Year:

  1.  3
    Robert Holcot on Doxastic Voluntarism and the Ethics of Belief.Mark Boespflug - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (4):617-636.
    In the Middle Ages, the view that agents are able to exercise direct voluntary control over their beliefs—doxastic voluntarism—was pervasive. It was held by Augustine, Aquinas, Scotus, Ockham, and Buridan, among many others. Herein, I show that the somewhat neglected Oxford Dominican, Robert Holcot, rejected doxastic voluntarism with a coherence and plausibility that reflects and anticipates much contemporary thought on the issue. I, further, suggest that Holcot’s rejection of the idea that agents can voluntarily control their beliefs is intimately connected (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  3
    Critical Study of Kris McDaniel's The Fragmentation of Being.Ross P. Cameron - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (4):785-795.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  18
    Priors and Prejudices: Comments on Susanna Siegel's The Rationality of Perception.Andy Clark - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (4):741-750.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  4.  4
    The Therapeutic Reconstruction of Affordances.Shaun Gallagher - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (4):719-736.
    I argue that a variety of physical disabilities, and neurological and psychiatric disorders can be understood in terms of changes to the subject’s affordance space. Understanding disorders in this way also has some implications for therapy. On the basis of a phenomenological- and pragmatist-inspired enactivism I propose an affordance-based approach to therapy with a focus on changing physical, social, and cultural environments, and I consider the role of virtual and mixed realities in this context.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  2
    Placing the Human: Establishing Reason by its Participation in Divine Intellect for Boethius and Aquinas.Wayne J. Hankey - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (4):583-615.
    We begin with the kinds of knowing and ignorance in Plato’s allegory of the Line in the Republic, and go on to the problem of the relation of human reason and divine intellection in Aristotle’s Metaphysics, I and XII, De anima, II and III, and, especially, Nicomachean Ethics X, 7 and 8. Plato and Aristotle do not establish the human firmly vis-à-vis the divine and leave the Platonic tradition with a deep philosophical, theological, and religious ambiguity. Passing to Boethius’ Consolation (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  2
    Health, Moral Status, and a Minimal Speciesism.David Hershenov & Rose Hershenov - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (4):693-718.
    The potential for healthy development is the key to determining the moral status of mindless and minimally minded organisms. It even provides the basis for a defense of speciesism. Mindless and minimally minded human beings have interests in the healthy development of sophisticated mental capacities, which explains why they are greatly harmed when death, disease, and other events frustrate those interests. Since the healthy development of members of non-human species doesn’t produce the same sophisticated mental capacities, mindless and minimally minded (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  6
    Fine-Tuned of Necessity?Ben Page - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (4):663-692.
    This paper seeks to explicate and analyze an alternative response to fine-tuning arguments from those that are typically given—namely, design or brute contingency. The response I explore is based on necessity, the necessitarian response. After showing how necessity blocks the argument, I explicate the reply I claim necessitarians can give and suggest how its three requirements can be met: firstly, that laws are metaphysically necessary; secondly, that constants are metaphysically necessary; and thirdly, that the fundamental properties that determine the laws (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  13
    Are Perceptions Reached by Rational Inference? Comments on Susanna Siegel, The Rationality of Perception.Christopher Peacocke - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (4):751-760.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9.  75
    Perception as Guessing Versus Perception as Knowing: Replies to Clark and Peacocke.Susanna Siegel - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (4):761-784.
    A summary of The Rationality of Perception, and my replies to symposium papers on it by Andy Clark and Christopher Peacocke.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  7
    Précis to The Rationality of Perception.Susanna Siegel - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (4):737-739.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  9
    Locke’s Last Word on Freedom.Julie Walsh - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (4):637-661.
    JohnLocke’s 1700–1702 correspondencewith Dutch Arminian Philippus van Limborch has been taken by commentators as the motivation for modifications to the fifth edition of “Of Power,” the chapter in An Essay Concerning Human Understanding that treats freedom. In this paper, I offer the first systematic and chronological study of their correspondence. I argue that the heart of their disagreement is over how they define “freedom of indifference.” Once the importance of the disagreement over indifference is established, it is clear that when (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  91
    God and Interpersonal Knowledge.Matthew A. Benton - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):421-447.
