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  1.  4
    Sperling, Daniel. 2019. Suicide tourism. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-882545-6.M. A. Ashby - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):177-179.
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  2.  4
    Liminality: The Not-So-New Normal?Michael A. Ashby - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):1-5.
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  3.  2
    “CRISPR for Disabilities: How to Self-Regulate” or Something?Amanda Courtright-Lim - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):151-161.
    The development of the CRISPR gene editing technique has been hyped as a technique that could fundamentally change scientific research and its clinical application. Unrecognized is the fact that it joins other technologies that have tried and failed under the same discourse of scientific hype. These technologies, like gene therapy and stem cell research, have moved quickly passed basic research into clinical application with dire consequences. Before hastily moving to clinical applications, it is necessary to consider basic research and determine (...)
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  4.  1
    Response—The Corruption of Character in Medicine.Carl Elliott - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):117-122.
    Some people change dramatically over time, and often those changes result partly from what they have chosen to do for a living. Drawing on the work of Richard Sennett and Sandeep Jauhar, I explore how practicing in a market-driven medical system can corrupt the character of doctors.
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  5.  1
    Response—An Extreme Ordeal: Writing Emotion in Qualitative Research.Siun Gallagher - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):101-108.
    Responding to the stimulus afforded by Little et al.’s “Pragmatic pluralism: Mutual tolerance of contested understandings between orthodox and alternative practitioners in autologous stem cell transplantation,” this paper explores how the norms of qualitative inquiry affect the representation of emotion in research reports. It describes a conflict between the construction of emotion in qualitative research accounts and its application to analysis and theorization, whose origins may lie in researchers’ reticence when it comes to conveying or using the emotional features of (...)
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  6. Response—Liminality and the Mirage of Settlement.Claire Hooker & Ian Kerridge - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):55-60.
    Little and colleagues’ paper describing a key aspect of cancer patients’ experience, that of “liminality,” is remarkable for giving articulation to a very common and yet mostly overlooked aspect of patient experience. Little et. al. offered a formulation of liminality that deliberately set aside the concept’s more common use in analysing social rituals, in order to grasp at the interior experience that arises when failing bodily function and awareness of mortality are forced into someone’s consciousness, as occurs with a diagnosis (...)
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  7.  1
    Rethinking the Precedent Autonomy, Current Minimal Autonomy, and Current Well-Being in Medical Decisions for Persons with Dementia.Yuanyuan Huang, Yali Cong & Zhifeng Wang - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):163-175.
    As patient autonomy expands, a highly controversial issue has emerged. Should the advance directives of refusing life-saving treatments or requesting euthanasia of persons with dementia who express changed minds or are often in a happy state be fulfilled? There are two autonomy-related positions. The mainstream position in philosophical discussions supports the priority of ADs based on precedent autonomy. Buchanan and Brock, and Dworkin represent this view. The other position supports the priority of PWDs’ current wishes based on minimal autonomy represented (...)
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  8.  3
    Ethical Design and Use of Robotic Care of the Elderly.Carolyn Johnston - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):11-14.
    The Australian Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety acknowledged understaffing and substandard care in residential aged care and home care services, and recommendations were made that that the Australian Government should promote assistive technology within aged care. Robotic care assistants can provide care and companionship for the elderly—both in their own homes and within health and aged care institutions. Although more research is required into their use, studies indicate benefits, including enabling the elderly to live independently at home, (...)
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  9.  1
    Response—The Road Less Travelled: Why did Miles Little Turn to Qualitative Research and Where Did This Lead?Christopher F. C. Jordens - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):25-30.
    Miles Little is an Australian surgeon, poet, and philosopher whose published work spans diverse topics in surgery, medicine, philosophy, and bioethics. In 1974 he co-authored a survey that included an analysis of interviews conducted with amputees. This was his first foray into qualitative research. Twenty years later he established a research centre at the University of Sydney that initiated a programme of qualitative research in cancer medicine. For twenty years after that, the centre acted as a hub for research that (...)
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  10. Response—The Multiple Understandings in the Clinic Do Not Always Need to be Resolved.Paul A. Komesaroff - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):97-100.
    This article reflects on the assumption underlying the argument of Little et al. that "contested understandings" in the clinic are susceptible to reconciliation within a liberal framework described as "pragmatic pluralism". It is argued that no such reconciliation is possible or desirable because it is of the nature of the clinic that it provides a forum for multiple voices, ethical and cultural perspectives, and conceptual frameworks, and this is the source of its fecundity and creativity. Medicine itself cannot be represented (...)
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  11.  1
    Vascular Amputees: A Study in Disappointment.J. M. Little, Dora Petritsi-Jones & Charles Kerr - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):21-24.
    Despite optimistic reports about the results of amputation for advanced vascular disease, the patient’s assessment of advantages and disadvantages is seldom acknowledged. A detailed social study of 67 amputees has revealed considerable disparity between the patient’s views and those of the medical staff. About a third of the patients are forced to retire from active work by the amputation; about three-quarters report a serious decline in their social activities; only about half are really independent with prostheses in the long term; (...)
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  12.  1
    Pragmatic Pluralism: Mutual Tolerance of Contested Understandings Between Orthodox and Alternative Practitioners in Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation.Miles Little, Christopher F. C. Jordens, Catherine McGrath, Kathleen Montgomery, Ian Kerridge & Stacy M. Carter - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):85-96.
    High-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation is used to treat some advanced malignancies. It is a traumatic procedure, with a high complication rate and significant mortality. ASCT patients and their carers draw on many sources of information as they seek to understand the procedure and its consequences. Some seek information from beyond orthodox medicine. Alternative beliefs and practices may conflict with conventional understanding of the theory and practice of ASCT, and ‘contested understandings’ might interfere with patient adherence to the (...)
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  13.  1
    Liminality: A major category of the experience of cancer illness.Miles Little, Christopher F. C. Jordens, Kim Paul, Kathleen Montgomery & Bertil Philipson - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):37-48.
    Narrative analysis is well established as a means of examining the subjective experience of those who suffer chronic illness and cancer. In a study of perceptions of the outcomes of treatment of cancer of the colon, we have been struck by the consistency with which patients record three particular observations of their subjective experience: the immediate impact of the cancer diagnosis and a persisting identification as a cancer patient, regardless of the time since treatment and of the presence or absence (...)
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  14. Discourse Communities and the Discourse of Experience.Miles Little, Christopher F. C. Jordens & Emma-Jane Sayers - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):61-69.
    Discourse communities are groups of people who share common ideologies, and common ways of speaking about things. They can be sharply or loosely defined. We are each members of multiple discourse communities. Discourse can colonize the members of discourse communities, taking over domains of thought by means of ideology. The development of new discourse communities can serve positive ends, but discourse communities create risks as well. In our own work on the narratives of people with interests in health care, for (...)
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  15. An Archeology of Corruption in Medicine.Miles Little, Wendy Lipworth & Ian Kerridge - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):109-116.
    Corruption is a word used loosely to describe many kinds of action that people find distasteful. We prefer to reserve it for the intentional misuse of the good offices of an established social entity for private benefit, posing as fair trading. The currency of corruption is not always material or financial. Moral corruption is all too familiar within churches and other ostensibly beneficent institutions, and it happens within medicine and the pharmaceutical industries. Corrupt behavior reduces trust, costs money, causes injustice, (...)
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  16.  3
    Response—Forty-Seven Years Later: Further Studies in Disappointment?Michael Loughlin - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):31-36.
    This paper provides a commentary on “Vascular amputees: A study in disappointment” and its significance in the development of the disability rights movement, as well as the movements for values-based medicine and person-centred health and social care.
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  17. Response—A Critical Response to “Discourse Communities and the Discourse of Experience”.Paul Macneill - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):71-77.
    In their article Little, Jordens, and Sayers developed the notion of “discourse communities”—as groups of people who share an ideology and common “language”—with the support of seminal ideas from M.M. Bakhtin. Such communities provide benefits although they may also impose constraints. An ethical community would open to others’ discourse and be committed to critique. Those commitments may counter the limitations of discourse communities. Since their paper was published in 2003, the notion of “discourse communities” has been widely adopted and applied (...)
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  18.  2
    Response—Corruption, Trust, and Professional Regulation.Kathleen Montgomery - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):129-134.
    In their 2018 article in the Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics, Little, Lipworth, and Kerridge unpack the concept of corruption and clarify the mechanisms that foster corruption and allow it to persist, noting that organizations are “corruptogenic.” To address the “so-what” question, I draw on research about trust and trustworthiness, emphasizing that a person’s well-being and sense of security require trust to be present at both the individual and organizational levels—which is not possible in an environment where corruption and misconduct (...)
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  19.  7
    COVID-19 and Biomedical Experts: When Epistemic Authority is (Probably) Not Enough.Pietro Pietrini, Andrea Lavazza & Mirko Farina - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):135-142.
    This critical essay evaluates the potential integration of distinct kinds of expertise in policymaking, especially during situations of critical emergencies, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. This article relies on two case studies: herd immunity and restricted access to ventilators for disabled people. These case studies are discussed as examples of experts’ recommendations that have not been widely accepted, though they were made within the boundaries of expert epistemic authority. While the fundamental contribution of biomedical experts in devising public health policies (...)
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  20.  1
    Response—A Commentary on Miles Little Et Al. 1998. Liminality: A Major Category of the Experience of Cancer Illness. Social Science & Medicine 47(10): 1485-1494. [REVIEW]Jackie Leach Scully - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):49-54.
    This paper by Miles Little and colleagues identified the state they described as “liminal” within the trajectory of cancer survivorship. Since that time the concept of liminality has provided a powerful model to explore some of the difficulties experienced by people with severe and chronic illness. In this commentary I consider the expanding application of liminality not just to a widening range of medical conditions but to the consequences of therapeutic interventions as well and how this expansion has enriched and (...)
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  21.  11
    The Side Effects of Not Being Vaccinated: Individual Risk and Vaccine Hesitancy Nationalism.David Shaw - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):7-10.
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