HEC Forum

ISSN: 0956-2737

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  1.  26
    Ethical Issues in Sperm, Egg and Embryo Donation: Islamic Shia Perspectives.Md Shaikh Farid - 2024 - HEC Forum 36 (2):167-185.
    Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ARTs) have been practiced in Islamic societies within married couples since their introduction. However, there are divergent views over the issue of third-party donation among Sunni and Shia scholars. This paper illustrates the different perspectives of Shia Muslims surrounding, sperm, egg, and embryo donation and ethical aspects thereof. The study reveals that there are different views regarding sperm, egg, and embryo donation among the Shia religious leaders around the world. Many Shia religious scholars, including the Iranian supreme (...)
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  2.  10
    Aging, Equality and the Human Healthspan.Colin Farrelly - 2024 - HEC Forum 36 (2):187-205.
    John Davis (_New Methuselahs_: _The Ethics of Life_ _Extension_, The MIT Press, Cambridge, 2018) advances a novel ethical analysis of longevity science that employs a three-fold methodology of examining the impact of life extension technologies on three distinct groups: the “Haves”, the “Have-nots” and the “Will-nots”. In this essay, I critically examine the egalitarian analysis Davis deploys with respect to its ability to help us theorize about the moral significance of an applied gerontological intervention. Rather than focusing on futuristic scenarios (...)
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  3.  16
    Clinical Ethics Consultations and the Necessity of NOT Meeting Expectations: I Never Promised You a Rose Garden.Stuart G. Finder & Virginia L. Bartlett - 2024 - HEC Forum 36 (2):147-165.
    Clinical ethics consultants (CECs) work in complex environments ripe with multiple types of expectations. Significantly, some are due to the perspectives of professional colleagues and the patients and families with whom CECs consult and concern how CECs can, do, or should function, thus adding to the moral complexity faced by CECs in those particular circumstances. We outline six such common expectations: Ethics Police, Ethics Equalizer, Ethics Superhero, Ethics Expediter, Ethics Healer or Ameliorator, and, finally, Ethics Expert. Framed by examples of (...)
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  4.  24
    Civility in Health Care: A Moral Imperative.Joel M. Geiderman, John C. Moskop, Catherine A. Marco, Raquel M. Schears & Arthur R. Derse - 2024 - HEC Forum 36 (2):245-257.
    Civility is an essential feature of health care, as it is in so many other areas of human interaction. The article examines the meaning of civility, reviews its origins, and provides reasons for its moral significance in health care. It describes common types of uncivil behavior by health care professionals, patients, and visitors in hospitals and other health care settings, and it suggests strategies to prevent and respond to uncivil behavior, including institutional codes of conduct and disciplinary procedures. The article (...)
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  5.  18
    Islamic Jurisprudence on Harm Versus Harm Scenarios in Medical Confidentiality.Sayyed Mohamed Muhsin - 2024 - HEC Forum 36 (2):291-316.
    Although medical confidentiality is widely recognized as an essential principle in the therapeutic relationship, its systematic and coherent practice has been an ethically challenging duty upon healthcare providers due to various concerns of clinical, moral, religious, social, ethical and legal natures. Medical confidentiality can be breached to protect the patient and/or others if maintaining confidentiality causes serious harm. Healthcare professionals may encounter complicated situations whereby the divulgence of a patient’s confidential information may pose a threat to one party whereas the (...)
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  6.  15
    Democratizing Conscientious Refusal in Healthcare.David C. Scott - 2024 - HEC Forum 36 (2):259-289.
    Settling the debate over conscientious refusal (CR) in liberal democracies requires us to develop a conception of the healthcare provider’s moral role. Because CR claims and resulting policy changes take place in specific sociopolitical contexts with unique histories and diverse polities, the _method_ we use for deriving the healthcare norms should itself be a democratic, context-dependent inquiry. To this end, I begin by describing some prerequisites—which I call _publicity conditions_—for any democratic account of healthcare norms that conflict or jibe with (...)
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  7.  17
    Living Organ Donation for Transplantation in Bangladesh: Reality and Problems.Md Sanwar Siraj - 2024 - HEC Forum 36 (2):207-243.
    The stipulation of living organ transplantation policy and practice in Bangladesh is family-oriented, with relatives being the only people legally eligible to donate organs. There have been very few transplantations of bone marrows, liver lobes, and kidneys from related-living donors in Bangladesh. The major question addressed in this study is why Bangladesh is not getting adequate organs for transplantation. In this study, I examin the stipulations of the policy and practice of living organ donation through the lens of 32 key (...)
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  8.  11
    Clinical Ethics Consultation in Chronic Illness: Challenging Epistemic Injustice Through Epistemic Modesty.Tatjana Weidmann-Hügle & Settimio Monteverde - 2024 - HEC Forum 36 (2):131-145.
    Leading paradigms of clinical ethics consultation closely follow a biomedical model of care. In this paper, we present a theoretical reflection on the underlying biomedical model of disease, how it shaped clinical practices and patterns of ethical deliberation within these practices, and the repercussions it has on clinical ethics consultations for patients with chronic illness. We contend that this model, despite its important contribution to capturing the ethical issues of day-to-day clinical ethics deliberation, might not be sufficient for patients presenting (...)
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  9.  20
    Building Effective Mentoring Relationships During Clinical Ethics Fellowships: Pedagogy, Programs, and People.Trevor M. Bibler, Ryan H. Nelson, Bryanna Moore, Janet Malek & Mary A. Majumder - 2024 - HEC Forum 36 (1):1-29.
    How should clinical ethicists be trained? Scholars have stated that clinical ethics fellowships create well-trained, competent ethicists. While this appears intuitive, few features of fellowship programs have been publicly discussed, let alone debated. In this paper, we examine how fellowships can foster effective mentoring relationships. These relationships provide the foundation for the fellow’s transition from novice to competent professional. In this essay, we begin by discussing our pedagogical commitments. Next, we describe the structures our program has created to assist our (...)
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  10.  19
    The Need for Specialized Oncology Training for Clinical Ethicists.Eric C. Blackstone & Barbara J. Daly - 2024 - HEC Forum 36 (1):45-59.
    Numerous ethical issues are raised in cancer treatment and research. Informed consent is challenging due to complex treatment modalities and prognostic uncertainty. Busy oncology clinics limit the ability of oncologists to spend time reinforcing patient understanding and facilitating end-of-life planning. Despite these issues and the ethics consultations they generate, clinical ethicists receive little if any focused education about cancer and its treatment. As the field of clinical ethics develops standards for training, we argue that a basic knowledge of cancer should (...)
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  11.  19
    Suppressing Scientific Discourse on Vaccines? Self-perceptions of researchers and practitioners.Ety Elisha, Josh Guetzkow, Yaffa Shir-Raz & Natti Ronel - 2024 - HEC Forum 36 (1):71-89.
    The controversy over vaccines has recently intensified in the wake of the global COVID-19 pandemic, with calls from politicians, health professionals, journalists, and citizens to take harsh measures against so-called “anti-vaxxers,” while accusing them of spreading “fake news” and as such, of endangering public health. However, the issue of suppression of vaccine dissenters has rarely been studied from the point of view of those who raise concerns about vaccine safety. The purpose of the present study was to examine the subjective (...)
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  12.  36
    The “Ladder of Inference” as a Conflict Management Tool: Working with the “Difficult” Patient or Family in Healthcare Ethics Consultations.Autumn Fiester - 2024 - HEC Forum 36 (1):31-44.
    Conflict resolution is a core component of healthcare ethics consultation (HEC) and proficiency in this skill set is recognized by the national bioethics organization and its HEC certification process. Difficult interpersonal interactions between the clinical team and patients or their families are often inexorably connected to the normative disputes that are the catalyst for the consult. Ethics consultants are often required to navigate challenging dynamics that have become entrenched and work with patient-provider or family-provider relationships that have already broken down. (...)
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  13.  11
    Responding to Cultural Limitations on Patient Autonomy: A Clinical Ethics Case Study.Sara Kolmes, Christine Ha & Jordan Potter - 2024 - HEC Forum 36 (1):99-109.
    This paper is a clinical ethics case study which sheds light on several important dilemmas which arise in providing care to patients from cultures with non-individualistic conceptions of autonomy. Medical professionals face a difficult challenge in determining how to respond when families of patients ask that patients not be informed of bad medical news. These requests are often made for cultural reasons, by families seeking to protect patients. In these cases, the right that patients have to their own medical information (...)
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  14.  17
    Cost: An Important Question That Must Be Asked.R. Andrew Morgan - 2024 - HEC Forum 36 (1):61-70.
    Cost conversations are essential to informed consent because patients have a right to information that they think is relevant, and patients overwhelmingly report that cost information is relevant to their medical decisions. Providers have an ethical responsibility to provide necessary information for informed consent, and therefore must discuss costs. The Shared Decision Making model is ideal for enabling this exchange of information, and decision aids are also helpful. Although barriers exist, many useful tools can help providers fulfill this obligation, and (...)
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  15. Tough Clinical Decisions: Experiences of Polish Physicians.Joanna Różyńska, Jakub Zawiła-Niedźwiecki, Bartosz Maćkiewicz & Marek Czarkowski - 2024 - HEC Forum 36 (1):111-130.
    The paper reports results of the very first survey-based study on the prevalence, frequency and nature of ethical or other non-medical difficulties faced by Polish physicians in their everyday clinical practice. The study involved 521 physicians of various medical specialties, practicing mainly in inpatient healthcare. The study showed that the majority of Polish physicians encounter ethical and other non-medical difficulties in making clinical decisions. However, they confront such difficulties less frequently than their foreign peers. Moreover, Polish doctors indicate different circumstances (...)
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  16.  8
    Platelets, Puppies, and Payment: How Surveys can be Misleading in the Remuneration Debate.James Stacey Taylor - 2024 - HEC Forum 36 (1):91-98.
    In a recent article (“The current state of the platelet supply in the US and proposed options to decrease the risk of critical shortages”) published in _Transfusion,_ Stubbs et al. have argued that platelet donors should be paid. Dodd et al. have argued against this proposal, supporting their response with survey data that shows that blood donors (and by extension platelet donors) and potential platelet donors are uninterested in receiving incentives to encourage them to donate. Instead, argue Dodd et al., (...)
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