13 found

Year:

  1.  7
    Academic During a Pandemic: Reflections From a Medical Student on Learning During SARS-CoVid-2.Vivian Anderson - 2021 - HEC Forum 33 (1-2):35-43.
    The current pandemic represents unprecedented times in medical education. In addition to the already strenuous demands of medical school, the SARS-CoVid-2 pandemic introduced a new source of ethical and moral pressure on students. Medical students navigated finishing their didactic years in isolation and initiated their clinical rotations in a pandemic environment. Many medical students found themselves in the frustrating position of being non-essential healthcare workers but still wanting to help. This paper follows the personal and shared experiences of a second-year (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  7
    A Tale of Two Crises: Addressing Covid-19 Vaccine Hesitancy as Promoting Racial Justice.Lauren Bunch - 2021 - HEC Forum 33 (1-2):143-154.
    The year 2020 has yielded twin crises in the United States: a global pandemic and a public reckoning with racism brought about by a series of publicized instances of police violence toward Black men and women. Current data indicate that nationally, Black Americans are three times more likely than White Americans to contract Covid-19, a pattern that underscores the more general phenomenon of health disparity among Black and White Americans. Once exposed, Black Americans are twice as likely to die of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  6
    Correction To: A Tale of Two Crises: Addressing Covid‑19 Vaccine Hesitancy as Promoting Racial Justice.Lauren Bunch - 2021 - HEC Forum 33 (1-2):155-155.
    In the original publication, the sentence “Most notable and famous are the Tuskegee syphilis experiments that occurred from 1932–1972, in which Black men in Macon County, AL were infected with syphilis under the guise of free health care.” under the section “Drivers of Mistrust of Motives” was published incorrectly. The correct one is “Most notable and famous are the Tuskegee syphilis experiments that occurred from 1932–1972, in which Black men in Macon County, AL many of whom had latent syphilis, were (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  1
    A Journal of the COVID-19 (Plague) Year.Brian H. Childs & Laura Vearrier - 2021 - HEC Forum 33 (1-2):1-6.
    The essays in this special issue of HEC Forum provide reflections that make explicit the implicit anthropology that our current pandemic has brought but which in the medical ethics literature around COVID-19 has to a great extent ignored. Three of the essays are clearly “journalistic” as a literary genre: one by a hospital chaplain, one by a medical student in her pre-clinical years, and one by a fourth-year medical student who reports her experience as she completed her undergraduate clerkships and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  7
    Getting Real: The Maryland Healthcare Ethics Committee Network’s COVID-19 Working Group Debriefs Lessons Learned.Norton Elson, Howard Gwon, Diane E. Hoffmann, Adam M. Kelmenson, Ahmed Khan, Joanne F. Kraus, Casmir C. Onyegwara, Gail Povar, Fatima Sheikh & Anita J. Tarzian - 2021 - HEC Forum 33 (1):91-107.
    Responding to a major pandemic and planning for allocation of scarce resources under crisis standards of care requires coordination and cooperation across federal, state and local governments in tandem with the larger societal infrastructure. Maryland remains one of the few states with no state-endorsed ASR plan, despite having a plan published in 2017 that was informed by public forums across the state. In this article, we review strengths and weaknesses of Maryland’s response to COVID-19 and the role of the Maryland (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  4
    Oral Health Matters: The Ethics of Providing Oral Health During COVID-19.Nanette Elster & Kayhan Parsi - 2021 - HEC Forum 33 (1):157-164.
    Oral health is a critical part of overall health. The current COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of oral health. In this article, we describe how dental practice has been impacted by COVID-19, identify the public health response to COVID-19, and explain the gradual resumption of dental care after the initial disruption due to the pandemic. Finally, we discuss how long-standing health disparities in oral health have been exacerbated by the current pandemic.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  4
    Covid-19 in Historical Context: Creating a Practical Past.Amy W. Forbes - 2021 - HEC Forum 33 (1-2):7-18.
