Year:

  1.  3
    Teaching Forgetfulness: How a Greek Statue Has Led Us Back Into the Cave.Michael Arvanitopoulos - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (3):70.
    A possible escape from the neoliberal appreciation of “education” and the selling from faculty providers to student consumers of a commodity, such as a credential or a set of workplace skills serving efficiency and productivity, may come perhaps from an alternative understanding of the concept, one that now hearkens to the ringing of a truth preserved in its Latin etymology. Ex-duco can be seen as an allusion pointing to the didactic of Plato’s cave metaphor, where understanding unchains people from the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  3
    Aesthetic Interpretation and Construction of an Illusionist Painting in the Qing Dynasty: A Semiotic Approach to Learning.Manuel V. Castilla - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (3):89.
    The textual character of an artwork can be explained, despite the changes of meaning that occur over time. Consciously or unconsciously, works of art typically express the historical, religious, social, environmental, and other preoccupations of their time.1 Because artwork is inevitably affected by later cultural impositions, recent interpretations of works from earlier periods cannot fully capture the way they were seen by their contemporaries. Thus, the Coliseum, which originally represented a place of public spectacles, is now primarily seen as a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  77
    Judith Butler and a Pedagogy of Dancing Resilience.Joshua M. Hall - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (3):1.
    This essay is part of a larger project in which I construct a new, historically-informed, social justice-centered philosophy of dance, centered on four central phenomenological constructs, or “Moves.” This essay in particular is about the fourth Move, “resilience.” More specifically, I explore how Judith Butler engages with the etymological aspects of this word, suggesting that resilience involves a productive form of madness and a healthy form of compulsion, respectively. I then conclude by showing how “resilience” can be used in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  2
    The Abject in Education.Cassie Lowe - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (3):17.
    Sue felt welling disgust as the first dark drops of menstrual blood struck the tile in dime-sized drops. “For God’s sake Carrie, you got your period!’ Sue cried. ‘Clean yourself up!”Within the walls of her educational institution, classmates bombard Carrie with feminine hygiene products, chanting “plug it up!” as their disgust for her rises.1 This fictional scene in Stephen King’s Carrie is cruel but is perhaps not inconceivable as something that might occur in reality. In this scene, Carrie is dehumanized, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  17
    The Puzzle of Good Bad Movies.Uku Tooming - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (3):31-46.
    There are bad movies, and there are movies that are so bad that they are good. So-called good bad movies have received a lot of attention from critics and moviegoers in recent years. Many people, including those with good taste, are willing to invest their time and resources in watching and discussing them. In this paper, I will argue that the fact that aesthetically competent consumers of cinema are engaging with good bad movies challenges an intuitive assumption according to which (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  2
    Admiration, Emulation, and the Description of Character.Sophia Vasalou - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (3):47.
    The experience of admiration has become the focus of renewed philosophical attention in recent times, singled out by many as an emotion with an important role to play in the moral life. Taken as it stands, this is a claim that invites distinctions, given the complex ways in which this emotion concept features in our ordinary experience and expressive habits. We speak of admiring a person’s integrity and selflessness, but we also speak of admiring her wit or sense of humor, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  6
    Performing Somaesthetics in Philosophy, Art, and Life. [REVIEW]Krystyna Wilkoszewska - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (3):108.
    The book Aesthetic Experience and Somaesthetics, edited by Richard Shusterman, was published as the first volume of the Brill series “Studies in Som-aesthetics.”1 It includes papers prepared on the basis of lectures delivered by the participants of the international conference that took place in Budapest in June 2014, as well as articles written by scholars who did not take part in the conference but were invited to participate in the publication. The authors come from various countries, among others from Hungary, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  5
    Knowledge and Learning in Arts Education: Neglecting Theory and Practice.Howard Cannatella - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (2):39.
    "For if there was ever an artist whose oeuvre wants to be seen carefully, whose images beg for the solitary and unhurried eye …"1The arts in education have definite limitations, but have we got our evaluation of them correct? What the arts produce, Joseph Margolis mentions, are culturally embodied objects and performances.2 This means that, in order to evaluate the arts in education properly, as Hegel expounds, we have to grasp an art's particular and singular culturally embodied object and performance (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  3
    Begetting the New: The Marrow of Originality as Discovered From the Making of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet: Part 2. Creation Demystified.Armen E. Petrosyan - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (2):94.
    To the memory of my mother ErnaShakespeare saw in the beauty and passion of young hearts "the irradiating glory of sunlight and starlight in a dark world." In contrast to Arthur Brooke, the dramatist shows not the omnipotence of merciless and inexorable fate but an inextinguishable image of "light, every form and manifestation of it: the sun, moon, stars, fire, lightning, the flash of gunpowder, and the reflected light of beauty and of love." All these are opposed to "night, darkness, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  4
    Beauty (Mei_, 美) in the _Zhuangzi and Contemporary Theories of Beauty.Peng Feng - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (2):21.
    Mei in Chinese is normally translated into English as "beauty" or "the beautiful." The nature of mei is not a central theme in Zhuangzi's philosophy; neither is it a concept of particular importance in traditional Chinese aesthetics. The core concepts of Chinese aesthetics, according to historians of Chinese aesthetics, are dao, qi, and xiang, but mei is not one of them.1 In Chinese aesthetic history, we see different points of emphasis in contrast to the prevailing concern with beauty in Western (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  3
    Developing Aesthetic Taste.David Fenner - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (2):113.
    Once a group of physicists at my university invited me to a physics colloquium. They were certain that I would get a great deal out of it. I love theoretical physics, although my preparation for understanding the "real stuff" is extremely modest. After the first ten minutes of the lecture, I realized I was in way over my head; though I understood the topic and the trajectory, I was not able to follow the path. But I stayed and continued to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  2
    Manual Drawing in Transformation: A Brief Assessment of “Design-by-Drawing” and Potentials of a Body Technique in Times of Digitalization.Gert Hasenhütl - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (2):56.
    Technical change and evolving product complexity lead to a separation of practical and theoretical processes in design and to an increased use of drawings, in particular, scale drawings.1 In contrast to handicraft evolution, the use of drawings in "design-by-drawing,"2 in particular, scaled and dimensioned drawings, separates experiences from production. Design and manufacturing follow different paths. This separation in the case of manual drawing needs to be examined. I am well aware that informal drawings differ from scale or construction drawings. If (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  5
    Art Across Cultures and Art by Appropriation.Mark Lafrenz - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (2):1.
    Perceptually indistinguishable artifacts may be artworks in some cultures but not be artworks in others, and artifacts that were not artworks in the context of their original creation can become artworks in contexts of appropriation, that is, in contexts in which they are brought under a cross-culturally appropriate concept or definition of art. A certain background of historical and cultural conditions, some of them theoretical, is necessary for something to be or to become an artwork. It is crucial to my (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  11
    Dewey, Foucault, and the Value of Horror: Transformative Learning Through Reading Horror Fiction.Lorraine K. C. Yeung - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (2):75.
    This article advances an account of the nonhedonic values of horror fiction (including film). It is motivated by cases in which consuming horror fosters what theorists of education call "transformative learning" in adult students, which is a more shocking and disturbing experience than pleasurable. I first present two cases in which Polanski's Repulsion (1968) and Browning's Freaks (1932) disrupted and modified two students' experience of madness and abnormality respectively. Then I draw on Dewey's "aesthetic experience", Foucault's "experience book" and O'Leary's (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  5
    Is It a Forgery? Ask a Semanticist.William Casement - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (1):51-68.
    The topic of art forgery draws attention in many quarters: major art fraud schemes make big news, books are written that bring forgers fame, the buyers and sellers of art look for assurance they are getting the genuine article, authentication specialists strain to spot phony items, museums present special exhibitions of forgeries, and theorists tackle the topic on occasion ranging from a postmodern perspective extolling the virtues of forgery to more traditional concerns about its ontological status. The dark side of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  2
    Begetting the New: The Marrow of Originality as Discovered From the Making of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet Part 1. Retracing the Antecedents.Armen E. Petrosyan - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (1):101-118.
    To the memory of my mother ErnaThe axis on which art creativity revolves is originality. Any genuine piece of art must be original; otherwise, it boils down to a mere replication or imitation and is of little worth. A work is thought to be the more original the newer it is. But what exactly should be new in it and to what extent for it to get sufficient ground to claim originality still remain a riddle.What is meant by the new? (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  2
    Teaching Justice Aesthetically: Dwelling in Japanese American Art and Religion.Courtney T. Goto - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (1):119-124.
    Enfolding Silence is a rare gem for exploring the aesthetic dimensions of epistemology and meaning-making through the arts in the context of historic communal injury. Author Brett Esaki invites his audience to consider how Japanese Americans have developed various art forms to cope with, resist, and transform traumatic experiences of racism, including the mass, unlawful internment of nearly 120,000 people of Japanese descent during World War II. By examining an extended ethnographic case study, educators and students can reflect on how (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  8
    Kant on Poetry and Cognition.Iris Vidmar Jovanović - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (1):1-17.
    Our engagements with poetry often leave us with a sense of having been not only aesthetically pleased and emotionally aroused but intellectually stimulated and cognitively rewarded.1 However, explicating the nature of such intellectual stimulus and accounting for poetry’s cognitive values are not easy tasks, given that poetry does not stand in the same relation to truth and knowledge as do science and philosophy. How then to account for the undeniable experience of having undergone a profound cognitive change after engaging with (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  7
    Skepticism About Modern Art.Alan Lee - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (1):35-50.
    From the time of the earliest self-conscious emergence of modern painting around 1905, there have not been widely accepted criteria by which to judge the artistic significance and value of the abstract and nonobjective styles that displaced the traditions of representational art. This circumstance has made the education of artists problematic. For the arts of literature and music, modernism was a relatively short-lived phase of innovation and experimentation that was played out in works that defied easy appreciation. The attention of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  1
    Intersecting Compositional and Transactional Theory: How Art Can Help Define Reader Response.Nina R. Schoonover - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (1):90-100.
    The writer starts with vision and ends with words. The reader, however, starts with the writer’s words and ends with vision.Reading comprehension is like an eye. It requires focus and concentration on how a mode is interpreted. Eyes are shaped by cultures; a Western norm considers it polite to hold one’s gaze and maintain eye contact when dialoguing, while other cultures find it aggressive or confrontational. Similarly, reading is culturally shaped through the lens of the reader, as interpretation is correlated (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  2
    Bearing Witness to a Knowledge of Encounter in Babette's Feast.Rebecca Sullivan - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (1):69-89.
    Who is it that can tell me who I am?The often-complex interplay between self and others characterizes educational undertakings. Considerations of how we gain knowledge involve, at least implicitly, an understanding of the relationship between self, others, and the material environment in which learning occurs. The Academy-Award-winning 1987 film Babette’s Feast, based on the 1950 short story by Isak Dine-sen, while not formally a story of education, presents through its protagonist a pedagogy that highlights learning through encounter as complementary and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  7
    From Sacrifice to Gift: Aesthetic and Moral Aspects of the Experience of Awe for the Natural Environment.Ionut Untea - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (1):18-34.
    The multiple aesthetic representations of the sacred throughout our troubled human history account for the variety of the ways the sacred has been appropriated as a regulatory moral and civilizing force by groups and large communities of peoples. Nature has always been part of the everyday life of human beings, and the natural environment has been perceived as a medium for the manifestation of the sacred and as a source of moral behavior. Because of this, humans developed a peculiar relationship (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  1
    Dewey, Foucault and the Value of Horror: Transformative Learning Through Reading Horror Fiction.Ka Chung Lorraine Yeung - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 2 (54):75-93.
    This article advances an account of the nonhedonic values of horror fiction (including film). It is motivated by cases in which consuming horror fosters what theorists of education call "transformative learning" in adult students, which is a more shocking and disturbing experience than pleasurable. I first present two cases in which Polanski's Repulsion (1968) and Browning's Freaks (1932) disrupted and modified two students' experience of madness and abnormality respectively. Then I draw on Dewey's "aesthetic experience", Foucault's "experience book" and O'Leary's (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues