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  1.  1
    Intellectual History as History of Engagement? The French Scholarship.Massimo Asta - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (2):649-659.
    Few intellectual histories of France by non-French authors in recent years have produced the bitter polemic that Tony Judt's Past Imperfect: French intellectuals elicited. Published in French at the same time as the English edition in 1992, the book was held to account for its questionable historiographical legitimacy, alleged inaccuracy in the treatment of sources, and not-so-hidden partisanship, even if it also received some positive reviews from authoritative specialists in the field in important national newspapers. Nevertheless, the general tone and (...)
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  2.  1
    Intellectual History as History of Engagement? The French Scholarship – CORRIGENDUM.Massimo Asta - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (2):660-660.
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  3.  1
    Claudia Jones, International Thinker.Sarah Dunstan & Patricia Owens - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (2):551-574.
    This article analyses the early international thought of Trinidad-born Marxist journalist Claudia Jones. We focus on a neglected aspect of Jones's intellectual production in the United States: her interrogation of geopolitics in her Weekly Review articles in the early 1940s. We situate Jones in relation to the contemporary popularization of geopolitical thought in this period, reading her alongside another neglected figure in histories of international thought, the African American geopolitical scholar and diplomatic historian Merze Tate. Jones read together the geopolitical, (...)
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  4.  6
    Black Women's Internationalism: A New Frontier in Intellectual History.Ashley D. Farmer - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (2):625-637.
    Published in Paris in 1928 under the leadership of Guadeloupean Maurice Satineau, the newspaper La dépêche africaine featured a mélange of African diasporic contributors from across the French colonies. Chief among them were the Afro-Martinican intellectuals and sisters Jane and Paulette Nardal. It was here that Jane Nardal published her now famous essay “Internationalisme noir,” introducing the idea of “black internationalism” into popular parlance. Nardal documented a new understanding of blackness and collectivity amid post-World War I globalization. Just as wartime (...)
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  5.  2
    Imperial Diversity, Fractured Sovereignty, and Legal Universals: Hans Kelsen and Eugen Ehrlich in Their Habsburg Context.Franz Leander Fillafer - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (2):421-443.
    This essay places Eugen Ehrlich and Hans Kelsen afresh in their common context, the late Habsburg Empire. It reframes Ehrlich's legal sociology and Kelsen's pure theory of law as co-original and connected responses to the problem of legal universals under conditions of fractured sovereignty and imperial diversity. At first glance, Kelsen and Ehrlich seem antipodes, an impression apparently confirmed by their prickly exchange in the 1910s: while Kelsen made universality reside in the formal features and sequences of imputation that held (...)
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  6.  5
    Reading Heidegger Against the Grain: Hans Jonas on Existentialism, Gnosticism, and Modern Science.Daniel M. Herskowitz - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (2):527-550.
    This article argues that the link Hans Jonas drew between Martin Heidegger's philosophy and Gnosticism cannot be properly understood without taking into consideration his philosophical interpretation of modern science. It claims that Jonas saw Heideggerian existentialism not as a modern instantiation of Gnosticism but as a specific experiential reaction to the new cosmological outlook that emerged from the seventeenth-century scientific revolution, which negated the conceptual world that made Gnosticism possible. Jonas's interpretation is “against the grain”: by claiming that Heidegger's thought (...)
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  7.  2
    Creation, Evolution, and “The New Cosmic Philosophy”: William Todd Martin's Critique of Herbert Spencer.Andrew R. Holmes & David N. Livingstone - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (2):375-396.
    This article explores the religious response of one neglected writer to the evolutionary philosophy of Herbert Spencer. William Todd Martin was a minister of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland and in 1887 published The Evolution Hypothesis: A Criticism of the New Cosmic Philosophy. The work demonstrates the essentially contested nature of “evolution” and “creation” by showing how a self-confessed creationist could affirm an evolutionary understanding of the natural world and species transformation. Martin's approach reflected a transatlantic Presbyterian worldview that saw (...)
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  8.  5
    On the Decolonial Beginnings of Edward Said.Maurice M. Labelle Jr - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (2):600-624.
    This essay historicizes the formation of Edward Said's critique of imperial culture before the publication of Orientalism and examines how it framed the decolonial approach that made him world-renowned. Deeply influenced by the writings of Martinique-born psychiatrist and Algerian revolutionary Frantz Fanon, an Arab tradition of anti-orientalism, existentialist thought, and the Palestinian national movement, the New York-based intellectual reconceptualized the idea of decolonization in the late 1960s in a way that shifted contemporary thinking on social relationships between racial difference and (...)
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  9.  4
    “Something Apart, Yet an Integral Part”: Duke Ellington's Harlem and the Nexus of Race and Nation.Daniel Matlin - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (2):499-526.
    Harlem loomed large in the imagination of Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington, one of the twentieth century's most significant composers and an important theorist of the condition of being black and American. This article provides insights into Ellington's social thought by foregrounding his evocations of Harlem and his efforts to interpolate that neighborhood into the physical, cultural, and imaginative spaces of US national life. In doing so, it also situates Ellington's ideas in relation to the competing intellectual currents of the Harlem (...)
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  10.  2
    Enlightenment and Erudition: Writing Cultural History at the Académie des Inscriptions.Anton M. Matytsin - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (2):323-348.
    This article explores continuities between the antiquarian erudition of humanist historians and Enlightenment philosophical histories, showing that supposedly revolutionary developments in eighteenth-century historiography emerged from an older scholarly tradition. It focuses on the research of the Royal Academy of Inscriptions and Letters, a learned society in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century France that went from serving as a propaganda tool for promoting King Louis XIV's absolutist regime to becoming the first modern historical research institute and a cradle of the Enlightenment. The article (...)
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  11.  5
    Hayek's Spiritual Science.Jerry O'Shea - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (2):473-498.
    This article argues that Hayek's thought had a consistent epistemological core that he developed with the aim of undermining prevailing positivism and replacing it with a metaphysical and spiritualistic philosophy of science. This becomes clear when an intellectual-historical method is used to elucidate Hayek's psychological and methodological works. We see that the approaches and arguments he found most convincing were those of nineteenth-century neo-Kantianisms, Gestalt psychology, vitalism, phenomenology, and theological mathematician Georg Cantor. Hayek thought his spiritual science superior because it (...)
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  12.  3
    Federalism, Representation, and Direct Democracy in 1920s India.Tejas Parasher - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (2):444-472.
    This article reconstructs an overlooked tradition of direct democracy within early twentieth-century Indian political thought. It focuses on four political thinkers—Radhakumud Mookerji, Brajendranath Seal, Radhakamal Mukerjee, and Beni Prasad —all of whom were central figures in a genre of federalist historiography of premodern Indian politics which emerged in the 1910s. The article interprets these thinkers as critics of the Indian nationalist movement's embrace of electoral government in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Through a contextual reading of their major (...)
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  13.  4
    The Rise and Fall of Marxist Perspectives: Eugene Genovese and the Fight for Hegemony in Radical American Historiography.Gabriel Raeburn - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (2):575-599.
    In the spring of 1978, radical historians launched the academic journal Marxist Perspectives. Edited by the celebrated Marxist historian Eugene Genovese, the journal comprised one of the strongest collectives of radical historians that American academia has ever seen. However, Marxist Perspectives collapsed after only two years in print. This article charts the journal's origins and its premature demise as a lens to explore Genovese's intellectual career and examine how competing radical factions attempted to define the field. In analyzing how both (...)
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  14.  1
    The Spatiality of Politics: Cesare Battisti's Regional and International Thought, 1900–1916.Or Rosenboim - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (2):397-420.
    This article concerns the conceptualization of political spaces in early twentieth-century European political thought. The main figure is the Italian geographer and political thinker Cesare Battisti. Drawing on his geographical knowledge of his native region of Trentino, then in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Battisti envisioned an alternative political order in Central Europe. In a series of geographical surveys and political essays, he described his idea of the region as a meaningful political space, that could become an alternative to both empire and (...)
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  15.  4
    From Pennsylvania to Transylvania: August Ludwig Schlözer and the Decentering of Enlightenment.Benedek M. Varga - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (2):349-374.
    This article analyzes the historical and political thinking of the eighteenth-century German historian August Ludwig Schlözer, in the context of the American War of Independence and the French Revolution. The article argues that Schlözer's disillusionment with these transformative events led him to identify the German settlers in medieval Transylvania as agents of a better Enlightenment. In doing so, Schlözer constructed the history of the Transylvanian German colony as an antithesis to American colonial endeavors, while redefining the frameworks and history of (...)
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  16.  1
    The Future of Europe's Democratic Way of Life.Peter J. Verovšek - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (2):638-648.
    In 2016 the democratic world experienced two major shocks. Although support for illiberal nationalism has been on the rise for at least a decade, the events of that year, starting with the narrow victory of the Leave campaign in the United Kingdom's 23 June referendum on its membership in the European Union, followed less than six months later by Donald J. Trump's election as president of the United States on 8 November, constituted a clear break. In contrast to the postwar (...)
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  17.  2
    An Isthmus of Modern Thought: Islam and Psychoanalysis in North Africa and the Middle East.Benjamin Claude Brower - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (1):297-308.
    On three occasions the Qur'an mentions what it calls barzakh, an enigmatic word that denotes a partition such as that found between fresh and sea water, good and evil, faith and knowledge, even this world and the next. Nimble thinkers have made good use of the in-betweenness of barzakh. Its divisions make possible distinctions and provide form. And yet, just as it divides, the barzakh also connects. In fact, the word is often rendered in English as “isthmus,” which shows up (...)
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  18.  13
    How Did the American Revolution Relate to the French? Richard Price, the Age of Revolutions, and the Enlightenment.J. C. D. Clark - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (1):105-127.
    Richard Price is important in present-day historiography chiefly for the interpretation of two great revolutions, the American and the French. Recent studies have depicted him as insightfully forward-looking, a well-informed cosmopolitan, his thought providing an interpretive key to the Age of Revolutions, and so as a landmark figure of a singular Enlightenment. They have paid insufficient attention to his identity as a theologian, a Welsh-born Nonconformist minister of more defined outlook, spending his life in England and campaigning above all for (...)
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  19.  7
    The Downfall of All Slavish Hierarchies: Richard Price on Emancipation, Improvement, and Republican Utopia.Yiftah Elazar - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (1):81-104.
    Scholars have been paying increasing attention to the republican theory of liberty developed by the eighteenth-century British radical Richard Price. This article studies his narrative of a revolution of liberty, which consists in the downfall of oppressive powers, the establishment of republican institutions, and the introduction of a utopian age. In distinction from work that has focused on the millennial aspects of Price's narrative of emancipation, I highlight its political contexts and functions, situating its early development in utopian speculations about (...)
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  20.  2
    A Rankean Moment in Japan: The Persona of the Historian and the Globalization of the Discipline, C.1900.Michael Facius - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (1):217-240.
    This article attends to a formative moment in the history of Japanese historiography around 1900, when many Japanese historians began to identify with the eminent German historian Leopold von Ranke—curiously, however, without a substantial preceding engagement with his work. The article employs the concept of the “scholarly persona” to explore the views of influential Japanese historians on the significance of Leopold von Ranke as an embodiment of scholarly virtues. Contrasting Ranke's image in Japan with that prevalent among German and European (...)
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  21.  2
    Philological Observation.Christian Flow - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (1):187-216.
    Scholars have shown that historicizing studies of sight can shed light on everything from art history to statecraft to scientific inquiry. But the disciplined eye of the scholar of language—the philological observer—has received little attention, an omission particularly worthy of notice given recent interest in how the history of humanities might be incorporated into the history of science more broadly. This article contributes to a treatment of philological observation in the nineteenth century. Focusing particularly on the career of the Munich (...)
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  22.  7
    “Popular Sovereignty That I Deny”: Benjamin Constant on Public Opinion, Political Legitimacy and Constitution Making.Arthur Ghins - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (1):128-158.
    According to a dominant narrative, the concept of popular sovereignty was joined to the notion of public opinion during the French Revolution to form the blueprint of a liberal constitutional state. This article shows how, after the Revolution, Benjamin Constant, who is now recognized as a founding figure of “liberalism,” used public opinion as a substitute for popular sovereignty to theorize political legitimacy and constitution making. I show why and when Constant discussed popular sovereignty, namely to dismiss it as an (...)
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  23. Rethinking the Rites Controversy: Kilian Stumpf's Acta Pekinensia and the Historical Dimensions of a Religious Quarrel.Gianamar Giovannetti-Singh - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (1):29-53.
    The Chinese rites controversy is typically characterized as a religious quarrel between different Catholic orders over whether it was permissible for Chinese converts to observe traditional rites and use the terms tian and shangdi to refer to the Christian God. As such, it is often argued that the conflict was shaped predominantly by the divergent theological attitudes between the rites-supporting Jesuits and their anti-rites opponents towards “accommodation.” By examining the Jesuit missionary Kilian Stumpf's Acta Pekinensia—a detailed chronicle of the papal (...)
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  24.  4
    The Early Jewish Reception of Kantian Philosophy.Ian Hunter - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (1):159-186.
    Current discussions of the early Jewish reception of Kantian philosophy are dominated by two major approaches. According to the first, this reception was governed by a universal Enlightenment rationalism that was present in Judaism no less than in Kantian philosophy. According to the second, it was the fact that Kantianism contained a latent Judaic kabbalistic philosophy that made it attractive to Jewish intellectuals. This paper departs from both approaches by showing that when Jewish intellectuals encountered Kantianism they found neither a (...)
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  25.  5
    Norman Mailer and American Totalitarianism in the 1960s.Sophie Joscelyne - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (1):241-267.
    This article investigates Norman Mailer's appropriation and Americanization of the concept of totalitarianism as an internal critique of US society and culture in the 1960s. Dominant understandings of totalitarianism from the 1930s to the 1950s focused on external threats and were wedded to notions of pervasive state control of all aspects of life. Mailer's crucial intervention offered an alternative theory which viewed totalitarianism as an internal threat to the United States and de-emphasized the centrality of the state. His theory of (...)
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  26.  6
    A Factory Afield: Capitalism and Empire in John Locke's Political Economy.Lucas G. Pinheiro - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (1):1-28.
    Since the 1950s, interpreters of John Locke have debated whether his ideas about political economy figured among the intellectual sources of capitalist development. While some have labeled Locke a mercantile or agrarian “capitalist thinker,” others have insisted that, although a mercantilist, he was in no sense a theorist of capitalism. By reconstructing the relationship between Locke's ideas and the capitalist society of his day, this article challenges the prevailing terms through which commentators have traditionally interpreted his political economy and its (...)
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  27. Whatever Happened to the Social in American Social Thought? Part 2.Dorothy Ross - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (1):268-296.
    The liberal social thought of the long 1950s is best seen as an attempt to combat the threat that the United States, as a modern mass society, could succumb to totalitarianism. Widely discussed texts like Escape from Freedom, The Vital Center, The Lonely Crowd, and The Origins of Totalitarianism announced the threat. Academic and theoretical studies worked to provide social supports for now weakened individuals or to find behavioral evidence that Americans still functioned as liberal democrats, but they did so (...)
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  28.  3
    State Violence, Justice, And The Suffering Of Others.Sandrine Sanos - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (1):309-321.
    In 1955, Alain Resnais's now canonical documentary, Nuit et Brouillard ended with an ominous question, asking “who, among us, is keeping watch from this strange watchtower [of the ruins of Auschwitz] to warn of the arrival of our new executioners” who might bring about the return of the “concentrationary plague?” One man had already made it his mission to do so: the French writer and former political deportee David Rousset. Rousset had shaken the French world of letters and politics with (...)
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  29.  1
    Natural Law and the Chair of Ethics in the University of Naples, 1703–1769.Felix Waldmann - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (1):54-80.
    This articles focuses on a significant change to the curriculum in “ethics” in the University of Naples, superintended by Celestino Galiani, the rector of the university, and Antonio Genovesi, Galiani's protégé and the university's professor of ethics. The article contends that Galiani's and Genovesi's sympathies lay with the form of “modern natural law” pioneered by Hugo Grotius and his followers in Northern Europe. The transformation of curricular ethics in Protestant contexts had stemmed from an anxiety about its relevance in the (...)
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