Troy by Dares the Phrygian. Dares's account of the fall of Troy is a short, Latin prose narrative that claims to be an eyewitness account of the Trojan War, translated from the Phrygian by Cornelius Nepos, the Roman historian, and sent to Sallust, another, even more famous Roman historian. Dares's text came to light as late antiquity turned into the medieval era, and Dares was promptly hailed (...)
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  48.  12
    From Rorty to Gaia.Jan Golinski - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):59-71.
    This contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Whatever Happened to Richard Rorty?” endorses Nicholas Gaskill's analysis of Rorty's limited legacy in the field of science and technology studies. It shows how, rather than engaging with scientific practice in a substantial way, Rorty relied heavily on the ideas of Thomas Kuhn. The article surveys the development of science studies since Kuhn's day, sketching an intellectual genealogy for Bruno Latour and Isabelle Stengers, whose work addresses—much more directly than Rorty's—current concerns with the (...)
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  49.  8
    The Trojan Women: A Comic.Rachel Hadas - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):121-122.
    What is right with this “comic” of Euripides's timeless and irreplaceable drama, The Trojan Women, is what was always right about a play that is relentlessly relevant. Carson's translation, spare and clear, distills the language of the original but keeps what is important, including some mouth-puckeringly wry lines. There is barbed wit and heartbreaking lullaby, sometimes coinciding on one page. Thus, the chorus comments, “Troy, you made a bad deal: / ten thousand men for a single coracle of cunt appeal.” (...)
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  50.  28
    The Murder of Professor Schlick: The Rise and Fall of the Vienna Circle.Allan Janik - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):103-104.
    It is not unusual to speculate on the contrary-to-fact implications of political assassinations. Lincoln's is the classic case in point, but we need only think of Julius Caesar, Gandhi, or John Kennedy, if we require further examples. One totally neglected case in this context is that of Moritz Schlick. One of the remote consequences of his murder, on June 22, 1936, which was most definitely a political assassination, is that today's academic world may well have been an entirely different one (...)
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  51.  25
    B Flach! B Flach!Myroslav Laiuk & Ali Kinsella - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):1-20.
    Don't tell terrible stories—everyone here has enough of their own. Everyone here has a whole bloody sack of terrible stories, and at the bottom of the sack is a hammer the narrator uses to pound you on the skull the instant you dare not believe your ears. Or to pound you when you do believe. Not long ago I saw a tomboyish girl on Khreshchatyk Street demand money of an elderly woman, threatening to bite her and infect her with syphilis. (...)
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  52.  17
    Here and There: Sites of Philosophy.Stephen Mulhall - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):105-105.
    As Cavell's draft preface makes clear, the title of this first posthumous volume of previously uncollected essays alludes to a metaphor by which he had attempted to express his conception of the nature of philosophy. “Here” and “there” are the near and far shores between which the “river of philosophy” has to take and modify its way. In earlier writing, he presented the near shore as marking one mode of philosophy's aspiration to perspicuity—that of logical or grammatical rigor. The farther (...)
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  53.  15
    Ninety-Nine Variations on a Proof.Reviel Netz - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):133-134.
    Reviews in Common Knowledge generally seek to be more cool and edgy than their subjects, an impossibility in this case. Ording takes a mathematical statement and reaches it in ninety-nine different ways. This book is quite literally a page-turner: most of the arguments take the recto page, with comments on their verso. One keeps cycling back and forth between the mathematical inventiveness of the recto and the philosophical elegance of the verso. The ambition is huge—to construct a mathematical counterpart to (...)
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  54.  12
    The Philosopher Responds: An Intellectual Correspondence from the Tenth Century.Sari Nusseibeh - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):102-103.
    This first-time and excellent English-Arabic production of an eleventh-century work by the moral philosopher Miskawayh consists of “Conclusive Answers to Disparate Questions” put to him by Tawhidi, a literary intellectual. The book should not be viewed simply as a window for the modern English reader on what occupied the minds of thinkers in that milieu and of that period. As Vasalou notes in the introduction, the work does not quite fit into the Arabic genre of the Aristotelian Problemata literature, where (...)
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  55.  11
    Reintroduction: “The Rorty Shrug”.Jeffrey M. Perl - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):21-24.
    In this brief introduction to part 2 of the Common Knowledge symposium “Whatever Happened to Richard Rorty?” the journal’s editor asks why Rorty was dependent on Thomas Kuhn, rather than Paul Feyerabend or the then-rising stars of “science studies” (such as Bruno Latour), for science-centered arguments to support his own philosophical neopragmatism. The editor cites a letter from Rorty sent to him in the early 1990s, suggesting that the differences between Feyerabend and himself were temperamental more than philosophical. Rorty enjoyed (...)
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  56.  10
    The Absent Image: Lacunae in Medieval Books.Linda Safran - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):112-113.
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  57.  11
    The Rich and the Pure: Philanthropy and the Making of Christian Society in Early Byzantium.Paul Stephenson - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):124-125.
    “Give to everyone who begs from you,” Jesus advised his followers. Most of us do not and rush on by, concerned for our safety, for what the beggar will buy with our gift of alms, for who will benefit from our gift. Fewer stop and give something: if not cash, then a snack or beverage, and their precious time. A century since Marcel Mauss published his famous essay, we all feel quite well informed about “the gift.” In this richly detailed (...)
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  58.  5
    Lives in Book History: Changing Contours of Research over Forty Years.G. Thomas Tanselle - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):127-128.
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  59.  7
    Duchamp Is My Lawyer: The Polemics, Pragmatics, and Poetics of UbuWeb.Roi Tartakovsky - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):117-118.
    A few years ago, I found myself sitting next to a renowned Language poet at a poetry reading in a crowded downtown Manhattan venue. A longtime fan, I introduced myself and shared with him that I had just taught some of his infamously challenging poems in a poetry class at Tel Aviv University and that students were very responsive. When I mentioned that it was hard to get hold of some of his books but that we had found the poems (...)
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  60.  11
    Humanizing Philosophy.Emil Višňovský - 2023 - Common Knowledge 29 (1):72-85.
    In this contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium on Richard Rorty, the author attempts to identify what he calls “the heart of Rortyism.” Beginning with Rorty's query, as an undergraduate, about “what, if anything, philosophy is good for,” Višňovský associates this question, as Rorty did throughout his career, with the question of the meaning of human life. On the basis of this association—the association of a seriously, consistently pursued metaphilosophy with a defense of humanity against all comers, including theology and (...)
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