    Decades ago, in his foundational essay on the early days of the AIDS crisis, medical historian Charles Rosenberg wrote, “epidemics start at a moment in time, proceed on a stage limited in space and duration, following a plot line of increasing revelatory tension, move to a crisis of individual and collective character, then drift toward closure.” In the course of epidemics, societies grappled with sudden and unexpected mortality and also returned to fundamental questions about core social values. “Epidemics,” Rosenberg wrote, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  8
    The Cost of Safety During a Pandemic.Rachel M. B. Greiner - 2021 - HEC Forum 33 (1-2):61-72.
    A first-person account of some victims of the virus, the author puts faces and circumstances to the tragedy of the Covid-19 pandemic. Told from a chaplain’s point of view, these narratives will take the reader beyond the numbers and ask questions like: What is the cost of keeping families separated at the end of life, and, if patient/family centered care is so central to healthcare these days, why was it immediately discarded? Is potentially saving human lives worth the risk of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9.  6
    Viral Heroism: What the Rhetoric of Heroes in the COVID-19 Pandemic Tells Us About Medicine and Professional Identity.Patrick D. Hopkins - 2021 - HEC Forum 33 (1):109-124.
    Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic the use of the term “hero” has been widespread. This is especially common in the context of healthcare workers and it is now unremarkable to see large banners on hospital exteriors that say “heroes work here”. There is more to be gleaned from the rhetoric of heroism than just awareness of public appreciation, however. Calling physicians and nurses heroes for treating sick people indicates something about the concept of medicine and medical professionals. In this essay, I (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  7
    Guidance for Medical Ethicists to Enhance Social Cooperation to Mitigate the Pandemic.Kevin Powell & Christopher Meyers - 2021 - HEC Forum 33 (1):73-90.
    The Covid-19 pandemic has presented major challenges to society, exposing preexisting ethical weaknesses in the modern social fabric’s ability to respond. Distrust in government and a lessened authority of science to determine facts have both been exacerbated by the polarization and disinformation enhanced by social media. These have impaired society’s willingness to comply with and persevere with social distancing, which has been the most powerful initial response to mitigate the pandemic. These preexisting weaknesses also threaten the future acceptance of vaccination (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11.  2
    Acknowledging the Burdens of ‘Blackness’.Nneka O. Sederstrom & Jada Wiggleton-Little - 2021 - HEC Forum 33 (1-2):19-33.
    The novel coronavirus of 2019 exposed, in an undeniable way, the severity of racial inequities in America’s healthcare system. As the urgency of the pandemic grew, administrators, clinicians, and ethicists became concerned with upholding the ethical principle of “most lives saved” by re-visiting crisis standards of care and triage protocols. Yet a colorblind, race-neutral approach to “most lives saved” is inherently inequitable because it reflects the normality and invisibility of ‘whiteness’ while simultaneously disregarding the burdens of ‘Blackness’. As written, the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  6
    COVID 19: A Cause for Pause in Undergraduate Medical Education and Catalyst for Innovation.Elizabeth Southworth & Sara H. Gleason - 2021 - HEC Forum 33 (1-2):125-142.
    As the world held its breath for news surrounding COVID-19 and hunkered down amidst stay-at-home orders, medical students across the U.S. wondered if they would be called to serve on the front lines of the pandemic. Medical school administrators faced the challenge of protecting learners while also minimizing harm to their medical education. This balancing act raised critical questions in medical education as institutions reacted to changing guidelines. COVID-19 has punctuated already contentious areas of medical education and has forced institutions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  8
    Utilitarian Principlism as a Framework for Crisis Healthcare Ethics.Laura Vearrier & Carrie M. Henderson - 2021 - HEC Forum 33 (1):45-60.
    This paper introduces the model of Utilitarian Principlism as a framework for crisis healthcare ethics. In modern Western medicine, during non-crisis times, principlism provides the four guiding principles in biomedical ethics—autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, and justice; autonomy typically emerges as the decisive principle. The physician–patient relationship is a deontological construct in which the physician’s primary duty is to the individual patient and the individual patient is paramount. For this reason, we term the non-crisis ethical framework that guides modern medicine Deontological Principlism. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues