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  1.  3
    The Whiteness of Bioethics.Warwick Anderson - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):93-97.
    A discussion of whiteness as an “ethos” or “relational category” in bioethics, drawing on examples from medical and historical research.
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  2.  2
    Biopower of Colonialism in Carceral Contexts: Implications for Aboriginal Deaths in Custody.Thalia Anthony & Harry Blagg - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):71-82.
    This article argues that criminal justice and health institutions under settler colonialism collude to create and sustain “truths” about First Nations lives that often render them as “bare life,” to use the term of Giorgio Agamben. First Nations peoples’ existence is stripped to its sheer biological fact of life and their humanity denied rights and dignity. First Nations people remain in a “state of exception” to the legal order and its standards of care. Zones of exception place First Nations people (...)
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  3.  12
    Teasing Out Artificial Intelligence in Medicine: An Ethical Critique of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in Medicine.Mark Henderson Arnold - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):121-139.
    The rapid adoption and implementation of artificial intelligence in medicine creates an ontologically distinct situation from prior care models. There are both potential advantages and disadvantages with such technology in advancing the interests of patients, with resultant ontological and epistemic concerns for physicians and patients relating to the instatiation of AI as a dependent, semi- or fully-autonomous agent in the encounter. The concept of libertarian paternalism potentially exercised by AI has created challenges to conventional assessments of patient and physician autonomy. (...)
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  4.  3
    The Shifts in Human Consciousness.Michael A. Ashby - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):1-4.
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  5.  9
    Black Bodies and Bioethics: Debunking Mythologies of Benevolence and Beneficence in Contemporary Indigenous Health Research in Colonial Australia.Chelsea J. Bond, David Singh & Sissy Tyson - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):83-92.
    We seek to bring Black bodies and lives into full view within the enterprise of Indigenous health research to interrogate the unquestioned good that is taken to characterize contemporary Indigenous health research. We articulate a Black bioethics that is not premised upon a false logic of beneficence, rather we think through a Black bioethics premised upon an unconditional love for the Black body. We achieve this by examining the accounts of two Black mothers, fictional and factual rendering visible the racial (...)
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  6.  4
    The Role of Emotion in Understanding Whiteness.Belinda Borell - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):23-31.
    This paper argues that stoicism as a central element of whiteness shapes, controls, and ultimately limits the experience and expression of emotion in public space. I explore how this may play out in particular medical settings like hospitals in Aotearoa New Zealand. I argue that working in conjunction with other values of whiteness identified by Myser —hyper-individualism, a contractual view of relationships, and an emphasis on personal control and autonomy—this makes hospitals emotionally unsafe spaces for Māori and other groups who (...)
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  7.  2
    Caregivers’ Understanding of Informed Consent in a Randomized Control Trial.Dorothy Helen Boyd, Yinan Zhang, Lee Smith, Lee Adam, L. Foster Page & W. M. Thomson - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):141-150.
    There are differences in caregivers’ literacy and health literacy levels that may affect their ability to consent to children participating in clinical research trials. This study aimed to explore the effectiveness, and caregivers’ understandings, of the process of informed consent that accompanied their child’s participation in a dental randomized control trial. Telephone interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of ten caregivers who each had a child participating in the RCT. Pre-tested closed and open-ended questions were used, and the findings (...)
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  8.  7
    Addressing Structural Racism Through Constitutional Transformation and Decolonization: Insights for the New Zealand Health Sector.Heather Came, Maria Baker & Tim McCreanor - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):59-70.
    In colonial states and settings, constitutional arrangements are often forged within contexts that serve to maintain structural racism against Indigenous people. In 2013 the New Zealand government initiated national conversations about the constitutional arrangements in Aotearoa. Māori leadership preceded this, initiating a comprehensive engagement process among Māori in 2010, which resulted in a report by Matike Mai Aotearoa which articulated a collective Māori vision of a written constitution congruent with te Tiriti o Waitangi by 2040.This conceptual article explores the Matike (...)
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  9.  6
    This Wasn’T a Split-Second Decision”: An Empirical Ethical Analysis of Transgender Youth Capacity, Rights, and Authority to Consent to Hormone Therapy.Beth A. Clark & Alice Virani - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):151-164.
