6 found

Year:

  1.  9
    On the Force-Feeding of Prisoners on Hunger Strike.Kathrine Bendtsen - 2019 - HEC Forum 31 (1):29-48.
    Roughly 80,000 U.S. prisoners are held in solitary confinement at any given time. A significant body of research shows that solitary confinement has severe, long-term effects, and the United Nations has condemned the practice of solitary confinement as torture. For years, prisoners have been organizing hunger strikes in order to protest solitary confinement. But such action is not without consequences, and some inmates have suffered serious injury or death. The question I raise in this paper is whether we ought to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  3
    An Ethical Framework for the Care of Patients with Prolonged Hospitalization Following Lung Transplantation.Andrew M. Courtwright, Emily Rubin, Ellen M. Robinson, Souheil El-Chemaly, Daniela Lamas, Joshua M. Diamond & Hilary J. Goldberg - 2019 - HEC Forum 31 (1):49-62.
    The lung allocation score system in the United States and several European countries gives more weight to risk of death without transplantation than to survival following transplantation. As a result, centers transplant sicker patients, leading to increased length of initial hospitalization. The care of patients who have accumulated functional deficits or additional organ dysfunction during their prolonged stay can be ethically complex. Disagreement occurs between the transplant team, patients and families, and non-transplant health care professionals over the burdens of ongoing (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  8
    Death, Devices, and Double Effect.Stuart G. Finder & Michael Nurok - 2019 - HEC Forum 31 (1):63-73.
    Along with the growing utilization of the total artificial heart comes a new set of ethical issues that have, surprisingly, received little attention in the literature: How does one apply the criteria of irreversible cessation of circulatory function given that a TAH rarely stops functioning on its own? Can one appeal to the doctrine of double effect as an ethical rationale for turning off a TAH given that this action directly results in death? And, On what ethical grounds can a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  11
    Problematic Ethics: Public Opinion Surveys in Medico-Legal Disputes.Tom Koch - 2019 - HEC Forum 31 (1):1-10.
    Public opinion surveys and polls have a long history as tools for the reportage of public sentiment. Born in the “straw polls” of nineteenth century politics, their use expanded in the last century to include a range of commercial and social subjects. In recent decades, these have included issues of medico-legal uncertainty including, in a partial list, abortion, fetal tissue research, and the propriety of medical termination. Because public opinion surveys are assumed to be “scientific,” and thus unbiased, there has (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  15
    Ethical Issues Arising From Marijuana Use by Nursing Mothers in a Changing Legal and Cultural Context.Jessica Miller - 2019 - HEC Forum 31 (1):11-27.
    In the early 2000s, several states legalized marijuana for medicinal uses. Since then, more and more states have either decriminalized or legalized marijuana use for medical or recreational purposes. Federal law has remained unchanged. The state-level decriminalization of marijuana and the concomitant de-stigmatizing and mainstreaming is likely to lead to greater use among the general population, including among nursing mothers. Marijuana is already one of the most widely used illicit substances among lactating women. There exist few studies demonstrating the effects (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  4
    The Team Based Biopsychosocial Model: Having a Clinical Ethicist as a Facilitator and a Bridge Between Teams.Claudia R. Sotomayor & Colleen M. Gallagher - 2019 - HEC Forum 31 (1):75-83.
    The biopsychosocial model is characterized by the systematic consideration of biological, psychological, and social factors and their complex interactions in understanding health, illness, and health care delivery. This model opposes the biomedical model, which is the foundation of most current clinical practice. In the biomedical model, quest for evidence based medicine, the patient is reduced to molecules, genes, organelles, systems, diseases, etc. This reduction has brought great advances in medicine, but it lacks a holistic view of the person. To solve (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues