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  1.  2
    Śaṅkara and the Authorship of the Īśopaniṣadbhāṣya and the Kaṭhopaniṣadbhāṣya.Ivan Andrijanić - 2020 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 24 (2):257-282.
    This article investigates the authorship of the Īśopaniṣadbhāṣya and the Kaṭhopaniṣadbhāṣya, which are traditionally attributed to Śaṅkara. The first part of the article shows that according to Paul Hacker’s criteria of the specific usage of the terms avidyā, nāmarūpa, māyā, and īśvara, there are no grounds upon which to disprove the traditional attribution of the Īśopaniṣadbhāṣya and the Kaṭhopaniṣadbhāṣya to Śaṅkara, although the analysis of the Īśopaniṣadbhāṣya rests mainly on the absence of un-Śaṅkarian features. The second part of the article (...)
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  2.  1
    Avian Artistry: Decoding the Intertextuality Between Mahābhārata and Mārkaṇḍeya Purāṇa.Raj Balkaran - 2020 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 24 (2):199-237.
    Why do four birds narrate the Mārkaṇḍeya Purāṇa? Narrative enframement plays a crucial role in contextualizing Sanskrit literature. The narrative frame of the Mārkaṇḍeya Purāṇa exhibits acute awareness of the framing of the Mahābhārata. The Purāṇa’s Birds are in fact direct descendants of the Śārṅgakas escaping devastation at the cataclysmic burning of the Khāṇḍava Forest. This hair-raising episode serves as the monumental terminal frame of the Ādi Parvan, which, as the epic’s Book of Beginnings, itself serves as inaugural frame for (...)
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  3.  2
    Loving Viṣṇu: His and Hers Perspectives From Sixteenth-Century South India.Ilanit Loewy Shacham - 2020 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 24 (2):143-176.
    Kṛṣṇadevarāya’s sixteenth-century Telugu poem, the Āmuktamālyada, includes the stories of two āḻvārs, Viṣṇucitta and his foster daughter, Āṇṭāḷ. Though the text does not quote from or paraphrase the historical āḻvārs’ poems, it presents two stutis of Viṣṇu’s incarnations—the first a celebratory praise poem sung by Viṣṇucitta, the second a blame-praise uttered by Āṇṭāḷ. Comparing the two stutis in the Āmuktamālyada to the āḻvārs’ poetry in the Tamil Nālāyiradivyaprabandham, this article explores the ways in which the Āmuktamālyada marks various shifts in (...)
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  4.  6
    The Problem of Indifference to Suffering in the Mahābhārata Tradition.Vishal Sharma - 2020 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 24 (2):177-197.
    In the Mahābhārata, Kṛṣṇa is regularly accused of ignoring harm that befalls its various characters. In fact, the Sanskrit verb upekṣ is applied more consistently to Kṛṣṇa than any other figure in the epic. Through its use, both the Mahābhārata and the tradition raise a question: how can Kṛṣṇa be indifferent to two genocides and the mistreatment of Draupadī? Although previous studies on theodicies in the epic have focused on the issue of Kṛṣṇa’s omnipotence in the Mahābhārata, this article argues (...)
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  5.  3
    The Yuktidīpikā on the Origin of the Vedas.Ołena Łucyszyna - 2020 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 24 (2):239-256.
    In this article, I reconstruct the view of the Yuktidīpikā, the most detailed and profound commentary of classical Sāṃkhya, on the origin of the Vedas. A close reading of the text reveals that its unknown author wavered between at least two different views on this issue. The first view is that the authorless but noneternal Vedas evolve from prakṛti at the beginning of a new cycle of existence of the world and merge into prakṛti during a cosmic dissolution. The Yuktidīpikā (...)
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  6. Hawley’s Sūr—and Beyond: A Review Article of Recent Publications (and More) by John Stratton Hawley.John E. Cort - 2020 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 24 (1):125-142.
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  7.  3
    The Mothers and Daughters of Bhakti: Janābāī in Marathi Literature.Madhuri Deshmukh - 2020 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 24 (1):33-59.
    This article focuses on the writings of the lonely, orphaned poet Janābāī, a popular figure believed to have lived in fourteenth-century Maharashtra. By studying the oral tradition of grind-mill songs with which Janābāī is associated as a neglected field of bhakti composition, this article seeks to recuperate the elements of absence, exile, and dislocation central to the devotional lives and experience of bhakti poets, especially those like Janābāī who were and continue to be marginalized by gender and caste. Examining the (...)
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  8.  5
    Some Reflections on the Meaning of Dīkṣā in Kerala According to Mātṛsadbhāvatantra.Maciej Karasinski - 2020 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 24 (1):107-124.
    One of the most important Hindu Tantric rites is known as dīkṣā, an initiation that grants access to mystical knowledge. This initiation enables the individual to perform rites on their own and learn secret spiritual practices from an enlightened master of the tradition. A person who undergoes dīkṣā is never a mere spectator of ritual ceremonies; rather they play an important role in the rituals: they are cognizant of the esoteric techniques and powerful incantations involved. The aim of this article (...)
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  9.  1
    Mobility, Adaptability, and Accessibility: “Cute” Hanumān Figures Among Surinamese Hindu Children in The Netherlands.Priya Swamy & Albertina Nugteren - 2020 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 24 (1):1-32.
    This article asks how the popular deity Hanumān has become one of the central figures for mobilizing a Surinamese Dutch Hindu “devotional public” with a specific appeal to preteen children in The Netherlands. The authors address this research question by examining a particular form of Hanumān, that of the “cuddly” or “cute” Hanumān that has been popularized in animated films such as Return of Hanuman and in cuddly toys sold at specialty stores and market stalls in The Netherlands. Building on (...)
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  10. The Rādhāsoāmī Theory of Subtle Body as an Expression of Religious Inclusivism.Jarosław Zapart - 2020 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 24 (1):61-86.
    This article looks at the yogic theory of subtle body as a hermeneutical and pedagogical tool used by the Rādhāsoāmī tradition to construct an inclusivist strategy for appropriating other religious systems. When constructing the theory of surat-śabd-yoga, the Rādhāsoāmīs took the haṭha yoga of the Nāths as a vital reference point. While rejecting the corporeal techniques of haṭha yoga, they remained influenced by the Nāth theory of subtle body. A thorough modification and expansion of this theory enabled the Rādhāsoāmīs to (...)
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