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  1.  1
    Globalizing the Scientific Bandwagon: Trajectories of Precision Medicine in China and Brazil.Renan Gonçalves Leonel da Silva & Larry Au - 2021 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 46 (1):192-225.
    Precision medicine is emerging as a scientific bandwagon within the contemporary biomedical sciences in the United States. PM brings together concepts and tools from genomics and bioinformatics to develop better diagnostics and therapies based on individualized information. Developing countries like China and Brazil have also begun pursuing PM projects, motivated by a desire to claim genomic sovereignty over its population. In spite of commonalities, institutional arrangements produced by the history of genomics research in China and Brazil are ushering PM along (...)
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  2. Cloaking the Pregnancy: Scientific Uncertainty and Gendered Burden Among Middle-Class Mothers in Urban China.Jialin Li - 2021 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 46 (1):3-28.
    In this article, I use radiation-shielding maternity clothes as a window to explore motherhood and reproductive uncertainty in urban China. By engaging with literature on scientific uncertainty and intensive mothering, I argue that the scientific uncertainty over the possible negative impact of electromagnetic radiation on pregnancy has led to a situation in which uncertainty is being socially reproduced by experts, markets, and policy makers through different media channels. Middle-class mothers do not fully believe that the cloak is scientifically trustworthy. But (...)
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  3. Is Technology Value-Neutral?Boaz Miller - 2021 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 46 (1):53-80.
    According to the Value-Neutrality Thesis, technology is morally and politically neutral, neither good nor bad. A knife may be put to bad use to murder an innocent person or to good use to peel an apple for a starving person, but the knife itself is a mere instrument, not a proper subject for moral or political evaluation. While contemporary philosophers of technology widely reject the VNT, it remains unclear whether claims about values in technology are just a figure of speech (...)
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  4. Making Digital Territory: Cybersecurity, Techno-Nationalism, and the Moral Boundaries of the State.Norma Möllers - 2021 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 46 (1):112-138.
    Drawing on an analysis of German national cybersecurity policy, this paper argues that cybersecurity has become a key site in which states mobilize science and technology to produce state power. Contributing to science and technology studies work on technoscience and statecraft, I develop the concepts of “territorialization projects” and “digital territory” to capture how the production of state power in the digital age increasingly relies on technoscientific expertise about information infrastructure, shifting tasks of government into the domain of computer scientists (...)
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  5. The Developmental State and Public Participation: The Case of Energy Policy-Making in Post–Fukushima Japan.Hiro Saito - 2021 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 46 (1):139-165.
    After the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, the Japanese government tried to democratize energy policy-making by introducing public participation. Over the course of its implementation, however, public participation came to be subordinated to expert committees as the primary mechanism of policy rationalization. The expert committees not only neutralized the results of public participation but also discounted the necessity of public participation itself. This trajectory of public participation, from its historic introduction to eventual collapse, can be fully explained only in reference to (...)
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  6.  1
    Governing Uncertainty or Uncertain Governance? Information Security and the Challenge of Cutting Ties.Rebecca Slayton - 2021 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 46 (1):81-111.
    Information security governance has become an elusive goal and a murky concept. This paper problematizes both information security governance and the broader concept of governance. What does it mean to govern information security, or for that matter, anything? Why have information technologies proven difficult to govern? And what assurances can governance provide for the billions of people who rely on information technologies every day? Drawing together several distinct bodies of literature—including multiple strands of governance theory, actor–network theory, and scholarship on (...)
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  7. Ruination Science: Producing Knowledge From a Toxic World.Sebastian Ureta - 2021 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 46 (1):29-52.
    The multiple environmental crises our planet is experiencing forces us to change the ways we engage with it, especially the ones developed by scientific disciplines such as toxicology. In particular, widespread degradation should lead us to develop scientific practices that take environmental ruination as a framework condition, not only as an object of analysis. In doing so, we should take into account the practice of science at laboratories located in the peripheries of global science, institutions that have coexisted with extensive (...)
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  8.  2
    Methodology, Legend, and Rhetoric: The Constructions of AI by Academia, Industry, and Policy Groups for Lifelong Learning.Erin Young & Rebecca Eynon - 2021 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 46 (1):166-191.
    Artificial intelligence is again attracting significant attention across all areas of social life. One important sphere of focus is education; many policy makers across the globe view lifelong learning as an essential means to prepare society for an “AI future” and look to AI as a way to “deliver” learning opportunities to meet these needs. AI is a complex social, cultural, and material artifact that is understood and constructed by different stakeholders in varied ways, and these differences have significant social (...)
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