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  1.  1
    When Lying is More Than Deceiving : A Pragmatic Study of Lying, Based on the Relevance-Adaptation Model.Xin Li & Yumeng Yuan - 2020 - Pragmatics and Society 11 (1):124-148.
    Lying is a common but controversial verbal phenomenon in human society. This paper aims to uncover the motivation and mechanism of lying as regards its definition, classification and operation by analyzing both the speaker’s production and the addressee’s interpretation process. The Relevance-Adaptation Model is adopted as its theoretical framework. Lying cases, retrieved from an American TV drama Lie to Me, are analyzed from different perspectives to provide concrete evidence for the theoretical assumptions. The findings are two-fold: Theoretically, this paper formulates (...)
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  2.  1
    Metonymic and Metaphoric Meaning Extensions of Chinese FACE and its Collocations.Zhengjun Lin & Shengxi Jin - 2020 - Pragmatics and Society 11 (1):96-123.
    This paper studies the extension of conventional meanings of Chinese FACE expressions in their collocations as well as the collocations themselves through metonymy and metaphor. The data with five FACE expressions included are sampled from the corpus of Center for Chinese Linguistics at Peking University. The conventional meaning of these five FACE expressions is ‘the surface of the front of the head from the top of the forehead to the base of the chin and from ear to ear’. The conventional (...)
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  3. Charles Goodwin, Co-Operative Action.Kristian Mortensen & Spencer Hazel - 2020 - Pragmatics and Society 11 (1):164-169.
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  4. Discourse Markers as Indicators of Connectedness Between Expositive Illocutionary Acts.Etsuko Oishi - 2020 - Pragmatics and Society 11 (1):1-23.
    There has been consistent interest in discourse makers over the past couple of decades, and various proposals have been put forth regarding their functions. The present paper analyzes discourse markers in general as indicators of types of connectedness between expositive illocutionary acts, which bring about illocutionary effects in discourse. The discourse marker well in particular indicates a gap between the preceding expositive illocutionary act and the present one, signaling the present expositive illocutionary act is of a non-committal type. This gap (...)
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  5. What Makes a Good Story? : Exemplification and Explication of Salient Linguistic Characteristics in a Narrative Preferred by the Majority of a Danish Population.Charlotte Petersen - 2020 - Pragmatics and Society 11 (1):24-44.
    People do things with words, but words also touch people. Aiming to analyze socially preferable linguistic characteristics, the present study exemplifies and explicates the text-linguistically salient characteristics in a narrative most frequently evaluated as ‘appropriate’ by the majority of a Danish population. Asked what is appropriate or inappropriate in a narrative context, the background population repeatedly explained “coherence”, “fiction” and “details” as contextually appropriate. Salient in the preferred narrative was the use of co-textual enhancement, in which one clause enhances the (...)
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  6. Extraordinary Emergencies : Reproducing Moral Discourses of the Child in Institutional Interaction.Daniella Rafaely & Kevin A. Whitehead - 2020 - Pragmatics and Society 11 (1):45-69.
    This report uses audio recorded telephone calls and textual data from an emergency medical services call center to examine the interactional practices through which speakers produce what we call “extraordinary emergencies”, treating the events concerned as requiring moral, as well as medical, attention. Since one of the overarching institutional aims of emergency call centers is to facilitate the efficient provision of medical services, call-takers typically treat reported emergencies as routine events. However, in some instances speakers produce practices that do not (...)
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  7. An Emergent English-Mediated Identity and a Chinese Variety of WE.Asha Tickoo - 2020 - Pragmatics and Society 11 (1):70-95.
    This paper will document an English-learning influenced transformation of self, as a shared experience amongst a community of its Chinese users. The study examines 84 English narratives on the English language learning experience of undergraduate L1 speakers of Mandarin at three proficiency levels: Year II, Year III and Year IV. Identity, expressed in learners’ positioning on ELL, is assessed in its explicit, propositionally represented form, and its linguistically marked implicit counterpart. Implicit positioning is examined at the macro-discoursal level by acknowledging (...)
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  8. A Cognitive-Pragmatic Study of Non-Scalar Implicatures.Yanfei Zhang & Shaojie Zhang - 2020 - Pragmatics and Society 11 (1):149-163.
    Whether or not non-entailment relations generate scalar implicatures is a cutting-edge issue in linguistic pragmatics. The present study intends to argue that, based on the Cognitive Grammar paradigm, non-scalar implicatures generated by non-entailment relations are manifested as cognitive defaults which are conventionally incorporated into symbolic units in schema-instance complexes. Conventions provide a shortcut for the hearer to infer non-scalar implicatures in an unconscious, effortless and automatic way. We maintain that, contrary to neo-Gricean pragmatics, non-entailment relations cannot generate Q-implicatures.
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