    Inherent in providing healthcare for youth lie tensions among best interests, decision-making capacity, rights, and legal authority. Transgender youth experience barriers to needed gender-affirming care, often rooted in ethical and legal issues, such as healthcare provider concerns regarding youth capacity and rights to consent to hormone therapy. Even when decision-making capacity is present, youth may lack the legal authority to give consent. The aims of this paper are therefore to provide an empirical analysis of minor trans youth capacity to consent (...)
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  10.  3
    The Costs of Institutional Racism and its Ethical Implications for Healthcare.Amanuel Elias & Yin Paradies - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):45-58.
    This paper discusses the ethical implications of racism and some of the various costs associated with racism occurring at the institutional level. We argue that, in many ways, the laws, social structures, and institutions in Western society have operated to perpetuate the continuation of historical legacies of racial inequities with or without the intention of individuals and groups in society. By merely maintaining existing structures, laws, and social norms, society can impose social, economic, and health costs on racial minorities that (...)
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  11.  3
    Correction To: Picking and Choosing Among Phase I Trials.Jill A. Fisher, Torin Monahan & Rebecca L. Walker - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):193-193.
    The article "Picking and Choosing Among Phase I Trials", written by Jill A. Fisher, Torin Monahan and Rebecca L. Walker, was originally published Online First without Open Access. After publication in volume 16, issue 4, page 535-549 the author decided to opt for Open Choice and to make the article an Open Access publication.
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  12.  2
    Conscientious Objection, Conflicts of Interests, and Choosing the Right Analogies. A Reply to Pruski.Alberto Giubilini & Julian Savulescu - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):181-185.
    In this response paper, we respond to the criticisms that Michal Pruski raised against our article “Beyond Money: Conscientious Objection in Medicine as a Conflict of Interests.” We defend our original position against conscientious objection in healthcare by suggesting that the analogies Pruski uses to criticize our paper miss the relevant point and that some of the analogies he uses and the implications he draws are misplaced.
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  13.  5
    In Defence of Forgetting Evil: A Reply to Pilkington on Conscientious Objection.Jake Greenblum & T. J. Kasperbauer - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):189-191.
    In a recent article for this journal, Bryan Pilkington makes a number of critical observations about one of our arguments for non-traditional medical conscientious objectors’ duty to refer. Non-traditional conscientious objectors are those professionals who object to indirectly performing actions—like, say, referring to a physician who will perform an abortion. In our response here, we discuss his central objection and clarify our position on the role of value conflicts in non-traditional conscientious objection.
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  14.  2
    The Final Act: An Ethical Analysis of Pia Dijkstra’s Euthanasia for a Completed Life.T. J. Holzman - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):165-175.
    Amongst other countries, the Netherlands currently allows euthanasia, provided the physician performing the procedure adheres to a strict set of requirements. In 2016, Second Chamber member Pia Dijkstra submitted a law proposal which would also allow euthanasia without the reason necessarily having any medical foundation; euthanasia on the basis of a completed life. The debate on this topic has been ongoing for over two decades, but this law proposal has made the discussion much more immediate and concrete. This paper considers (...)
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  15.  3
    Race, Reproduction, and Biopolitics: A Review Essay.Christopher Mayes - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):99-107.
    This review essay critically examines Catherine Mills’s Biopolitics and Camisha Russell’s The Assisted Reproduction of Race. Although distinct works, the centrality of race and reproduction provides a point of connection and an opening into reframing contemporary debates within bioethics and biopolitics. In reviewing these books together I hope to show how biopolitical theory and critical philosophy of race can be useful in looking at bioethical problems from a new perspective that open up different kinds of analyses, especially around historically embedded (...)
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  16.  2
    Lead Essay—Institutional Racism, Whiteness, and the Role of Critical Bioethics.Christopher Mayes, Yin Paradies & Amanuel Elias - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):9-12.
    This paper discusses the ethical implications of racism and some of the various costs associated with racism occurring at the institutional level. We argue that, in many ways, the laws, social structures, and institutions in Western society have operated to perpetuate the continuation of historical legacies of racial inequities with or without the intention of individuals and groups in society. By merely maintaining existing structures, laws, and social norms, society can impose social, economic, and health costs on racial minorities that (...)