    Recent epistemology offers an account of what it is to know other persons. Such views hold promise for illuminating several issues in philosophy of religion, and for advancing a distinctive approach to religious epistemology. This paper develops an account of interpersonal knowledge, and clarifies its relation to propositional and qualitative knowledge. I then turn to our knowledge of God and God's knowledge of us, and compare my account of interpersonal knowledge with important work by Eleonore Stump on "Franciscan" knowledge. I (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13.  1
    Inclusive Worship and Group Liturgical Action.Joshua Cockayne - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):449-476.
    In this article, I consider how recent work on the philosophy of group-agency and shared-agency can help us to understand what it is for a church to act in worship. I argue that to assess a model’s suitability for providing such an account, we must consider how well it handles cases of non-paradigm participants, such as those with autism spectrum disorder and young infants. I suggest that whilst a shared-agency model helps to clarify how individuals coordinate actions in cases of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  1
    Religious 1 B Eliefs and 1 P Hilosophical 1 V Iews: A 1 Q Ualitative 1 S Tudy.Helen De Cruz - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):477-504.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  63
    Religious Beliefs and Philosophical Views A Qualitative Study.Helen De Cruz - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):477-504.
    Philosophy of religion is often regarded as a philosophical discipline in which irrelevant influences, such as upbringing and education, play a pernicious role. This paper presents results of a qualitative survey among academic philosophers of religion to examine the role of such factors in their work. In light of these findings, I address two questions: an empirical one (whether philosophers of religion are influenced by irrelevant factors in forming their philosophical attitudes) and an epistemological one (whether the influence of irrelevant (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  2
    Disagreement From the Religious Margins.Katherine Dormandy - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):371-395.
    Religious communities often discourage disagreement with religious authorities, on the grounds that allowing it would be epistemically detrimental. I argue that this attitude is mistaken, because any social position in a community—including religious authority—comes with epistemic advantages as well as epistemic limitations. I argue that religious communities stand to benefit epistemically by engaging in disagreement with people occupying other social positions. I focus on those at the community’s margins and argue that religious marginalization is apt to yield religiously important insights; (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  9
    Leibniz, a Friend of Molinism.Juan Garcia - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):397-420.
    Leibniz is commonly labeled a foe of Molinism. His rejection of robust libertarian freedom coupled with some explicit passages in which he distances himself from the doctrine of middle knowledge seem to justify this classification. In this paper, I argue that this standard view is not quite correct. I identify the two substantive tenets of Molinism. First, the connection between the conditions for free actions and these free actions is a contingent one: free actions follow contingently from their sufficient conditions. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  5
    Divine Ineffability and Franciscan Knowledge.Lorraine Juliano Keller - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):347-370.
    There’s been a recent surge of interest among analytic philosophers of religion in divine ineffability. However, divine ineffability is part of a traditional conception of God that has been widely rejected among analytic philosophers of religion for the past few decades. One of the main reasons that the traditional conception of God has been rejected is because it allegedly makes God too remote, unknowable, and impersonal. In this paper, I present an account of divine ineffability that directly addresses this concern (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19.  2
    The Shattered Spiritual Self: A Philosophical Exploration of Religious Trauma.Michelle Panchuk - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):505-530.
    In this paper I consider what a person who finds herself religiously incapacitated ought to do. More specifically, I address people who have come to God asking for bread, but who seem to have received stones and serpents in its place. This is a manifestation of the phenomenon that I call religious trauma. My goals in this paper are twofold. First, I aim to demonstrate that, because religious trauma can be genuinely religiously incapacitating, it can result in non-culpable failure to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  13
    Belief in a Fallen World.Robert Pasnau - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):531-559.
    In an ideal epistemic world, our beliefs would correspond to our evidence, and our evidence would be bountiful. In the world we live in, however, if we wish to live meaningful lives, other epistemic strategies are necessary. Here I attempt to work out, systematically, the ways in which evidentialism fails us as a guide to belief. This is so preeminently for lives of a religious character, but the point applies more broadly.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  2
    A Conceptual Analysis of Glory.Paul Silva - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):561-582.
    Although the concept of glory has a central place in religious thought, philosophers of religion have had remarkably little to say about glory. What follows is a philosophical analysis of two distinct concepts we express with the term ‘glory’ and an explanation of how we can use one of them to dislodge Bayne and Nagasawa’s recent atheological argument from worship.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  37
    In Black and White: A Hermeneutic Argument Against "Transracialism".Tina Fernandes Botts - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (2):303-329.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  1
    In Black and White.Tina Fernandes Botts - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (2):303-329.
    Transracialism, defined as both experiencing oneself as, and being, a race other than the race assigned to one by society, does not exist. Translated into hermeneutics, transracialism is an unintelligible phenomenon in the specific sociocultural context of the United States in the early twenty-first century. Within this context, race is a function of ancestry, and is therefore defined in terms of something that is external to the self and unchangeable. Since transracialism does not exist, the question of whether transracialism would (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  10
    Killing Boogeymen: Phallicism and the Misandric Mischaracterizations of Black Males in Theory.Tommy J. Curry - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (2):235-272.
    Black males have been characterized as violent, misogynist, predatory rapists by gender theorists dating back to mid-nineteenth–century ethnologists to contemporary intersectional feminists. These caricatures of Black men and boys are not rooted in any actual studies or empirical findings, but the stereotypes found throughout various racist social scientific literatures that held Black males to be effeminate while nonetheless hyper-masculine and delinquent. This paper argues that contemporary gender theories not only deny the peculiar sexual oppression of racialized outgroup males under patriarchy, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  15
    Thinking Through Some Themes of Race and More.Lewis R. Gordon - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (2):331-345.
    This article is a reflective essay, drawing upon insights on racism and related forms of oppression as expressions of bad faith, on several influential movements in contemporary philosophy of race and racism. The author pays particular attention to theories from the global south addressing contemporary debates ranging from Euromodernity, philosophical anthropology, and the racialization of First Nations or Amerindians to intersectionality theory, discourses on privilege, decolonization, and creolization.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  7
    Necro-Being: An Actuarial Account of Racism.Leonard Harris - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (2):273-302.
    I argue that racism is a form of necro-being entrapped in necro-tragedy. Necro-being, as I present it, is a condition that kills and prevents persons from being born. I defend a conception of tragedy: absolute necrotragedy; absolute irredeemable suffering in a non-moral universe. Explanations of racism are commonly subject to anomalies, for example, volitional accounts offer special desiderata to account for institutional racism; conversely for institutional accounts. I offer a way to see racism, given the existence of a vast array (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  11
    Democracy, Identity, and Politics.Michele M. Moody-Adams - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (2):199-218.
    Democratic politics is always identity politics and there are some varieties of identity politics without which full and genuine democratic cooperation would not be possible. Indeed, the very existence of a democratic people involves mobilization of political concern and action around a democratic national identity. But a genuinely democratic national identity must be an open identity that can accommodate internal complexity and acknowledge external responsibilities. Moreover, in democracies characterized by a history of discrimination and oppression, there must also be political (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  17
    Wagering with and Without Pascal.Daniel Collette & Joseph Anderson - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (1):95-110.
    Pascal’s wager has received the attention of philosophers for centuries. Most of its criticisms arise from how the wager is often framed. We present Pascal’s wager three ways: in isolation from any further apologetic arguments, as leading toward a regimen intended to produce belief, and finally embedded in a larger apology that includes evidence for Christianity. We find that none of the common objections apply when the wager is presented as part of Pascal’s larger project. Pascal’s wager is a successful (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  5
    Contemporary Claims of Political Injustice: History and the Race to the Bottom.Naomi Zack - 2018 - Res Philosophica:219-233.
    Injustice theory better serves the oppressed than theories of justice or ideal theory. Humanitarian injustice, political injustice, and legal injustice are distinguished by the rules they violate. Not all who claim political injustice have valid historical grounds, which include past oppression and its legacy. Social class, including culture as well as money, helps explain competing claims of political injustice better than racial identities. Claims of political injustice by the White Mass Recently Politicized are not valid given the history of race (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues