21 found

Year:

  1.  7
    A Stoic Ethics for Attention.Charles Brittain - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (2):224-246.
    Seneca’s Letters sketch a theory of attentive action according to which distraction is caused by inconsistent beliefs about values, such that the degree of an agent’s attention to an endorsed action is proportionate to the consistency of her beliefs about value, i. e. her proximity to virtue. The agent’s activity of attentive action is co-ordinated with a state of alertness to her interests, which accordingly triggers switches in attention that sustain the endorsed action in single-minded agents or cause distraction if (...)
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  2.  3
    The Stoic Provenance of the Notion of Prosochê.Katerina Ierodiakonou - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (2):202-223.
    Late Stoics and, in particular, Epictetus made ample use of the notion of attention, which they understood as the soul’s vigilant focus on sense impressions and on the Stoic principles. Attention, in their view, was meant to assist our self-examination and lead to ethical progress. It was thus regarded as a Stoic good and a constitutive part of eudaimonia. Early Stoics did not seem to have invoked such a notion, whereas the Neoplatonists appropriated it into their psychology by postulating the (...)
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  3.  4
    Attention in Augustine.Lenka Karfíková - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (2):247-270.
    The article treats the role of attention in Augustine’s analysis of sense perception, the notion of time, and the Trinitarian structure of the human mind. The term intentio covers a broad range of meanings in Augustine’s usage. Its most fundamental meaning is the life-giving presence of the soul in the body, intensified in attention’s being concentrated on a particular thing or experience; Augustine also uses the term attentio in this latter sense. According to his analysis of time, by way of (...)
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  4.  11
    From Natural Tendencies to Perceptual Interests and Motivation in Plato’s Timaeus.Pauliina Remes - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (2):157-178.
    In the Timaeus, human bodies are treated as homeostatic systems, striving to maintain their natural state. This striving constitutes Plato’s explanatory framework for perception: perceptions come about when the equilibrium is shaken, and when it is restored. The article makes two main suggestions: first, that experienced pleasure and pain are grounded in non-experiential departures from and restorations of the natural state. Second, that the striving to maintain the natural state grounds perceptual interests, especially through conscious algesic and hedonic affection. Explanation (...)
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  5.  7
    The Epicurean Notion of Epibolê.Voula Tsouna - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (2):179-201.
    The surviving writings of Epicurus and his followers contain several references to epibolê – a puzzling notion that does not receive discussion in the extant Epicurean texts. There is no consensus about what epibolê is, what it is of, and what it operates on and, moreover, its epistemological status is controversial. This article aims to address these issues in both Epicurus and later Epicurean authors. Part One focuses mainly on Epicurus’ Letter to Herodotus, highlights a crucial distinction hitherto unnoticed in (...)
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  6.  3
    Introduction.Máté Veres & David Machek - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (2):151-156.
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  7. Aristotle on Flight: Air as an External Resting Point.Daniel Coren - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (1):123-138.
    I reconstruct Aristotle’s explanation for why and how birds are capable of natural flight. For Aristotle, air is a markedly different external resting point in comparison with water and earth, and nature has designed birds so as to take advantage of the unique way in which air affects the inequality between the pushing downward, that is, the downward force and the resistance. My discussion sheds some light on Aristotle’s anticipation of some aspects of modern fluid dynamics and aerodynamics.
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  8.  6
    Devin Henry, Aristotle on Matter, Form, and Moving Causes. The Hylomorphic Theory of Substantial Generation. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2019. Ix + 246 Pp, ISBN 978-1108475570, GBP 75. Https://Doi.Org/10.1017/9781108646680Aristotle on Matter, Form, and Moving Causes. The Hylomorphic Theory of Substantial Generation. [REVIEW]Andrea Falcon - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (1):139-142.
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  9.  5
    The Zoogonies of Empedocles Reconsidered.Chiara Ferella - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (1):1-26.
    The studies of Empedocles have made headway in showing that Empedocles postulated a double zoogony. Whereas this has been traditionally related to the hypothesis of two worlds per cycle, some Empedoclean fragments provide evidence for a double zoogony in a cosmic cycle with one world. How can we reconcile the hypothesis of two zoogonies with the assumption of a unique world? Whereas there have been attempts to address this question by retaining the traditional idea of two opposite zoogonic periods or (...)
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  10. The First City and First Soul in Plato’s Republic.Jerry Green - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (1):50-83.
    One puzzling feature of Plato’s Republic is the First City or ‘city of pigs’. Socrates praises the First City as a “true”, “healthy” city, yet Plato abandons it with little explanation. I argue that the problem is not a political failing, as most previous readings have proposed: the First City is a viable political arrangement, where one can live a deeply Socratic lifestyle. But the First City has a psychological corollary, that the soul is simple rather than tripartite. Plato sees (...)
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  11. Marilena Vlad, Damascius et l’ineffable: récit de l’impossible discours, Vrin, Paris, 2019; ISBN: 978-2-7116-2873-5, EUR 28.Damascius et l’ineffable: récit de l’impossible discours. [REVIEW]Jonathan Greig - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (1):143-149.
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  12.  13
    Plato on Self-Motion in Laws X.Rareș Ilie Marinescu - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (1):96-122.
    In this paper, I argue that Plato conceives self-motion as non-spatial in Laws X. I demonstrate this by focusing on the textual evidence and by refuting interpretations according to which self-motion either is a specific type of spatial motion or is said to require space as a necessary condition for its occurrence. Moreover, I show that this non-spatial understanding differs from the identification of the soul’s motion with locomotion in the Timaeus. Consequently, I provide an explanation for this difference between (...)
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  13.  4
    The Playful Role of the Girl in Empedocles’ B100.Nathasja van Luijn - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (1):27-49.
    Empedocles’ B100 contains an analogy between a girl handling a clepsydra and respiration. This article argues that proposals to establish Love or Persephone as the girl’s respiratory equivalent are rendered unlikely by differences between their respective causal roles. Rather than her gender, this article emphasises the importance of the girl’s age: Empedocles required a playful child to handle the clepsydra. This child’s play results in the extra phase of submerging the clepsydra while the upper vent is open, which Empedocles needed (...)
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  14.  10
    Getting Younger.Daniel Vázquez - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (1):84-95.
    I argue that in Plato’s Parmenides 141a6–c4, things in time come to be simultaneously older and younger than themselves because a thing’s past and present selves are both real. As a result, whatever temporal relation is predicated of any of these past and present selves is true of the thing in question. Unlike other interpretations, this reading neither assumes that things in time have to replace their parts, nor that time is circular. I conclude that the passage is committed to (...)
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  15.  16
    Plato’s Theaetetus and the Hunting of the Proposition.Lesley Brown - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):268-288.
    Section 1 contrasts the approaches to Plato of F.M.Cornford and Gilbert Ryle, two of the early twentieth century’s leading Plato interpreters. Then I trace and evaluate attempts to discern in Plato’s Theaetetus a recognition of the role of the proposition. Section 2 focuses on the hunting of the proposition in Socrates’ Dream in the Theaetetus. Ryle, inspired by Logical Atomism, argued that Plato there anticipated an insight about the difference between names and propositions that Russell credited to Wittgenstein. I rehearse (...)
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  16.  2
    The Pursuit of Parmenidean Clarity.Jenny Bryan - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):218-238.
    This paper reconsiders the debates around the interpretation of Parmenides’ Being, in order to draw out the preconceptions that lie behind such debates and to scrutinize the legitimacy of applying them to a text such as Parmenides’ poem. With a focus on the assumptions that have driven scholars to seek clarity within the notoriously ambiguous verse of the poem, I ask whether it is possible to develop an analysis of Parmenides’ Being that is sympathetic both to his clear interest in (...)
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  17.  8
    The Scandal of Deduction and Aristotle’s Method for Discovering Syllogisms.Matthew Duncombe - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):289-311.
    If a deductive argument is valid, then the conclusion is not novel. If the conclusion of an argument is not novel, the argument is not useful. So, if a deductive argument is valid, it is not useful. This conclusion,, is unacceptable. Since the argument is valid, we must reject at least one premise. So, should we reject or? This puzzle is usually known as the ‘scandal of deduction’. Analytic philosophers have tried to reject but have assumed premise. I argue here (...)
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  18.  3
    Paying the Price: Contextualizing Exchange in Phaedo 69a–C.Kathryn Morgan - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):239-267.
    This paper uses a problematic passage at Phaedo 69a–c as a case study to explore the advantages we can gain by reading Plato in his cultural context. Socrates argues that the common conception of courage is strange: people fear death, but endure it because they are afraid of greater evils. They are thus brave through fear. He proposes that we should not exchange greater pleasures, pains, and fears for lesser, like coins, but that there is the only correct coin, for (...)
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  19.  6
    Introduction.Catherine Rowett - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):149-157.
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  20.  13
    Analytic Philosophy, the Ancient Philosopher Poets and the Poetics of Analytic Philosophy.Catherine Rowett - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):158-182.
    The paper starts with reflections on Plato’s critique of the poets and the preference many express for Aristotle’s view of poetry. The second part of the paper takes a case study of analytic treatments of ancient philosophy, including the ancient philosopher poets, to examine the poetics of analytic philosophy, diagnosing a preference in Analytic philosophy for a clean non-poetic style of presentation, and then develops this in considering how well historians of philosophy in the Analytic tradition can accommodate the contributions (...)
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  21.  15
    Drafted Into a Foreign War?: On the Very Idea of Ancient Philosophy as a Way of Life.Matthew Sharpe - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):183-217.
    This paper examines the central criticisms that come, broadly, from the modern, ‘analytic’ tradition, of Pierre Hadot’s idea of ancient philosophy as a way of life.: Firstly, ancient philosophy just did not or could not have involved anything like the ‘spiritual practices’ or ‘technologies of the self’, aiming at curing subjects’ unnecessary desires or bettering their lives, contra Hadot and Foucault et al. Secondly, any such metaphilosophical account of putative ‘philosophy’ must unacceptably downplay the role of ‘serious philosophical reasoning’ or (...)
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