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  17.  3
    Medical Mistrust and Enduring Racism in South Africa.Tessa Moll - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):117-120.
    In this essay, I argue that exploring institutional racism also needs to examine interactions and communications between patients and providers. Exchange between bioethicists, social scientists, and life scientists should emphasize the biological effects—made evident through health disparities—of racism. I discuss this through examples of patient–provider communication in fertility clinics in South Africa and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic to emphasize the issue of mistrust between patients and medical institutions. Health disparities and medical mistrust are interrelated problems of racism in healthcare provision.
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  18.  4
    Being Seen by the Doctor: A Meditation on Power, Institutional Racism, and Medical Ethics.Bryan Mukandi - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):33-44.
    The following pages sketch the outlines of “a Canaanite reading” of the health system. Beginning with the Black person—African, Afro-diasporic, Aboriginal, and Torres Strait Islander—who is seen by a health professional, the functions and effects of the racializing gaze are examined. I wrestle with Al Saji’s understanding of “colonial disregard,” Whittaker’s insights into the extractive disposition of settler institutions vis-à-vis Indigenous peoples, and Saidiya Hartman and Fred Moten’s struggle with the spectacular. This leads me to conclude that the situation of (...)
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  19.  2
    Why Death Need Not Be “Reasonably Foreseeable”—The Proposed Legislative Response to Truchon and Gladu V Attorney General (Canada) and Attorney General (Quebec) [2019] QCCS 3792.Michaela Estelle Okninski - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):5-8.
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  20.  4
    Conflicts of Interest Result From Relationships But Are Not Resolved by Preventing Relationships.Carlo Petrini & Luciana Riva - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):187-188.
    Goldberg notes that the relationship is a component of Conflicts of Interests. Networks of relationships and the simultaneous presence of several interests are not negative per se but become so when they generate a conflict that undermines impartiality. The solution to the problem of COIs, therefore, cannot be to abolish relationships and the interests that they necessarily express but rather to verify whether those relationships are such as to unduly affect an individual’s judgement. The evolution of an Italian legislation about (...)
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  21.  4
    Reply to: Beyond Money: Conscientious Objection in Medicine as a Conflict of Interests.Michal Pruski - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):177-180.
    Giubilini and Savulescu in their recent Journal of Bioethical Inquiry symposium article presented an account of conscientious objection that argues for its recognition as a non-financial conflict of interest. In this short commentary, I highlight some problems with their account. First, I discuss their solicitor analogy. Second, I discuss some problems surrounding their objectivity claim about standards of medical care. Next, I discuss some issues arising from consistently applying their approach. Finally, I highlight that conscientious objection should be viewed not (...)
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  22.  7
    Bioethicists Should Be Helping Scientists Think About Race.Camisha Russell - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):109-111.
    In this essay, I argue that bioethicists have a thus-far unfulfilled role to play in helping life scientists, including medical doctors and researchers, think about race. I begin with descriptions of how life scientists tend to think about race and descriptions of typical approaches to bioethics. I then describe three different approaches to race: biological race, race as social construction, and race as cultural driver of history. Taking into account the historical and contemporary interplay of these three approaches, I suggest (...)
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  23.  7
    We’Re in This Together: A Reflection on How Bioethics and Public Health Can Collectively Advance Scientific Efforts Towards Addressing Racism.Mandy Truong & Mienah Z. Sharif - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):113-116.
    Racism is a key driver of the social, political, and economic injustices that cause and maintain health inequities. Over centuries and across continents, racism has become deeply ingrained within societies. Therefore, we believe that it is our professional and ethical obligation as scientists, and public health scholars specifically, to address racism head on in order to ameliorate racialized health disparities. We argue that greater focus is needed on addressing racism rather than race and how race is described or defined. We (...)
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  24.  9
    Bioethics, Race, and Contempt.Yolonda Yvette Wilson - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):13-22.
    The U.S. healthcare system has a long history of displaying racist contempt toward Black people. From medical schools’ use of enslaved bodies as cadavers to the widespread hospital practice of reporting suspected drug users who seek medical help to the police, the institutional practices and policies that have shaped U.S. healthcare systems as we know them cannot be minimized as coincidence. Rather, the very foundations of medical discovery, diagnosis, and treatment are built on racist contempt for Black people and have (...)
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