History of the Human Sciences

ISSNs: 0952-6951, 1461-720X

47 found

View year:

  1.  2
    The Hoffman Report in Historical Context: A Study in Denial.Dan Aalbers - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (5):27-50.
    Using the concept of social denial, this article puts the American Psychological Association's pattern of willful blindness, identified by independent reviewer David Hoffman, in historical context by examining the contributions of Cold War social scientists to the CIA's KUBARK torture manual, and discusses the implications of this history for the reform of the APA's ethics policies. David Hoffman found that the leadership of the APA colluded with Department of Defense to ensure that the APA's ethical policies were no stronger than (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  2
    A Military/Intelligence Operational Perspective on the American Psychological Association’s Weaponization of Psychology Post-9/11.Jean Maria Arrigo, Lawrence P. Rockwood, Jack O’Brien, Dutch Franz, David DeBatto & John Kiriakou - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (5):51-79.
    We examine the role of the American Psychological Association in the weaponization of American psychology post-9/11. In 2004, psychologists’ involvement in the detention and interrogation of terrorist suspects generated controversy over psychological ethics in national security. Two signal events inflamed the controversy. The 2005 APA PENS Report legitimized clinical psychology consultation in support of military/intelligence operations with detained terrorist suspects. An independent review, the 2015 Hoffman Report, found APA collusion with the US Department of Defense in producing the APA PENS (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  4
    Confronting the Field: Tylor's Anahuac and Victorian Thought on Human Diversity.Chiara Lacroix - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (5):135-156.
    Victorian anthropologists have been nicknamed ‘armchair anthropologists’. Yet some of them did set foot in the field. Edward Burnett Tylor's first published work, Anahuac, or Mexico and the Mexicans, Ancient and Modern, described his youthful travels in Mexico. Tylor's confrontation with the ‘field’ revealed significant tensions between the different beliefs and attitudes that Tylor held towards Mexican society. Contrasts between the evidence of Mexico's history and the present-day society of the 1850s led Tylor to see both progress and degeneration in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  2
    Mind and Knowledge in the Early Thought of Franz Boas, 1887–1904.Valentina Mann - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (5):157-184.
    Franz Boas’ articulation of a new historicist and relativistic framework for anthropology stands as the founding moment of the discipline. Accordingly, scholars have sought to trace its source and inspirations, often concluding that Boas’ thought was shaped almost exclusively by his German background and characterized by a foundational methodological tension. Here, I instead show that Boas’ most creative early work benefitted from close interaction with debates in psychology and that his methodological reflections were part of the much wider series of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  6
    Stressing the ‘Body Electric’: History and Psychology of the Techno-Ecologies of Work Stress.Jessica Pykett & Mark Paterson - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (5):185-212.
    This article explores histories of the science of stress and its measurement from the mid 19th century, and brings these into dialogue with critical sociological analysis of emerging responses to work stress in policy and practice. In particular, it shows how the contemporary development of biomedical and consumer devices for stress self-monitoring is based on selectively rediscovering the biological determinants and biomarkers of stress, human functioning in terms of evolutionary ecology, and the physical health impacts of stress. It considers how (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  13
    Quentin Skinner, Contextual Method and Machiavelli's Understanding of Liberty.Nikola Regent - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (5):108-134.
    The article examines Quentin Skinner's influential interpretation of Machiavelli's views on liberty, and the sharp divergence between his methodological ideas and his actual practice. The paper explores how Skinner's political ideals directed his interpretation against his own methodological precepts, to offer a basis for a ‘revival’ of republican theory. Skinner's reinterpretation of Machiavelli as a theorist of negative liberty is examined, and refuted. The article analyses Skinner's claim about liberty as the key political value for Machiavelli, and demonstrates that liberty (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Beyond Following Rules: Teaching Research Ethics in the Age of the Hoffman Report.Elissa N. Rodkey, Michael Buttrey & Krista L. Rodkey - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (5):80-107.
    The Hoffman Report scandal demonstrates that ethics is not objective and ahistorical, contradicting the comforting progressive story about ethics many students receive. This modern-day ethical failure illustrates some of the weaknesses of the current ethics code: it is rule-based, emphasizes punishments for noncompliance, and assumes a rational actor who can make tricky ethical decisions using a cost–benefit analysis. This rational emphasis translates into pedagogy: the cure for unethical behavior is more education. Yet such an approach seems unlikely to foster ethical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Beyond Torture: Knowledge and Power at the Nexus of Social Science and National Security.Joy Rohde - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (5):7-26.
    In the wake of revelations about the American Psychological Association's complicity in the military's enhanced interrogation program, some psychologists have called upon the association to sever its ties to national security agencies. But psychology's relationship to the military is no short-term fling born of the War on Terror. This article demonstrates that psychology's close relationship to national security agencies and interests has long been a visible and consequential feature of the discipline. Drawing on social scientific debates about the relationship between (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  1
    Introduction: The Hoffman Report in Historical Context.Nadine Weidman - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (5):3-6.
    This brief introduction explains the historical background of the Hoffman Report, the 2015 independent counsel's investigation into the American Psychological Association's role in aiding ‘enhanced interrogations’ of detainees in the Bush Administration's Global War on Terror. It also outlines the articles in this special section of History of the Human Sciences on the Hoffman Report in Historical Context.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  29
    The Ultimate Think Tank: The Rise of the Santa Fe Institute Libertarian.Erik Baker - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (3-4):32-57.
    Why do corporations and wealthy philanthropists fund the human sciences? Examining the history of the Santa Fe Institute, a private research institute founded in the early 1980s, this article shows that funders can find as much value in the social worlds of the sciences they sponsor as in their ideas. SFI became increasingly dependent on funding from corporations and libertarian business leaders in the 1990s and 2000s. At the same time, its intellectual work came to focus on the underlying principles (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11.  6
    Psychoanalysis and Anti-Racism in Mid-20th-Century America: An Alternative Angle of Vision.Tom Fielder - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (3-4):193-217.
    The conventional historiography of psychoanalysis in America offers few opportunities for the elaboration of anti-racist themes, and instead American ‘ego psychology’ has often been regarded as the most acute exemplar of ‘racist’ psychoanalysis. In this article, consistent with the historiographical turn Burnham first identified under the heading of ‘the New Freud Studies’, I distinguish between histories of psychoanalytic practitioners and histories of psychoanalytic ideas in order to open out an alternative angle of vision on the historiography. For psychoanalytic ideas were (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  9
    The Conundrum of the Psychological Interface: On the Problems of Bridging the Biological and the Social.James Rupert Fletcher & Rasmus H. Birk - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (3-4):317-339.
    In this article, we consider how certain types of contemporary biosocial psychiatric research conceptualise and explicate biology-social relations. We compare the historic biopsychosocial model to recent examples of social defeat research on schizophrenia and cultural neuroscience work on affective disorders. This comparison reveals how the contemporary turn towards the ‘biosocial’ within psychiatric research relies upon ideas of the psychological as an interface. This is problematic because psychological notions of ‘experience’ are used as the central mechanics of biosocial processes, but lack (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  4
    The Pragmatic Use of Metaphor in Empirical Psychology.Rami Gabriel - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (3-4):291-316.
    Metaphors of mind and their elaboration into models serve a crucial explanatory role in psychology. In this article, an attempt is made to describe how biology and engineering provide the predominant metaphors for contemporary psychology. A contrast between the discursive and descriptive functions of metaphor use in theory construction serves as a platform for deliberation upon the pragmatic consequences of models derived therefrom. The conclusion contains reflections upon the possibility of an integrative interdisciplinary psychology.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  23
    Fairbairn, Winnicott, and Guntrip on the Social Significance of Schizoids.Gal Gerson - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (3-4):144-167.
    The mid-century object relations approach saw the category of schizoids as crucial to its own formation. Rooted in a developmental phase where the perception of the mother as a whole and real person had not yet been secured, the schizoid constitution impeded relationships and forced schizoids to communicate through a compliant persona while the kernel self remained isolated. Fairbairn, Winnicott, and Guntrip thought that schizoid features underlay many other pathologies that earlier, Freudian psychoanalysis had misidentified. To correct this, a move (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  5
    Documenting Insanity: Paperwork and Patient Narratives in Psychiatric History.Liana Glew - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (3-4):3-31.
    Paperwork plays a key role in a how institutions accommodate, refuse, or manage disabled people. This article develops modes for reading paperwork that build on each other, beginning with recognizing the institutional pressures at work in shaping bureaucratic practices, then considering how a person's relationship to disability influences how they might encounter these practices, and ultimately noticing how the encounter between disabled/mad people and an institution might create something new, what the author calls archival excess. These methods for reading are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  13
    On Some Antecedents of Behavioural Economics.Kristian Bondo Hansen & Thomas Presskorn-Thygesen - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (3-4):58-83.
    Since its inception in the late 1970s, behavioural economics has gone from being an outlier to a widely recognized yet still contested subset of the economic sciences. One of the basic arguments in behavioural economics is that a more realistic psychology ought to inform economic theories. While the history of behavioural economics is often portrayed and articulated as spanning no more than a few decades, the practice of utilizing ideas from psychology to rethink theories of economics is over a century (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  3
    From the Margins to the NICE Guidelines: British Clinical Psychology and the Development of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Psychosis, 1982–2002.David J. Harper & Sebastian Townsend - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (3-4):260-290.
    Although histories of cognitive behaviour therapy have begun to appear, their use with people with psychosis diagnoses has received relatively little attention. In this article, we elucidate the conditions of possibility for the emergence of cognitive behaviour therapy for psychosis in England between 1982 and 2002. We present an analysis of policy documents, research publications and books, participant observation, and interviews with a group of leading researchers and senior policy actors. Informed by Derksen and Beaulieu’s articulation of social technologies, we (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  4
    From Class Origins to Individual Psychopathology: Spousal Murder According to State Socialist Czechoslovak Criminology.Kateřina Lišková & Lucia Moravanská - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (3-4):237-259.
    Over the course of 40 years of state socialism, the explanation that Czechoslovak criminologists gave for spousal murder changed significantly. Initially attributing offences to the perpetrator's class origins, remnants of his bourgeois way of life, and the lack of positive influence from the collective in the long 1950s, criminologists then refocused their attention solely on the individual's psychopathology during the period known as ‘Normalization’, which encompassed the last two decades of state socialism. Based on an analysis of archival sources, including (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  20
    Psychometric Origins of Depression.Susan McPherson & David Armstrong - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (3-4):127-143.
    This article examines the historical construction of depression over about a hundred years, employing the social life of methods as an explanatory framework. Specifically, it considers how emerging methodologies in the measurement of psychological constructs contributed to changes in epistemological approaches to mental illness and created the conditions of possibility for major shifts in the construction of depression. While depression was once seen as a feature of psychotic personality, measurement technologies made it possible for it to be reconstructed as changeable (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  4
    ‘You Never Need an Analyst with Bobby Around’: The Mid-20th-Century Human Sciences in Sondheim and Furth's Musical Company.Jeffrey Rubel - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (3-4):168-192.
    This article offers a case study in how historians of science can use musical theater productions to understand the cultural reception of scientific ideas. In 1970, Stephen Sondheim and George Furth's musical Company opened on Broadway. The show engaged with and reflected contemporary theories and ideas from the human sciences; Company's portrayal of its 35-year-old bachelor protagonist, his married friends, and his girlfriends reflected present-day theories from psychoanalysis, sexology, and sociology. In 2018, when director Marianne Elliott revived the show with (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  2
    Alfred Vierkandt’s Notion of the Social Group.Sandro Segre - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (3-4):113-126.
    German sociologist Alfred Vierkandt is hardly remembered today. This may seem surprising. Several prominent sociologists from the German-speaking countries contributed to the Handwörterbuch der Soziologie, which Vierkandt edited and published. However, Vierkandt did not interact with any of them significantly, and this publication brought no recognition of the importance of his sociological oeuvre in Germany, the United States, or elsewhere. His key notion of the social group found no acknowledgment among other contemporary or later sociologists, even though several of them (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  7
    Lesbian and Bisexual Women's Experiences of Aversion Therapy in England.Helen Spandler & Sarah Carr - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (3-4):218-236.
    This article presents the findings of a study about the history of aversion therapy as a treatment technique in the English mental health system to convert lesbians and bisexual women into heterosexual women. We explored published psychiatric and psychological literature, as well as lesbian, gay, and bisexual archives and anthologies. We identified 10 examples of young women receiving aversion therapy in England in the 1960s and 1970s. We situate our discussion within the context of post-war British and transnational medical history. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  13
    Measuring Non-Han Bodies: Anthropometry, Colonialism, and Biopower in China's South-Western Borderland in the 1930s and 1940s.Jing Zhu - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (3-4):84-112.
    This article examines the biopower of non-Han bodies by considering the intersections of anthropology, racial science, and colonial regimes. During the 1930s and 1940s, when extensive anthropometric research was being undertaken on non-Han populations in the south-western borderlands of China, several anthropologists studied non-Han groups under the aegis of frontier administration. Chinese scholars sought to generate the physical characteristics of ethnic minority groups in the south-west of China through the methodology of body measurement, in order to identify forms of social (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  10
    Revisiting the ‘Darwin–Marx Correspondence’: Multiple Discovery and the Rhetoric of Priority.Joel Barnes - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):29-54.
    Between the 1930s and the mid 1970s, it was commonly believed that in 1880 Karl Marx had proposed to dedicate to Charles Darwin a volume or translation of Capital but that Darwin had refused. The detail was often interpreted by scholars as having larger significance for the question of the relationship between Darwinian evolutionary biology and Marxist political economy. In 1973–4, two scholars working independently—Lewis Feuer, professor of sociology at Toronto, and Margaret Fay, a graduate student at Berkeley—determined simultaneously that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  3
    Criticism as Self-Analysis.Clive Barnett - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):219-228.
  26.  12
    Frederick Antal and the Marxist Challenge to Art History.Jim Berryman - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):55-76.
    First published in 1948, Frederick Antal’s Florentine Painting and Its Social Background was an important milestone in anglophone art history. Based on European examples, including Max Dvořák, it sought to understand art history’s relationship to social and intellectual history. When Antal, a Hungarian émigré, arrived in Britain in 1933, he encountered an inward-looking discipline preoccupied with formalism and connoisseurship; or, as he phrased it, art historians of ‘the older persuasion’ ignorant of ‘the fruitful achievements of modern historical research’. Despite its (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  3
    On the Assumption of Self-Reflective Subjectivity.Christoforos Bouzanis - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):167-193.
    Contemporary social theory has consistently emphasized habitual action, rule-following, and role-performing as key aspects of social life, yet the challenge remains of combining these aspects with the omnipresent phenomenon of self-reflective conduct. This article attempts to tackle this challenge by proposing useful distinctions that can facilitate further interdisciplinary research on self-reflection. To this end, I argue that we need a more sophisticated set of distinctions and categories in our understanding of habitual action. The analysis casts light on the idea that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  5
    Freud in Cambridge Review Symposium.Felicity Callard & Sarah Marks - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):194-197.
  29.  5
    Reply to My Commentators – Thinking with Forrester: Dreams, True Crimes, and Histories of Change.Laura Jean Cameron - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):229-238.
  30.  5
    Freud in Cambridge: An Institutional Romance? [REVIEW]Jessica Dubow - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):212-218.
  31.  18
    Rahel Jaeggi’s Theory of Alienation.Justin Evans - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):126-143.
    Rahel Jaeggi’s theory of alienation has received less attention than her work on forms of life and capitalism. This theory avoids the problems of traditional theories of alienation: objectivism, paternalism, and essentialism. It also sidesteps post-structuralist criticisms of the theory of alienation. However, Jaeggi’s theory is flawed in two ways: it is not historically specific, and so cannot explain why alienation is a problem for modernity rather than other historical periods, and it is difficult to connect to social critique. I (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  32.  5
    Social Science and Marxist Humanism Beyond Collectivism in Socialist Romania.Adela Hîncu - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):77-100.
    This article brings together the history of the social sciences and the history of social thought in Socialist Romania. It is concerned with the development of ideas about the social beyond collectivism, especially about the relationship between individual and society under socialism, from the early 1960s to the end of the 1970s. The analysis speaks to three major themes in the current historiography of Cold War social science. First, the article investigates the role of disciplinary specialization in the advancement of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  6
    Fort/Da/Freud.Paul Kingsbury - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):198-204.
  34.  11
    Cultivating Trust, Producing Knowledge: The Management of Archaeological Labour and the Making of a Discipline.Allison Mickel & Nylah Byrd - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):3-28.
    Like any science, archaeology relies on trust between actors involved in the production of knowledge. In the early history of archaeology, this epistemic trust was complicated by histories of Orientalism in the Middle East and colonialism more broadly. The racial and power dynamics underpinning 19th- and early 20th-century archaeology precluded the possibility of interpersonal moral trust between foreign archaeologists and locally hired labourers. In light of this, archaeologists created systems of reward, punishment, and surveillance to ensure the honest behaviour of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  11
    Simulating Marx: Herbert A. Simon's Cognitivist Approach to Dialectical Materialism.Enrico Petracca - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):101-125.
    Starting in the 1950s, computer programs for simulating cognitive processes and intelligent behaviour were the hallmark of Good Old-Fashioned Artificial Intelligence and ‘cognitivist’ cognitive science. This article examines a somewhat neglected case of simulation pursued by one of the founding fathers of simulation methodology, Herbert A. Simon. In the 1970s and 1980s, Simon had repeated contacts with Marxist countries and scientists, in the context of which he advanced the idea that cognitivism could be used as a framework for simulating dialectical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  6
    A Public Inquiry Into Freud’s Influence Upon Cambridge. [REVIEW]Steve Pile - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):205-211.
    Review Symposium on John Forrester and Laura Cameron’s Freud In Cambridge.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  3
    The Idea of an Ethically Committed Social Science.Leonidas Tsilipakos - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):144-166.
    This article presents a long overdue analysis of the idea of an ethically committed social science, which, after the demise of positivism and the deeming of moral neutrality as impossible, has come to dominate the self-understanding of many contemporary sociological approaches. Once adequately specified, however, the idea is shown to be ethically questionable in that it works against the moral commitments constitutive of academic life. The argument is conducted with resources from the work of Peter Winch, thus establishing its continuing (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  1
    ‘Flash Houses’: Public Houses and Geographies of Moral Contagion in 19th-Century London.Eleanor Bland - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):32-55.
    ‘Flash houses’, a distinctive type of public house associated with criminal activity, are a shadowy and little-studied aspect of early 19th-century London. This article situates flash houses within a wide perspective, arguing that the discourses on flash houses were part of concerns about the threat of the urban environment to the moral character of its inhabitants. The article draws on an original synthesis of a range of sources that refer to flash houses, including contemporary literature, newspapers, court documents, and government (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  6
    From Cohort to Community: The Emotional Work of Birthday Cards in the Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development, 1946–2018.Hannah J. Elizabeth & Daisy Payling - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):158-188.
    The Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development is Britain’s longest-running birth cohort study. From their birth in 1946 until the present day, its research participants, or study members, have filled out questionnaires and completed cognitive or physical examinations every few years. Among other outcomes, the findings of these studies have framed how we understand health inequalities. Throughout the decades and multiple follow-up studies, each year the study members have received a birthday card from the survey staff. Although (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  1
    An ‘Ingenious System of Practical Contacts’: Historical Origins and Development of the Institute of Child Welfare Research at Columbia University's Teachers College.Catriel Fierro - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):56-86.
    During the first two decades of the 20th century, the expansion of private foundations and philanthropic initiatives in the United States converged with a comprehensive, nationwide agenda of progressive education and post-war social reconstruction that situated childhood at its core. From 1924 to 1928, the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial was the main foundation behind the aggressive, systematic funding of the child development movement in North America. A pioneering institution, the Institute of Child Welfare Research, established in 1924 at Columbia's Teachers (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  3
    The Emergence of the Idea of ‘the Welfare State’ in British Political Discourse.David Garland - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):132-157.
    This article traces the emergence of the term welfare state in British political discourse and describes competing efforts to define its meaning. It presents a genealogy of the concept's emergence and its subsequent integration into various political scripts, tracing the struggles that sought to name, define, and narrate what welfare state would be taken to mean. It shows that the concept emerged only after the core programmes to which it referred had already been enacted into law and that the referents (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  3
    Race in Post-War Science: The Swiss Case in a Global Context.Pascal Germann - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):216-241.
    The historiography on the concept of race in the post-war sciences has focused predominantly on the UNESCO campaign against scientific racism and on the Anglo-American research community. By way of contrast, this article highlights the history of the concept of race from a thus far unexplored angle: from Swiss research centres and their global interconnections with racial researchers around the world. The article investigates how the acceptance, resonance, and prestige of racial research changed during the post-war years. It analyses what (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  2
    A Code for Care and Control: The PIN as an Operator of Interoperability in the Nordic Welfare State.Ilpo Helén & Marja Alastalo - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):242-265.
    Many states make use of personal identity numbers to govern people living in their territory and jurisdiction, but only a few rely on an all-purpose PIN used throughout the public and private sectors. This article examines the all-purpose PIN in Finland as a political technology that brings people to the sphere of public welfare services and subjects them to governance by public authorities and expert institutions. Drawing on documentary materials and interviews, it unpacks the history and uses of the PIN (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  34
    Not Merely the Absence of Disease: A Genealogy of the WHO’s Positive Health Definition.Lars Thorup Larsen - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):111-131.
    The 1948 constitution of the World Health Organization defines health as ‘a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity’. It was a bold and revolutionary health idea to gain international consensus in a period characterized by fervent anti-communism. This article explores the genealogy of the health definition and demonstrates how it was possible to expand the scope of health, redefine it as ‘well-being’, and overcome ideological resistance to progressive and international (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  14
    Madness, Virtue, and Ecology: A Classical Indian Approach to Psychiatric Disturbance.Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):3-31.
    The Caraka Saṃhitā, the first classical Indian medical compendium, covers a wide variety of pharmacological and therapeutic treatment, while also sketching out a philosophical anthropology of the human subject who is the patient of the physicians for whom this text was composed. In this article, I outline some of the relevant aspects of this anthropology – in particular, its understanding of ‘mind’ and other elements that constitute the subject – before exploring two ways in which it approaches ‘psychiatric’ disorder: one (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  1
    ‘A Troublesome Girl is Pushed Through’: Morality, Biological Determinism, Resistance, Resilience, and the Canadian Child Migration Schemes, 1883–1939.Wendy Sims-Schouten - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):87-110.
    This article critically analyses correspondence and decisions regarding children/young people who were included in the Canadian child migration schemes that ran between 1883 and 1939, and those who were deemed ‘undeserving’ and outside the scope of the schemes. Drawing on critical realist ontology, a metatheory that centralises the causal non-linear dynamics and generative mechanisms in the individual, the cultural sphere, and wider society, the research starts from the premise that the principle of ‘less or more eligibility’ lies at the heart (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  3
    Discourses on Im/Migrants, Ethnic Minorities, and Infectious Disease: Fifty Years of Tuberculosis Reporting in the United Kingdom.Hella von Unger & Penelope Scott - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):189-215.
    Ethnicity and im/migrant classification systems and their constituent categories have a long history in the construction of public health knowledge on tuberculosis in the United Kingdom. This article critically examines the categories employed and the epidemiological discourses on TB, im/migrants, and ethnic minorities in health reporting between 1965 and 2015. We employ a Sociology of Knowledge Approach to Discourse Analysis to trace the continuities and changes in the categories used and in the discursive construction of im/migrants, ethnic minorities, and TB. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues