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  1.  78
    God and Interpersonal Knowledge.Matthew A. Benton - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):421-447.
    Recent epistemology offers an account of what it is to know other persons. Such views hold promise for illuminating several issues in philosophy of religion, and for advancing a distinctive approach to religious epistemology. This paper develops an account of interpersonal knowledge, and clarifies its relation to propositional and qualitative knowledge. I then turn to our knowledge of God and God's knowledge of us, and compare my account of interpersonal knowledge with important work by Eleonore Stump on "Franciscan" knowledge. I (...)
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  2. Inclusive Worship and Group Liturgical Action.Joshua Cockayne - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):449-476.
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  3. Religious 1 B Eliefs and 1 P Hilosophical 1 V Iews: A 1 Q Ualitative 1 S Tudy.Helen De Cruz - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):477-504.
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  4.  18
    Religious Beliefs and Philosophical Views A Qualitative Study.Helen De Cruz - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):477-504.
    Philosophy of religion is often regarded as a philosophical discipline in which irrelevant influences, such as upbringing and education, play a pernicious role. This paper presents results of a qualitative survey among academic philosophers of religion to examine the role of such factors in their work. In light of these findings, I address two questions: an empirical one (whether philosophers of religion are influenced by irrelevant factors in forming their philosophical attitudes) and an epistemological one (whether the influence of irrelevant (...)
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  5. Disagreement From the Religious Margins.Katherine Dormandy - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):371-395.
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  6. Leibniz, a Friend of Molinism.Juan Garcia - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):397-420.
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  7. Divine Ineffability and Franciscan Knowledge.Lorraine Juliano Keller - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):347-370.
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  8. The Shattered Spiritual Self: A Philosophical Exploration of Religious Trauma.Michelle Panchuck - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):505-530.
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  9. Belief in a Fallen World.Robert Pasnau - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):531-559.
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  10.  31
    In Black and White: A Hermeneutic Argument Against "Transracialism".Tina Fernandes Botts - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (2):303-329.
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  11.  1
    In Black and White.Tina Fernandes Botts - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (2):303-329.
    Transracialism, defined as both experiencing oneself as, and being, a race other than the race assigned to one by society, does not exist. Translated into hermeneutics, transracialism is an unintelligible phenomenon in the specific sociocultural context of the United States in the early twenty-first century. Within this context, race is a function of ancestry, and is therefore defined in terms of something that is external to the self and unchangeable. Since transracialism does not exist, the question of whether transracialism would (...)
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  12.  4
    Killing Boogeymen: Phallicism and the Misandric Mischaracterizations of Black Males in Theory.Tommy J. Curry - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (2):235-272.
    Black males have been characterized as violent, misogynist, predatory rapists by gender theorists dating back to mid-nineteenth–century ethnologists to contemporary intersectional feminists. These caricatures of Black men and boys are not rooted in any actual studies or empirical findings, but the stereotypes found throughout various racist social scientific literatures that held Black males to be effeminate while nonetheless hyper-masculine and delinquent. This paper argues that contemporary gender theories not only deny the peculiar sexual oppression of racialized outgroup males under patriarchy, (...)
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  13.  14
    Thinking Through Some Themes of Race and More.Lewis R. Gordon - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (2):331-345.
    This article is a reflective essay, drawing upon insights on racism and related forms of oppression as expressions of bad faith, on several influential movements in contemporary philosophy of race and racism. The author pays particular attention to theories from the global south addressing contemporary debates ranging from Euromodernity, philosophical anthropology, and the racialization of First Nations or Amerindians to intersectionality theory, discourses on privilege, decolonization, and creolization.
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  14.  6
    Necro-Being: An Actuarial Account of Racism.Leonard Harris - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (2):273-302.
    I argue that racism is a form of necro-being entrapped in necro-tragedy. Necro-being, as I present it, is a condition that kills and prevents persons from being born. I defend a conception of tragedy: absolute necrotragedy; absolute irredeemable suffering in a non-moral universe. Explanations of racism are commonly subject to anomalies, for example, volitional accounts offer special desiderata to account for institutional racism; conversely for institutional accounts. I offer a way to see racism, given the existence of a vast array (...)
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  15.  6
    Democracy, Identity, and Politics.Michele M. Moody-Adams - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (2):199-218.
    Democratic politics is always identity politics and there are some varieties of identity politics without which full and genuine democratic cooperation would not be possible. Indeed, the very existence of a democratic people involves mobilization of political concern and action around a democratic national identity. But a genuinely democratic national identity must be an open identity that can accommodate internal complexity and acknowledge external responsibilities. Moreover, in democracies characterized by a history of discrimination and oppression, there must also be political (...)
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  16.  12
    Wagering with and Without Pascal.Joseph Anderson & Daniel Collette - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (1):95-110.
    Pascal’s wager has received the attention of philosophers for centuries. Most of its criticisms arise from how the wager is often framed. We present Pascal’s wager three ways: in isolation from any further apologetic arguments, as leading toward a regimen intended to produce belief, and finally embedded in a larger apology that includes evidence for Christianity. We find that none of the common objections apply when the wager is presented as part of Pascal’s larger project. Pascal’s wager is a successful (...)
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  17.  5
    Contemporary Claims of Political Injustice: History and the Race to the Bottom.Naomi Zack - 2018 - Res Philosophica:219-233.
    Injustice theory better serves the oppressed than theories of justice or ideal theory. Humanitarian injustice, political injustice, and legal injustice are distinguished by the rules they violate. Not all who claim political injustice have valid historical grounds, which include past oppression and its legacy. Social class, including culture as well as money, helps explain competing claims of political injustice better than racial identities. Claims of political injustice by the White Mass Recently Politicized are not valid given the history of race (...)
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