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  1.  7
    The Enduring Fortress: The Influence of Bruno Bettelheim in the Politics of Autism in France.Jonathyne Briggs - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (4):1163-1191.
    This article examines how the work of Bruno Bettelheim remained influential in debates concerning the meaning of autism as well as its treatment in France well after it was marginalized in the United States. The persistence of Bettelheim's work among French audiences speaks to how the French understanding of autism diverged from its conception in the United States thanks to the social and cultural interest in psychoanalysis in French society and the perceived effectiveness of his form of treatment. The conflation (...)
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  2.  2
    Scottish Medical Ethnography: Colonial Travel, Stadial Theory and the Natural History of Race, C.1770–1805.Bruce Buchan - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (4):919-949.
    This paper will present a comparative analysis of the ethnographic writings of three colonial travellers trained in medicine at the University of Edinburgh: William Anderson, Archibald Menzies and Robert Brown. Each travelled widely beyond Scotland, enabling them to make a series of observations of non-European peoples in a wide variety of colonial contexts. William Anderson, Archibald Menzies and Robert Brown in particular travelled extensively in the Pacific with James Cook on his second and third voyages, with George Vancouver and with (...)
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  3.  20
    “Always Mixed Together”: Notation, Language, and the Pedagogy of Frege's Begriffsschrift.David E. Dunning - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (4):1099-1131.
    Gottlob Frege is considered a founder of analytic philosophy and mathematical logic, but the traditions that claim Frege as a forebear never embraced his Begriffsschrift, or “conceptual notation”—the invention he considered his most important accomplishment. Frege believed that his notation rendered logic visually observable. Rejecting the linearity of written language, he claimed Begriffsschrift exhibited a structure endogenous to logic itself. But Frege struggled to convince others to use his notation, as his frustrated pedagogical efforts at the University of Jena illustrate. (...)
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  4.  11
    Reappraising News From Nowhere: William Morris, J. S. Mill and Fabian Essays.Seamus Flaherty - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (4):951-980.
    This article examines News from Nowhere, William Morris's late nineteenth-century utopian romance. It seeks, first, to establish John Stuart Mill as a crucial influence on the text. It argues that, in News from Nowhere, Morris engaged extensively with Mill's mid-century essay On Liberty. It shows how Morris dramatized Mill's “harm principle”; how he challenged the notion that custom must necessarily be antithetical to the “spirit of liberty”; and how he enacted Mill's stricture that “if opponents of all important truths do (...)
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  5.  2
    Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre: French Intellectuals “Embedded in the World”.Emma Kuby - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (4):1225-1239.
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  6. Rethinking the ‘Chicago Smith’ Problem: Adam Smith and the Chicago School, 1929-1980 – Corrigendum.Glory Liu - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (4):1241-1241.
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  7.  16
    Rethinking the “Chicago Smith” Problem: Adam Smith and the Chicago School, 1929–1980.Glory M. Liu - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (4):1041-1068.
    This article traces the origins and evolution of a popular interpretation of Adam Smith as a “Chicago-style” economist, and it challenges the idea that the “Chicago Smith” is simply a misinterpretation of Smith's ideas. To that end, it reexamines the role that the Chicago school of economics played in developing and propounding a distinct vision of Adam Smith, not only within the profession of economics, but also for the broader American public in the twentieth century. I argue that the readings, (...)
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  8.  11
    Peter Drucker's Protestant Ethic: Between European Humanism and American Management.Ian F. Mcneely - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (4):1069-1097.
    Peter Drucker is celebrated as perhaps the greatest management guru, and one of the greatest futurists, of the twentieth century, but he has rarely been taken seriously as an intellectual. Raised in Vienna among a cohort of émigré academics that included Schumpeter, Hayek, and von Mises, among others, Drucker was both deeply learned and incredibly prolific. This essay seeks to rehabilitate Drucker as a humanistic social thinker, reinterpreting his earliest writings in German, his two major treatises on totalitarianism and the (...)
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  9.  2
    Raymond Williams's “Structure of Feeling” and the Problem of Democratic Values in Britain, 1938–1961.Stuart Middleton - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (4):1133-1161.
    This article traces a history of the literary critic and theorist Raymond Williams’s idea of the “structure of feeling”, the formation of which is situated within debates about the place of artistic and moral values in democratic politics during the 1940s and 1950s. It demonstrates that the “structure of feeling” was intended to circumvent an equation of collective normative legislation with totalitarianism in the early cultural Cold War, by conceiving the definition of values as a process upon which all individuals (...)
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  10.  10
    Wrestling with the Shadow: The Panlogism Controversy in Hegel's French Reception.Pietro Terzi - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (4):981-1008.
    This article widens the scope of the history of Hegel's reception in turn-of-the-century French philosophy by thematizing an often neglected moment, namely the years 1897 to 1927. Before the so-called “Hegel renaissance,” in fact, the Hegelian dialectics was generally understood as a “panlogist” doctrine aimed at dissolving the concrete individual in the abstract dimension of the concept or in the all-encompassing realm of Absolute Spirit. However, even at the beginning of the century, attempts were made to provide a more positive (...)
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  11.  12
    Genealogies of Baʿthism: Michel ʿaflaq Between Personalism and Arabic Nationalism.Max Weiss - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (4):1193-1224.
    This paper reframes the intellectual genealogy of Baʿthism in modern Syria through a close reading of the writings of one of its founding figures, Michel ʿAflaq. Rereading ʿAflaq's most important texts is part of a broader reconsideration of the intellectual history of modern Syria between nationalism and liberalism, revolution and reaction. While recognizing the traces of nineteenth-century German idealist philosophy and Romantic nationalism in ʿAflaq's thought, this piece complicates the conventional understanding of his work by showing a striking resemblance with (...)
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  12.  5
    British Comtism and Modernist Design.Matthew Wilson - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (4):1009-1040.
    Scholars of political thought, sociology, and the arts have yet to fully explore the impact of positivism on modernist design theory and practice. This paper offers an intellectual history of the works of three generations of positivist sociologists who built on each other's works. They are Auguste Comte and Richard Congreve, Frederic Harrison and Charles Booth, and Patrick Geddes and Victor Branford. These actors developed different types of sociological survey, established a network of urban interventions, and proposed a series of (...)
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  13.  10
    The Romantic Socialist Origins of Humanitarianism.Naomi J. Andrews - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (3):737-768.
    “Humanitarian” came into use in French contemporaneously with the emergence of romantic socialism, and in the context of the rebuilding of post-revolutionary French society and its overseas empire beginning in the 1830s. This article excavates this early idea of humanitarianism, documenting an alternative genealogy for the term and its significance that has been overlooked by scholars of both socialism and humanitarianism. This humanitarianism identified a collective humanity as the source of its own salvation, rather than an external, well-meaning benefactor. Unlike (...)
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  14.  13
    The Subject of Sovereignty: Law, Politics and Moral Reasoning in Hugo Grotius.Annabel Brett - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (3):619-645.
    Hugo Grotius’s account of sovereign power in De iure belli ac pacis occupies a contested place in recent genealogies of modern sovereignty. This article takes a fresh approach by arguing that Grotius’s legal arguments do not do their work alone. They function within a broader horizon of what he calls “morals,” a field of reasoning that has debts to scholastic moral theology and Aristotelian moral science. Grotius's conception of sovereignty represents a modulation between law and “morals,” which allows him both (...)
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  15.  10
    From Nostalgia to Utopia: A Genealogy of French Conceptions of Supranationality.Hugo Canihac - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (3):707-736.
    This essay investigates the intellectual history of one of the purportedly most “revolutionary” concepts of post-1945 international thought—the concept of supranationality. While the literature has generally analyzed the concept as a direct continuation of progressive cosmopolitan ideas, or, to the contrary, as a political watchword formulated after 1945 to promote the European project, this essay highlights other, more ambiguous origins for the concept. It retraces the early uses of the concept in French debates. It argues that the irruption of supranationality (...)
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  16.  12
    Spinoza Between French Libertines and Dutch Cartesians: The 1673 Utrecht Visit.Albert Gootjes - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (3):591-617.
    In the summer of 1673, in what Koenraad O. Meinsma once qualified as “one of the most inexplicable events in Spinoza's life,” the philosopher left his residence in The Hague to travel to Utrecht and stayed there for some three weeks. This event has garnered much interest, for two main reasons. In the first place, it is agreed that something must have induced the rather homebound Spinoza to undertake the journey, especially since Utrecht was occupied at the time by the (...)
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  17.  1
    The Global South, Christianity, and Secularization: Insider and Outsider Perspectives.David A. Hollinger - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (3):889-901.
