37 found

Year:

  1.  5
    Data and Context.Thomas E. Dickins - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):633-642.
    Deacon presents a fascinating model that adds to explanations of the origins of life from physical matter. Deacon’s paper owes much to the work of Howard Pattee, who saw semiotic relations in informational terms, and Deacon binds his model to criticism of current information concepts in biology which he sees as semantically inadequate. In this commentary I first outline the broader project from Pattee, and then I present a cybernetic perspective on information. My claim is that this view of information (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  5
    Facing Up to the Hard Problem of Biosemiotics.Donald Favareau - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):603-615.
    Forty-five years ago, while still an undergraduate student at Western Washington University’s Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies, Terrence Deacon produced as his honours thesis a programmatic manifesto for re-situating the semiotic logic of Charles Sanders Peirce “out of the realm of philosophy and [revealing instead] its necessary association with the information sciences and its close parallels with current systems theories”. Deacon’s project, then and now, has been to show how, within the context of naturally occurring physical processes, Peirce’s essential insight (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  6
    To Understand the Origin of Life We Must First Understand the Role of Normativity.Tom Froese - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):657-663.
    Deacon develops a minimal model of a nonparasitic virus to explore how nucleotide sequences came to be characterized by a code-like informational at the origin of life. The model serves to problematize the concept of biological normativity because it highlights two common yet typically implicit assumptions: that life could consist as an inert form, were it not for extrinsic sources of physical instability, and that life could have originated as a singular self-contained individual. I propose that the origin of life, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  8
    Does Autogenic Semiosis Underpin Minimal Cognition?Miguel García-Valdecasas - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):617-624.
    Minimal cognition is an emerging field of research in the context of the life-mind continuity thesis. It stems from the idea that life and mind are strongly continuous, involving the same basic set of organisational principles. Minimal cognition has been sometimes regarded as the analysis of the minimum requirements for the emergence of cognitive phenomena. In the target article, Deacon describes the emergence of the autogenic system as an interpreting system that displays the simplest form of interpretive competence, its most (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  2
    Semiotic and Physical Requirements on Emergent Autogenic System.Cliff Joslyn - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):665-667.
    In “How Molecules Became Signs”, Prof. Deacon outlines a plausible mechanism whereby biochemical systems could be understood to fulfill the conditions of being “alive” in the context of the two broad families of requirements, namely the energetics of metabolism and the informatics of coding. In so doing, he addresses head-on how to account for the origin and the action of coding in physical systems, and thereby the necessary and sufficient conditions for life. I review some of the relevant issues around (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  11
    Autogen is a Kantian Whole in the Non-Entailed World.Stuart Kauffman - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):569-572.
    Deacon suggests the autogen as a minimal Kantian Whole where the parts exist for and by means of the whole. An Autogen is a “for whom” information is created. Semantics of information comes first, syntax later. There are no entailing laws for the emergence and evolution of new meanings, which likely happened long before template replication and the genetic code. The evolution of life and meaning are based on physics but rise creatively above physics.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  7
    A Biosemiotic Perspective on Reward-Based Animal Training Techniques.Amelia Lewis - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):767-782.
    In this paper, I examine the way humans interact with domestic companion animals, with a focus on ‘positive reward-based training’ methods, particularly for dogs. From a biosemiotic perspective, I discuss the role of animal training in today’s society and examine what binary reward- based reinforcement schedules communicate, semiotically. I also examine the extent to which reward-based training methods promote better welfare, when compared to the more traditional methods which rely on aversive stimuli and punishment, if and when they are relied (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  20
    Comment on the Relation between Representation and Information.Ruth Garrett Millikan - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):581-582.
    Deacon’s target article is a welcome contribution not only on “biological information” but, more generally, on representation in cognitive science. Some kind of explanation and justification for use of the terms “representation” and “interpretant” for primordial autogen system would be helpful. A connection between the notions of “information” and “representation” can be elaborated more in this respect.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  4
    Organic Crosstalk: a New Perspective in Medicine.Carlos G. Musso, Victoria P. Musso-Enz, Guido M. Musso-Enz, Olivia Maria Capalbo & Sebastian Porrini - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):829-837.
    Organic crosstalk or intercommunication among different organs is an interesting medical concept based on the biosemiotic perspective which considers the organism as a process maintained by the vital information flow between structural plane and biosemiotic plane, both with their different layers of biological complexity. From this point of view the organ is not merely the structure which produces crosstalk but just as much its product. The crosstalk perspective seeks two main goals: to investigate the characteristic serum biosemiotic patterns of pathogenic (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  3
    Multimodal Modeling: Bridging Biosemiotics and Social Semiotics.Alin Olteanu - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):783-805.
    This paper explores a semiotic notion of body as starting point for bridging biosemiotic with social semiotic theory. The cornerstone of the argument is that the social semiotic criticism of the classic view of meaning as double articulation can support the criticism of language-centrism that lies at the foundation of biosemiotics. Besides the pragmatic epistemological advantages implicit in a theoretical synthesis, I argue that this brings a semiotic contribution to philosophy of mind broadly. Also, it contributes to overcoming the polemic (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  4
    Symbol Grounding Precedes Interpretation.H. H. Pattee - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):561-568.
    Deacon speculates on the origin of interpretation of signs using autocatalytic origin of life models and Peircean terminology. I explain why interpretation evolved only later as a triadic intervention between symbols and actions. In all organisms the passive one-dimensional genetic informational symbol sequences are converted to active functional proteins or nucleic acids by three-dimensional folding. This symbol grounding is a direct symbol-to-action conversion. It is universal throughout all evolution. Folding is entirely a lawful physical process, leaving neither freedom nor necessity (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  1
    Complementarity of Description and the Promise of Semiotics in Dealing with an Eluding Object.Joanna Rączaszek-Leonardi - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):589-595.
    I emphasize the general character of the central claim made by Terrence Deacon about the necessity of complementary description of evolving cognitive systems. Next, I clarify and augment one of the claims made in the paper about the tools offered by information theory. Finally, I point to the need of further clarification of some central notions, which should help to make connections across discourses.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  3
    Lessons Learned: the 20th Gatherings in Biosemiotics.Claudio J. Rodríguez H. & Ľudmila Lacková - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):531-536.
    We review the organization and contents of the 20th Gatherings in Biosemiotics. As the organizers, we share our insights from organizing a community research project in the year where the Covid-19 pandemic halted international travel. We try to describe the challenges of putting together the yearly conference on Biosemiotics and the main content that was presented by the research community.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  2
    Resolving Mechanism/Semiotic Duality.Jeremy Sherman - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):573-580.
    Deacon’s approach to resolving mechanism/semiotic duality exemplifies an innovative methodology for imposing greater rigor on abductive assumptions in biosemiotics and beyond. His approach specifies interpretive agents and their responsive effort as the categories of phenomena to be explained. Implicit in his approach are five standards for imposing greater rigor on abduction or categorization, here named and described by the author.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Dynamic Encoding in a Simple Autogenic System.Henry Staten - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):583-587.
    How did molecules become signs? First, according to Deacon, there had to be an interpreter, a physical process capable of making use of some property of a molecule that offered a “semiotic affordance.” He proposes the model of an “autogenic virus,” the most primitive conceivable recursively self-maintaining kind of molecular system that could broach the boundary between physico-chemical process and “interpretive competence.” In this comment I work up to the question of how Deacon introduces concepts such as “representation” and “record” (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  2
    Weismann’s Barrier and Crick’s Barrier Still Preclude Two Kinds of Lamarckism.Koen B. Tanghe - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):675-682.
    In his target article ‘The Illusions of the Modern Synthesis’, Denis Noble argues that the Modern Synthesis is undermined by the major findings of molecular biology. The supposed falsification of Weisman’s Barrier and of standard interpretations of Francis Crick’s Central Dogma has paved the way for Lamarckian forms of inheritance which are prohibited by that theory of evolution. I argue that August Weismann postulated two barriers against two kinds of Lamarckism. However, his second barrier was speculative. It was made more (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  6
    An Integrated Account of Rosen’s Relational Biology and Peirce’s Semiosis. Part II: Analysis of Protein Synthesis.Federico Vega - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):717-741.
    In a previous paper, an integrated account of Rosen’s relational biology and Peirce’s semiosis has been proposed. Both theories have been compared and basic concepts have been posited for the definition of a unified framework for the study of biology, as well as a method for the identification and analysis of the presence of signs in an organism. The analysis of the existence of semiotic actions in an organism must, without a doubt, begin by considering each of the rules that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  2
    Interpretation as a Form of Thermodynamic Work.Felipe A. Veloso - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):625-631.
    In this commentary I present five corollaries that follow the target article “How molecules became signs” by Terrence W. Deacon and also two outstanding questions the article rises. The corollaries revolve around the notion of interpretation as a form of thermodynamic work—specifically, non-expansion or “useful” work. This specific form of work, along with its path-dependent nature, may be critical for the fundamental understanding of semiotic processes, the subjective character of interpretation, and even the nature of viruses.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  6
    The Evolvability of Evolutionary Theories: A Reply to Denis Noble.Andrew M. Winters - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):669-673.
    In this commentary on Denis Noble’s “The Illusions of the Modern Synthesis,” I discuss three illusions he argues exist within the Modern Synthesis. These illusions have the common theme of attempting to identify the correct way of understanding and describing biological systems. I agree with much of Noble’s claims, but offer the language of developmental systems theory as a friendly tool for moving the project forward.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  5
    Semiosis at a Fundamental Level: Wisdom and Innovation.Hongbing Yu - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):597-601.
    Through a simple model of autogenic interpreting system featuring molecular constraint-work dynamics, Deacon critically tackles the issue of the nature of information in living systems and proposes that interpretation of a molecule as information about something else is more important than molecular replication. Two aspects of the target article are highlighted in this commentary. First, Deacon’s illustrations nicely resonate with and instantiate the wisdom in the doctrine of yin-yang in Chinese philosophy. Second, his theorizing demonstrates a bold intellectual innovation with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. The Advent and Fall of a Vocabulary Learning Bias from Communicative Efficiency.David Carrera-Casado & Ramon Ferrer-I.-Cancho - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (2):345-375.
    Biosemiosis is a process of choice-making between simultaneously alternative options. It is well-known that, when sufficiently young children encounter a new word, they tend to interpret it as pointing to a meaning that does not have a word yet in their lexicon rather than to a meaning that already has a word attached. In previous research, the strategy was shown to be optimal from an information theoretic standpoint. In that framework, interpretation is hypothesized to be driven by the minimization of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  2
    Old and New Perspectives on the Nature/Culture Opposition in Biology and Anthropology.Gláucia Silva - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (2):459-478.
    The article explores a change taking place today in the fields of biology and social anthropology, signaling a shared desire to transcend the heuristic effects of the opposition between nature and culture. Acceptance of the idea that random mutations are the sole driving force behind the process of natural selection overlooks the agentive capacity of non-human living beings, revealing an anthropocentric inspiration. To critique the rhetoric surrounding the principle of natural selection, I turn to the anthropology of Tim Ingold and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  16
    Illusions of Linguistics and Illusions of Modern Synthesis: Two Parallel Stories.Alexander Bolshoy & Ľudmila Lacková - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (1):115-119.
    Metaphors involve immense explanatory power and positive impact predominantly in the scientific education and popularization. Still the use of metaphors in science might be a double-edged sword. Introduction of the computer metaphor to many scientific fields in the last century resulted in reductionist approaches, oversimplifications and mechanistic explanations in science as well as in humanities. In this short commentary we developed further the computer metaphor by prof. Noble and the illusions this metaphor led to in genetics, linguistics and consequently DNA (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  8
    Criticizing the Modern Synthesis: between Phenomenal Characteristics and Synthetic Principles.Bohang Chen, Joris Van Poucke & Gertrudis Van de Vijver - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (1):135-140.
    Starting from Denis Noble’s criticism on the modern synthesis, this article argues that the author’s presentation of the modern synthesis focusses too one-sidedly on the phenomenal characteristics of the living, whereby it is made easily suitable to his criticisms, but risks to remain trapped in a territory-struggle; this criticism lacks an explicit focus on logical matters, and more in particular on the synthetic principles required to situate the relevancy or irrelevancy of phenomenal characteristics beyond territory-struggles. A brief sketch of how (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  10
    Ecoacoustics and Multispecies Semiosis: Naming, Semantics, Semiotic Characteristics, and Competencies.Almo Farina, Alice Eldridge & Peng Li - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (1):141-165.
    Biosemiotics to date has focused on the exchange of signals between organisms, in line with bioacoustics; consideration of the wider acoustic environment as a semiotic medium is under-developed. The nascent discipline of ecoacoustics, that investigates the role of environmental sound in ecological processes and dynamics, fills this gap. In this paper we introduce key ecoacoustic terminology and concepts in order to highlight the value of ecoacoustics as a discipline in which to conceptualise and study intra- and interspecies semiosis. We stress (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  72
    Joining Forces Against Neo-Darwinism: Linking Organicism and Biosemiotics.Arran Gare - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (1):61-65.
    The theoretical biologist Waddington drew attention to the damage to scientific progress by COWDUNG – the Conventional Wisdom of the Dominant Group. Despite Popper’s attack on what he called “the bucket theory of science”, that scientific knowledge accumulates incrementally, adding one fact after another, this is now conventional wisdom among biologists. Denis Noble is challenging not only the Neo-Darwinist orthodoxy dominating biology, but revealing the distortions of science produced by this bucket theory of science. The latter is central to understanding (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  14
    The Plurality of Evolutionary Worldviews.Nathalie Gontier - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (1):35-40.
    Evolutionary biologists, evolutionary epistemologists, and biosemioticians have demonstrated that organisms not merely adapt to an external world, but that they actively construct their environmental, sociocultural, and cognitive niches. Denis Noble demonstrates that such is no different for those organisms that engage in science, and he lays bare several crucial assumptions that define the scientific dogmas and practices of evolutionary biology.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  6
    Expanding the Reach of Biosemiotics.Yogi Hale Hendlin - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (1):1-4.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  28
    Signs of Consciousness?Eva Jablonka - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (1):25-29.
    In this commentary I expand on the first of Noble’s illusions, the selection metaphor. Building on my work with Simona Ginsburg on the evolution of minimal consciousness, I argue that the existence of some complex sensory and motor patterns in the living world can be accounted for only through the evolution of conscious choice.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  14
    Natural Selection and Self-Organization Do Not Make Meaning, while the Agent’s Choice Does.Kalevi Kull - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (1):49-53.
    Demonstration of illusiveness of basic beliefs of the Modern Synthesis implies the existence of evolutionary mechanisms that do not require natural selection for the origin of adaptations. This requires adaptive changes that occur independently from replication, but can occasionally become heritable. Plastic self-organizational changes regulated by genome are largely incorporable into the old theory. A fundamentally different source of adaptability is semiosis which includes the agent’s free choice. Adding semiosis into the theory of Extended Evolutionary Synthesis completes the distancing from (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  21
    Response to Denis Noble’s Article “The Illusions of the Modern Synthesis,” Biosemiotics.James A. Shapiro - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (1):73-78.
    The Modern Synthesis was based on Darwin’s gradualist view of evolution and early twentieth Century Mendelian and population genetics. Although early results in microbial and molecular genetics seemed to solidify MS views through the Central Dogma of Molecular Biology, accepting their basic concepts as permanent truths blinded MS proponents to the importance of incompatible discoveries in the second half of the 20th and early 21st Centuries. Discoveries based largely on the DNA record have provided a radically different view of genome (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  14
    Towards a Biosemiotic Theory of Evolution.Alexei A. Sharov - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (1):101-105.
    The target article by Denis Noble is an excellent overview of the illusions of the Modern Synthesis that still remains in textbooks despite of the recent criticism. Overcoming these illusions shows the active role of organisms in the evolutionary process and accounts for additional mechanisms such as plasticity of embryo development, epigenetic heredity, multilevel selection, Baldwin effect, and niche construction, which are components of the Extended Evolutionary Synthesis. Adding these mechanisms is certainly an important step forward, but I argue that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  13
    Evolution without History?Vassiliki Betty Smocovitis - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (1):131-134.
    This essay is a response to Denis Noble’s argument that the evolutionary synthesis was based on illusory science and that it itself is a kind of illusion. The response includes an historical examination of the relationship between evolutionary biology and molecular biology, along with the importance of history in evolutionary biology, which is an historical science. It raises concerns about adherence to one standard evolutionary theory, and urges the reader to consider a more contextualist and historicist approach, one that adopts (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  6
    Making the Umwelt Bubble of the Modern Synthesis Burst.Morten Tønnessen - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (1):121-125.
    Noble rightly emphasizes that some modern evolutionary biologists´ neglect of agency is consequential with regard to our understanding of the natural world and real-world ecological developments. I elaborate on biosemiotic ideas on semiotic agency and explain how organisms can change the environment by way of semiotic causation. I also comment on the human language’s role in human Umwelten, and how our linguistically mediated reality can be self-deceptive – as if we lived in a bubble of our own making. Finally, I (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  3
    On the Use of “Illusion”.Tyler Volk - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (1):127-129.
    In this commentary on Denis Noble’s paper, I focus on his use of the term “illusion,” and juxtapose it with other potential terms, in particular several others he has used for similar points in his book, Dance to the Tune of Life. His use of “illusion,” if more fully explicated, might be of even broader applicability than in his paper. I ask about potential classes of errors in science and remark about his “principle of biological relativity.”.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  13
    A Humanist’s Response to Denis Noble’s “The Illusions of the Modern Synthesis”.Louise Westling - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (1):31-34.
    Denis Noble suggests that biologists who created the Modern Synthesis were taken in by conceptual traps and illusions hidden in the language they used. Rather than blame language itself, my response counters that all writers are responsible for careful attention to the implications of the metaphors they use, and that Richard Dawkins deliberately chose “the selfish gene.” Noble’s concept of biological relativity restores Darwin’s fuller and more nuanced definition of natural selection and shows how it also accounts for Lamarck’s assertion (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  35
    To the End of Dogmatism in Molecular Biology.Guenther Witzany - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (1):67-72.
    Denis Nobel looks at four important misinterpretations of molecular biology concerning evolutionary processes and demonstrates that the new synthesis today looks rather outdated. The modern synthesis is nearly 80 years old. The proponents who worked out the modern synthesis had no access to the current knowledge on cell biology, genetics, epigenetics, RNA biology and virology. Therefore this contribution adds several aspects which Nobel’s article does not explicitly mention, providing some examples for a better understanding of evolutionary novelty.
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues