7 found

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  1.  4
    The Failure of the Sacraments in Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner.Joshua Avery - 2020 - Renascence 72 (2):87-98.
    This essay argues that Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner represents in its imagery a tension within Coleridge prior to his conversion to Anglicanism. Specifically, the poem’s treatment of institutional sacraments argues for their apparent inefficacy, at least from the Mariner’s vantage point. The sacramental idea upheld by a High Church view would suggest that particular earthly institutions, such as Holy Communion or matrimony, could function as actual and not merely symbolic vehicles of divine grace. The Rime, however, displays a (...)
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  2.  4
    Editor's Page.John E. Curran - 2020 - Renascence 72 (2):65-65.
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  3.  2
    The Decency of Albert Camus.Jesus Deogracias Principe - 2020 - Renascence 72 (2):99-120.
    This essay explores the place of decency and the decent man in the moral and religious thought of Albert Camus. Focusing primarily on the major fictional works, we consider how Camus employs the semantic ambiguity inherent in the notion of being decent, and then develops this into a normative ethical call characterized by responsibility and solidarity. We then explore further how Camus pushes the envelope to make us reflect on whether decency is even possible, both in the sense of addressing (...)
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  4.  3
    Theft as Gift: Percy, Peirce, and Bible in The Second Coming.Franklin Arthur Wilson - 2020 - Renascence 72 (2):67-85.
    This article explores Walker Percy’s use of Charles Sanders Peirce’s concept of “Thirdness” as an interpretive tool in connection with Percy’s use of the Bible in his novel, The Second Coming. In this context, Peirce’s “Thirdness” may be understood as that which mediates between a word and a thing as, indeed, Walker Percy defines “Thirdness” in his essay, “The Delta Factor”. As such, C.S. Peirce’s “Thirdness” serves Percy as a model for understanding the function of “triadic” language in the operation (...)
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  5.  2
    Parker’s Black? A Rereading of Race in Flannery O’Connor’s "Parker’s Back".Christine Grogan - 2020 - Renascence 72 (1):25-42.
    Contributing to the uneasy question of race in Flannery O’Connor's fiction, this article performs a rereading of the last story she penned—“Parker’s Back”—and argues that her final protagonist may have been a product of miscegenation. It discusses the implications this would have on our understanding of this spiritually rich story, and, perhaps even more importantly, of O’Connor’s views on race at the end of her life.
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  6.  3
    Heroes, Tyrants, Howls.Steven Knepper - 2020 - Renascence 72 (1):3-23.
    In recent decades, the philosopher William Desmond has offered both insightful readings of individual tragedies and a striking reformulation of old Aristotelian standbys like hamartia and catharsis. This reformulation grows out of his wider philosophy of the “between,” which stresses humans’ fundamental receptivity or “porosity.” For Desmond, tragedy strips away characters’ self-determination and returns them to porosity. The audience is returned to porosity as well, a process of exposure that can be harrowing, and at times leads to despair, but that (...)
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  7.  2
    Revising Orthodoxy in the Poems of Robert Southwell.Amber True - 2020 - Renascence 72 (1):43-60.
    Community is the framework for the Christian experience. The Greek text from which the English bible is translated uses the ἐκκλησια, which means “assembly,” “assemblage, gathering, meeting,” and in the earliest text, “the universal church to which all believers belong.” Thus, the very idea of Christianity after Christ suggests community. Robert Southwell trained to contribute to a very particular portion of the Christian community in Elizabethan England, but the lyric poetry he produced during this time represents community as flawed and (...)
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