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  18.  2
    Power and Pluralism: American Protestantism and the American Century.Daniel G. Hummel - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (3):903-915.
    The study of US foreign relations has been in a protracted “religious turn” for at least a decade. One of the most prominent statements of the turn was Andrew Preston's article in Diplomatic History from 2006, “Bridging the Gap between the Sacred and the Secular in the History of American Foreign Relations.” Preston, a trained diplomatic historian who made an indelible contribution to the turn with his later Sword of Spirit, Shield of Strength: Religion in American War and Diplomacy, called (...)
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  19.  7
    The “Moral Basis” of Reconstruction? Humanitarianism, Intellectual Relief and the League of Nations, 1918–1925.Tomás Irish - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (3):769-800.
    This article analyses the post-First World War emergence of intellectual relief. This is defined here as aid given to intellectuals and scholarly institutions. Relief included the provision of food and medicines to individuals as well as the supply of relevant scholarly literature and laboratory equipment to academic institutions. After 1918, significant humanitarian interventions targeted Central and Eastern Europe, which had been ravaged by war and its myriad consequences. The article argues that intellectual relief, while frequently using the language of the (...)
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  20.  10
    Brazilian Race Relations, French Social Scientists, and African Decolonization: A Transatlantic History of the Idea of Miscegenation.Ian Merkel - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (3):801-832.
    This article analyzes how debates concerning Brazilian race relations, miscegenation, and racial democracy unfolded in France in the 1950s. During those years, Gilberto Freyre and those critical of him emerged in French social scientific discourse, offering distinct visions concerning race, culture, and the possibility of harmonious coexistence in a world structured by racial, social, and colonial inequalities. Certain French social scientists such as Lucien Febvre and Fernand Braudel embraced Freyre's vision as a possible source for racial and cultural mixing, whereas (...)
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  21.  12
    From Polity to Exchange: The Fate of Democracy in the Changing Fields of Early American Historiography.Johann N. Neem - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (3):867-888.
    Gordon Wood stoked a strong response from his fellow early American historians in 2015 when, in the pages of theWeekly Standard, he accused the Omohundro Institute of Early American History, publishers of the prestigiousWilliam and Mary Quarterly, of abandoning interest in the development of the United States. “A new generation of historians is no longer interested in how the United States came to be,” Wood argued. “That kind of narrative history of the nation, they say, is not only inherently triumphalist (...)
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  22.  7
    Representation and the Fall.Eric Nelson - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (3):647-676.
    This article makes the case that the early modern debate over political representation was deeply intertwined with a theological debate over the Fall. The “resemblance” theory of representation adopted by English Parliamentarians was first formulated by Calvinists to make the case that Adam represented humanity, despite the fact that humanity had never authorized him to act in their name. The Royalist rejoinder, which treated authorization as a necessary and sufficient condition of representation, began life instead as a Pelagian response to (...)
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  23.  13
    Confessional Modernity: Nicola Spedalieri, the Catholic Church and the French Revolution, C.1775–1800.Glauco Schettini - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (3):677-705.
    This article reconsiders the Catholic reaction to the French Revolution, focusing on Nicola Spedalieri's On the Rights of Man and on the debate that its publication sparked in Italy and beyond. The outbreak of the Revolution and the polarization of public opinion between the supporters of the new regime and its relentless opponents convinced Spedalieri, a well-reputed Catholic theologian, of the need to find a via media between these two extremes. Assuming the re-Christianization of the postrevolutionary world as his goal, (...)
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  24.  20
    American Divide: The Making of “Continental” Philosophy.Jonathan Strassfeld - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (3):833-866.
    The story of Western philosophy in the late twentieth century is, first and foremost, a tale of the discipline's division into two distinct discourses—analytic and Continental philosophy. This article argues that institutional dynamics of American higher education played a decisive role in the creation of this divide. Through quantitative analysis of the hiring and promotion of philosophers, it demonstrates how hierarchies and informal academic networks established boundaries for mainstream American philosophy that excluded modern European thought. Following the end of World (...)
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  25.  2
    American Divide: The Making of “Continental” Philosophy – Corrigendum.Jonathan Strassfeld - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (3):917-917.
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  26.  4
    Sovereignty as a Motor of Global Conceptual Travel: Sanskritic Equivalents of “Law” in Bengali Discursive Production.Milinda Banerjee - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):487-506.
    How may one imagine the global travel of legal concepts, thinking through models of diffusion and translation, as well as through obstruction, negation, and dialectical transfiguration? This article offers some reflections by interrogating discourses produced by three celebrated Bengalis: the nationalist littérateur Bankimchandra Chattopadhyay, the Rajavamshi “lower-caste” peasant leader Panchanan Barma, and the international jurist Radhabinod Pal. These actors evidently took part in projects of vernacularizing legal–political frameworks of state sovereignty. They produced ideas of nexus between sovereignty, law, and “divine” (...)
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  27.  3
    Forum: Law, Empire, and Global Intellectual History: An Introduction.Milinda Banerjee & Kerstin von Lingen - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):467-470.
    In recent years, there has been a deepening convergence between scholarship on global intellectual history and on legal history. To take just one example, a recent book on international law, by Arnulf Becker Lorca, carries “global intellectual history” in its subtitle—a stance related to the author's emphasis on the constitutive role in the field of non-European legal actors. A sustained reflection on the convergence between legal studies and global intellectual history, however, still remains a desideratum, at least in the sense (...)
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  28.  6
    Haunted: On the New Arabic Translation of Sartre's Anti-Semite and Jew.Yoav di-Capua - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):443-466.
    Two years ago, without any apparent explanation, a little-known Egyptian scholar translated Jean-Paul Sartre's Anti-Semite and Jew into Arabic. Widely acknowledged as an experimental and highly influential theory of anti-Semitism in the 1960s, Sartre's text had already had a profound, yet indirect, influence on an entire class of left-wing Arab intellectuals who used it in order to figure out their relationship with the colonizer; that is, with their Otherness. Though these intellectuals read Anti-Semite and Jew in French, it still remained (...)
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  29.  6
    Charles Rollin and Universal History in America.Mark W. Graham - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):325-355.
    Whoever has travelled in the New England States will remember, in some cool village, the large farmhouse, with its clean-swept grassy yard … In the family “keeping-room,” as it is termed, he will remember the staid, respectable old bookcase, with its glass doors, where Rollin's History, Milton's Paradise Lost, Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, and Scott's Family Bible, stand side by side in decorous order, with multitudes of other books, equally solemn and respectable.Harriet Beecher Stowe,Uncle Tom's Cabin, 226.
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  30.  7
    “The Brides of Deconstruction and Criticism” and the Transformation of Feminism in the North American Academy.Gregory Jones-Katz - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):413-442.
    “The Brides of Deconstruction and Criticism,” an informal group of feminist literary critics active at Yale University during the 1970s, were inspired by second-wave feminist curriculum, activities, and thought, as well as by the politics of the women's and gay liberation movements, in their effort to intervene into patterns of female effacement and marginalization. By the early 1980s, while helping direct deconstructive reading away from the self-subversiveness of French and English prose and poetry, the Brides made groundbreaking contributions to—and in (...)
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  31.  3
    Rewording the Past: The Postwar Publication of a 1938 Lecture by Martin Heidegger - Corrigendum.Sidonie Kellerer - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):589-589.
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  32.  10
    Liberalism, Cultural Particularism, and the Rule of Law in Modern East Asia: The Anti-Confucian Essentialisms of Chen Duxiu and Fukuzawa Yukichi Compared.Kiri Paramore - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):527-542.
    How and why are universalist modes of political thought transformed into culturally essentialist and exclusionary practices of governance and law? This article considers this question by analyzing the interaction between Confucianism and liberalism in East Asia. It argues that liberalism, particularly as it was used in attacking Confucianism, was instrumental in embedding ideas of cultural particularism and cultural essentialism in the emergence of modern political thought and law in both China and Japan. Both Confucianism and liberalism are self-imagined as universalist (...)
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  33.  6
    Navigating the Postwar Liberal Order: Autonomy, Creativity and Modernism in Socialist Yugoslavia, 1949–1953.James M. Robertson - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):385-412.
    Between the years 1949 and 1953 the leaders of the Federative People's Republic of Yugoslavia embarked on a series of radical social and economic reforms that restructured state–society relations in line with a decentralized, participatory model of socialism. “Self-management socialism,” as this system became known, served to harmonize local revolutionary ambitions with the embedded liberalism of the postwar international order into which Yugoslavia sought to integrate. During the early reform period Yugoslav intellectuals reorganized socialist ideology around new understandings of autonomy (...)
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  34.  8
    Autonomy and Decentralization in the Global Imperial Crisis: The Russian Empire and the Soviet Union in 1905–1924.Ivan Sablin & Alexander Semyonov - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):543-560.
    This article brings the case of imperial transformation of the Russian Empire/Soviet Union into global discussions about empire, nationalism, and postimperial governance, and highlights the political and legal imaginaries that shaped this transformation, including their global and entangled character. This article argues that the legal and political discourses of decentralization, autonomism, and federalism that circulated at the time of the imperial crisis between the Revolution of 1905 and the adoption of the Soviet Constitution in 1924 contributed to the formation of (...)
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  35.  19
    Property and Political Norms: Hanafi Juristic Discourse in Agrarian Bengal.Andrew Sartori - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):471-485.
    This article explores the reception of discourses about land and property in Islamic jurisprudence in colonial Bengal. I argue that Hanafifiqhprovided a sophisticated conceptual repertoire for framing claims to property that agrarian political actors in Muslim Bengal drew upon. Yet the dominant framework for understanding property claims in postclassical jurisprudence was ill-fitted to claims of the kind that agrarian movements in colonial Bengal were articulating. As a result, twentieth-century agrarian movements in the region spoke the language offiqh, but nonetheless inhabited (...)
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  36.  9
    Gauging the German Jewish.Daniel B. Schwartz - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):579-588.
    Few fields are as riddled with terminological indecision as “German Jewish thought.” One cannot invoke this sphere without immediately bumping up against essential questions of definition. Should membership within its bounds be reserved for those who wrote, primarily, as Jews for Jews, even if in a non-Jewish language? Or should its borders be expanded substantially to include Jewish contributions to secular German thought—or, perhaps more aptly put, secular thought in German, in order not to exclude the vast number of Central (...)
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  37.  14
    Credible Witnessing: A. R. Wallace, Spiritualism, and a “New Branch of Anthropology”.Efram Sera-Shriar - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):357-384.
    This paper situates Alfred Russel Wallace's spiritualist writings from his book Miracles and Modern Spiritualism against the backdrop of Victorian anthropology. It examines how he constructed his argument, and the ways in which he verified the trustworthiness of his evidence using theories and methods drawn from anthropology. Spirit investigations relied on personal testimony. Thus the key question was: who could be trusted as a credible witness? While much has been written on Wallace's inquiries into spirit phenomena, very little scholarship has (...)
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  38.  12
    Legal Flows: Contributions of Exiled Lawyers to the Concept of “Crimes Against Humanity” During the Second World War.Kerstin von Lingen - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):507-525.
    This article addresses the normative framework of the concept of “crimes against humanity” from the perspective of intellectual history, by scrutinizing legal debates of marginalized academic–juridical actors within the United Nations War Crimes Commission. Decisive for its successful implementation were two factors: the growing scale of mass violence against civilians during the Second World War, and the strong support and advocacy of “peripheral actors,” jurists forced into exile in London by the war. These jurists included representatives of smaller Allied countries (...)
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  39.  10
    Jewish Modern Law and Legalism in a Global Age: The Case of Rabbi Joseph Karo.Roni Weinstein - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (2):561-578.
    During the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, Rabbi Joseph Karo composed two major Jewish codes of law: the Beit Yosef, and its abridged version, Sulchan ‘Aruch. Though several centuries of legal discussion and scholarship have passed since their publication, these double codes of law were never superseded. This codification project defined the axial place of law in Jewish tradition. I argue that it responded to changes in legal processes and the enforcement of law that simultaneously transformed early modern Europe (...)
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  40.  1
    How England Fell Off the Map of Voltaire's Enlightenment.Dan Edelstein & Biliana Kassabova - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (1):29-53.
    Voltaire'sLetters Concerning the English Nation have left the indelible impression that the Frenchphilosophewas fundamentally marked by his exposure to English thought in the late 1720s. On the map of his epistolary correspondence, however, England is hardly to be found. What are we to make of this discrepancy? In this article, we demonstrate that the missing letters to England are unlikely to be the result of a data glitch, but rather reflect a lack of interest in contemporary English matters. The only (...)
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  41.  11
    John Locke and the Politics of Monetary Depoliticization.Stefan Eich - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (1):1-28.
    During the Coinage Crisis of 1695, John Locke successfully advocated a full recoinage without devaluation by insisting on silver money's “intrinsick value.” The Great Recoinage has ever since been seen as a crucial step toward the Financial Revolution and it was long regarded as Locke's most consequential achievement. This article places Locke's intervention in the context of the postrevolutionary English state at war and reads his monetary pamphlets as an integral, if largely neglected, part of his political philosophy. Instead of (...)
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  42.  6
    History, Philosophy, and the Imagination in Enlightenment Studies.Anthony J. la Vopa - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (1):279-302.
    “The Enlightenment,” Anthony Pagden writes in the conclusion toThe Enlightenment: And Why It Still Matters, “quite simply created the modern world.”1It would have been more prudent to say that the Enlightenment created “the conditions of possibility” of modernity; or, more prudent still, that it was critical to forming certain values and institutions that we consider modern. Precisely because the latter way of putting it is so anemic, it is one of the rare few statements that would be acceptable across the (...)
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  43.  2
    Jean-Paul Sartre the European.Hugh Mcdonnell - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (1):147-177.
    Jean-Paul Sartre's 1961 famous and infamous preface to Frantz Fanon'sThe Wretched of the Earthhas engendered the common impression of Sartre as an intellectual who was particularly hostile to Europe. In revising this perception, this article reviews Sartre's engagement with the idea of Europe over many decades. This certainly included critique, but also nuanced and positive considerations of what Europe and being European meant. This thinking about Europe is to be situated, first, in terms of Sartre's evolving philosophical project to reconcile (...)
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  44.  13
    Soviet Policy Sciences and Earth System Governmentality.Eglė Rindzevičiūtė - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (1):179-208.
    This article introduces non-Western policy sciences into the burgeoning field of the intellectual history of Earth system governmentality, a field that studies the ideas, institutions and material systems that enable action at the global scale. It outlines the rise of debates on the idea of the governability of the global biosphere in late Soviet Russia, focusing particularly on the extension of Vladimir Vernadskii's famous theory of the biosphere and its governance into computer modeling and systems analysis. As a result, a (...)
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  45.  1
    Introduction: Texts, Contexts, and the History of Psychoanalysis: Forum on Dagmar Herzog,Cold War Freud: Psychoanalysis in an Age of Catastrophe.Camille Robcis - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (1):209-213.
    The title of Dagmar Herzog's exciting new book,Cold War Freud: Psychoanalysis in an Age of Catastrophes, immediately raises a series of questions. If we understand the Cold War as a particular moment in history ranging from the 1940s to the 1980s, but also as a time of intense politicization, we might wonder about the juxtaposition of “Cold War” and “Freud”—the juxtaposition of history and politics with psychoanalysis. When Freud invented psychoanalysis at the end of the nineteenth century, his primary motivation (...)
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  46.  7
    Political Atheism: The Secularization and Liberalization of American Public Life.David Sehat - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (1):249-277.
    The United States is a deeply Christian country, but over the last sixty years American public culture has become increasingly detached from religious concerns. Christian activists, when not speaking within the Republican Party, have had to assert their privilege in a way that they never had to do in the past. In spite of their efforts, the role of Christianity in culture and politics has seen a more or less continuous decline. This essay examines how and why that process occurred. (...)
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    The New Liberal Vision of C. F. G. Masterman: Religion, Politics and Literature in Early Twentieth-Century Britain.Julia Stapleton - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (1):85-115.
    This article explores the political thought of C. F. G. Masterman, a leading figure in the movement of New Liberalism in Britain at the beginning of the twentieth century. The article emphasizes the distinctive color his Christian beliefs and Anglican loyalties lent to his progressive Liberal ideals; this adds a new dimension to the existing historiography of the New Liberalism, which, until recently, has neglected the religious influences on its development. The article further underlines Masterman's concern to harness the cause (...)
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    Gramsci's Revolutions: Passive and Permanent.Peter D. Thomas - 2020 - Modern Intellectual History 17 (1):117-146.
    Antonio Gramsci's notion of “passive revolution” has often been understood as a distinctive historical narrative, political concept, or theory of state formation. This article proposes to consider it instead as a “heuristic formula” within the “lexical architecture” of thePrison Notebooks. Based upon a diachronic and contextualist analysis of the usage of the formula, I argue that Gramsci's research on passive revolution emerged as a critical element within the development of his own distinctive conception of the “sublation” and “actualization” of the (...)
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