History of the Human Sciences

ISSNs: 0952-6951, 1461-720X

6 found

View year:

  1.  8
    The pincer movement of The Idea of a Social Science: Winch, Collingwood, and philosophy as a human science.Jonas Ahlskog & Olli Lagerspetz - 2024 - History of the Human Sciences 37 (1):28-46.
    This article argues that, in order to understand Peter Winch's view of philosophy, it is profitable to read him together with R. G. Collingwood's philosophy of history. Collingwood was both an important source for Winch and a thinker engaged in a closely parallel philosophical pursuit. Collingwood and Winch shared the view that philosophy is an effort to understand the various ways in which human beings make reality intelligible. For both, this called for rapprochement between philosophy and the humanities. Like Collingwood, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  11
    Vico and the conspiracy of the sciences.Víctor Alonso-Rocafort - 2024 - History of the Human Sciences 37 (1):121-145.
    On 18 October 1708, Giambattista Vico (1668–1744) gave his seventh inaugural oration, De nostri temporis studiorum ratione (De ratione) at the University of Naples. There, he used the term conspirare to propose collaboration among the sciences. An initial study of the historical context, specifically the scholar’s involvement with the Conspiracy of the Prince of Macchia (1701) and the debates on university reform, makes it possible to formulate a hypothesis regarding Vico’s intent and word choice that enriches our understanding of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  5
    Managing power and psychiatric training in the United States, 1945–1990.Laura Hirshbein - 2024 - History of the Human Sciences 37 (1):72-98.
    In the wake of their heightened role in addressing the emotional challenges of United States soldiers during World War II, American psychiatrists increasingly argued that their knowledge of human nature, based on interpretation of unconscious processes, was a powerful tool in effecting changes in society. As they turned to training an adequate supply of psychiatrists to meet expanding demand, educators in psychiatry residency programs faced questions about whom to entrust with the power of psychiatric interpretation, how educators’ knowledge about trainees’ (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  11
    The moral economy of diversity: How the epistemic value of diversity transforms late modern knowledge cultures.Nicolas Langlitz & Clemente de Althaus - 2024 - History of the Human Sciences 37 (1):3-27.
    We may well be witnessing a decisive event in the history of knowledge as diversity is becoming one of the premier values of late modern societies. We seek to preserve and foster biodiversity, neurodiversity, racial diversity, ethnic diversity, gender diversity, linguistic diversity, cultural diversity, and perspectival diversity. Perspectival diversity has become the passage point through which other forms of diversity must pass to become epistemically consequential. This article examines how two of its varieties, viewpoint diversity and educational diversity, have come (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  9
    Corrado Gini's economic anthropology.Roberto Romani - 2024 - History of the Human Sciences 37 (1):99-120.
    Corrado Gini was a key intellectual in the Fascist establishment. His scientific programme included statistics, demography, eugenics, economics, and sociology, as well as occasional forays into political thought and anthropology. Historians have focused on his statistics and eugenics, in connection with his spell as head of the Italian bureau of statistics. This article, integrating economics with the other threads of Gini’s programme, takes economic anthropology as a standpoint to reassess the inspiration behind his whole oeuvre. That anthropology consisted of two (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  8
    The crisis of modern society: Richard Titmuss and Emile Durkheim.John Stewart - 2024 - History of the Human Sciences 37 (1):47-71.
    This article examines the influence of Emile Durkheim's sociology on Richard Titmuss, founder of the academic field of social policy. While operating in different environments and historical eras, they shared concerns about modernity's impact on contemporary societies, heightened by their experiences of living in periods of considerable political and socio-economic upheaval. Their social thought embraced crucial complementarities, and understanding these adds a previously under-explored dimension to Titmuss's influential analyses of Britain's post-war ‘welfare state’.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues