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  1.  5
    The Role of Precontractual Signals in Creating Sustainable Global Supply Chains.Robert C. Bird & Vivek Soundararajan - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 164 (1):81-94.
    Global supply chains enhance value, but are subject to governance problems and encourage evasive practices that deter sustainability, especially in developing countries. This article proposes that the precontractual environment, where parties are interested in trade but have not yet negotiated formal terms, can enable a unique process for building long-term sustainable relations. We argue that precontractual signals based on relation-specific investments, promises of repeated exchange, and reassuring cheap talk can be leveraged in precontract by the power of framing. We show (...)
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  2.  3
    Local Gambling Norms and Audit Pricing.Jeffrey L. Callen & Xiaohua Fang - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 164 (1):151-173.
    This study investigates whether local gambling norms are associated with audit pricing. Using a religion-based measure of local social gambling norms, we find strong evidence that public firms located in U.S. counties with more liberal gambling norms exhibit higher levels of audit fees. This result is consistent with our view that, as an important external risk factor, clients’ local gambling norms influence audit pricing decisions. Our findings are robust to a battery of sensitivity tests, including non-religion based measures of liberal (...)
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  3.  8
    An Analysis of Glass Ceiling Perceptions in the Accounting Profession.Jeffrey R. Cohen, Derek W. Dalton, Lori L. Holder-Webb & Jeffrey J. McMillan - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 164 (1):17-38.
    Access to a deep pool of talent is essential to the success of every professional services firm. The supply of that talent is contingent upon the available rewards for the exercise of that talent, and both the existence of the potential rewards and the beliefs that individuals hold about the existence of the rewards affect the decision to remain in the field. One structural factor that may affect the judgment about whether to remain in a profession concerns promotions based on (...)
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  4.  7
    The Influence of Ethical Codes of Conduct on Professionalism in Tax Practice.Darius Fatemi, John Hasseldine & Peggy Hite - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 164 (1):133-149.
    Professional integrity is a fundamental principle of the International Ethics Standards Board for Accountants Code of Ethics. This does not apply directly to members of a particular professional body, but rather member organizations from around the globe are required to adopt a code no less stringent than the principles in the IESBA Code. Hence, all professional accountants are required to possess integrity as a core ethical principle. In the USA, certified public accountants must, in addition, also adhere to the principle (...)
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  5.  4
    Does Humour Influence Perceptions of the Ethicality of Female-Disparaging Advertising?Vassiliki Grougiou, George Balabanis & Danae Manika - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 164 (1):1-16.
    This article responds to calls for further research on ethical issues in advertising. The study examines whether advertising strategies which use female-disparaging themes are perceived as ethical, and what effect this has on ad and brand attitudes. It also examines whether or not humour assuages ethical evaluations of female-disparaging ads. The findings from an experimental research design, which included 336 British respondents, show that non-disparaging and non-humorous ads are considered to be the most ethical, while disparaging ads are considered the (...)
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  6.  5
    Should Financial Gatekeepers Be Publicly Traded?Haozhi Huang, Mingsheng Li & Jing Shi - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 164 (1):175-200.
    We investigate how a broker firm’s initial public offering affects its analysts’ fiduciary duty of providing independent and objective recommendations. We find that the analysts of newly listed broker firms issue more positively biased recommendations in the first 2 to 3 years after their employers’ IPO than before the IPO. The increase in the recommendation bias is greater among analysts of affiliated brokers and brokers that raise additional capital after their IPO than among other analysts. Newly listed broker firms experience (...)
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  7.  12
    Navigating Embeddedness: Experiences of Indian IT Suppliers and Employees in the Netherlands.Ernesto Noronha, Premilla D’Cruz & Muneeb Ul Lateef Banday - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 164 (1):95-113.
    In this article, we shift the usual analytical attention of the GPN framework from lead firms to suppliers in the network and from production to IT services. Our focus is on how Indian IT suppliers embed in the Netherlands along the threefold characterization of societal, territorial and network embeddedness. We argue that Indian IT suppliers attempt to display societal embeddedness when they move to The Netherlands. Our findings reveal that the endeavour by Indian IT suppliers to territorially dis-embed from the (...)
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  8.  14
    Punishing Politeness: The Role of Language in Promoting Brand Trust.Aparna Sundar & Edita S. Cao - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 164 (1):39-60.
    Morality is an abstract consideration, and language is an important regulator of abstract thought. In instances of moral ambiguity, individuals may pay particular attention to matters of interactional justice. Politeness in language has been linked to greater perceptions of social distance, which we contend is instrumental in regulating attitudes toward a brand. We posit that politeness in a brand’s advertising will impact consumers who are attuned to violations of interactional justice [i.e., those with low belief in a just world ]. (...)
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  9.  4
    Promoting Ethical Reflection in the Teaching of Social Entrepreneurship: A Proposal Using Religious Parables.Nuria Toledano - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 164 (1):115-132.
    This paper proposes a teaching alternative that can encourage the ethical reflective sensibility among students of social entrepreneurship. It does so by exploring the possibility of using religious parables as narratives that can be analysed from Ricoeur’s hermeneutics to provoke and encourage ethical discussions in social entrepreneurship courses. To illustrate this argument, the paper makes use of a parable from the New Testament as an example of a religious narrative that can be used to prompt discussions about social entrepreneurs’ ethical (...)
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  10.  4
    Ethics Education in the Qualification of Professional Accountants: Insights from Australia and New Zealand.Andrew West & Sherrena Buckby - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 164 (1):61-80.
    This paper investigates how ethics is incorporated in the qualification process for prospective professional accountants across Australia and New Zealand. It does so by examining the structure of these qualification processes and by analysing the learning objectives and summarised content for ethics courses that prospective accountants take either at university or through the post-degree programs provided by CPA Australia and Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand. We do this to understand how the ‘sandwich’ approach to teaching ethics :77–92, 1993) is (...)
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  11.  9
    Guanxi or Justice? An Empirical Study of WeChat Voting.Yanju Zhou, Yi Yu, Xiaohong Chen & Xiongwei Zhou - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 164 (1):201-225.
    WeChat is not only a mobile application with many innovative features but is also representative of China’s electronic revolution. It is compatible with more than 90% of smart phones and has become an indispensable tool for daily use. People are captivated by various types of WeChat voting and canvassing activities, but little research has investigated whether such voting is based on guanxi or justice. Are people truly willing to vote on WeChat? Is WeChat voting an effective means of acquaintance marketing? (...)
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  12.  1
    Family Firms’ Religious Identity and Strategic Renewal.Sondos G. Abdelgawad & Shaker A. Zahra - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (4):775-787.
    We examine the role of religious identity in promoting strategic renewal in privately held founder family firms. Religious identity in these firms refers to their collective sense of being that reflects their founders’ and owner family members’ espoused religious values and beliefs, thereby distinguishing themselves from others in what is central, distinct, and enduring about their organization. We propose that such a religious identity determines family firms’ spiritual capital, which influences strategic renewal activities such as conflict resolution and resource allocation. (...)
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  13. Family Firms’ Religious Identity and Strategic Renewal.Sondos G. Abdelgawad & Shaker A. Zahra - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (4):775-787.
    We examine the role of religious identity in promoting strategic renewal in privately held founder family firms. Religious identity in these firms refers to their collective sense of being that reflects their founders’ and owner family members’ espoused religious values and beliefs, thereby distinguishing themselves from others in what is central, distinct, and enduring about their organization. We propose that such a religious identity determines family firms’ spiritual capital, which influences strategic renewal activities such as conflict resolution and resource allocation. (...)
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  14.  1
    Values, Spirituality and Religion: Family Business and the Roots of Sustainable Ethical Behavior.Joseph H. Astrachan, Claudia Binz Astrachan, Giovanna Campopiano & Massimo Baù - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (4):637-645.
    The inclusion of morally binding values such as religious—or in a broader sense, spiritual—values fundamentally alter organizational decision-making and ethical behavior. Family firms, being a particularly value-driven type of organization, provide ample room for religious beliefs to affect family, business, and individual decisions. The influence that the owning family is able to exert on value formation and preservation in the family business makes religious family firms an incubator for value-driven and faith-led decision-making and behavior. They represent a particularly rich and (...)
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  15.  4
    The Family That Prays Together Stays Together: Toward a Process Model of Religious Value Transmission in Family Firms.Francesco Barbera, Henry X. Shi, Ankit Agarwal & Mark Edwards - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (4):661-673.
    Research indicates that religious values and ethical behavior are closely associated, yet, at a firm level, the processes by which this association occurs are poorly understood. Family firms are known to exhibit values-based behavior, which in turn can lead to specific firm-level outcomes. It is also known that one’s family is an important incubator, enabler, and perpetuator of religious values across successive generations. Our study examines the experiences of a single, multigenerational business family that successfully enacted their religious values in (...)
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  16. Spirituality and Corporate Philanthropy in Indian Family Firms: An Exploratory Study.Navneet Bhatnagar, Pramodita Sharma & Kavil Ramachandran - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (4):715-728.
    Family firm philanthropy is the donation of resources to support societal betterment in ways meaningful for the controlling family. Family business literature suggests that socioemotional goals of achieving family prominence, harmony, and continuity drive FFP. However, these drivers fail to explain spiritually motivated philanthropic behaviors like anonymous giving by business families. 14 case studies of Indian Hindu business families with a combined FFP exceeding 2 billion INR in 2016–17 reveal spirituality or the moral dimension as an additional important driver of (...)
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  17.  1
    Exploring a Faith-Led Open-Systems Perspective of Stewardship in Family Businesses.Angela Carradus, Ricardo Zozimo & Allan Discua Cruz - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (4):701-714.
    The purpose of this study is to examine how faith-led practices in family firms affect organizational stewardship. Current studies highlight the relevance of religious adherence for family businesses, yet provide limited understanding of how this shapes the key traits of these organizations. Drawing on six autobiographies of family business leaders who openly express their adherence to their faith, and adopting an open-systems analysis of these autobiographies, we demonstrate that faith-led values influence organizational and leadership practices. Overall, our study suggests that (...)
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  18. Exploring a Faith-Led Open-Systems Perspective of Stewardship in Family Businesses.Angela Carradus, Ricardo Zozimo & Allan Discua Cruz - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (4):701-714.
    The purpose of this study is to examine how faith-led practices in family firms affect organizational stewardship. Current studies highlight the relevance of religious adherence for family businesses, yet provide limited understanding of how this shapes the key traits of these organizations. Drawing on six autobiographies of family business leaders who openly express their adherence to their faith, and adopting an open-systems analysis of these autobiographies, we demonstrate that faith-led values influence organizational and leadership practices. Overall, our study suggests that (...)
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  19. Articulating Values Through Identity Work: Advancing Family Business Ethics Research.Marleen Dieleman & Juliette Koning - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (4):675-687.
    Family values are argued to enable ethical family business conduct. However, how these arise, evolve, and how family leaders articulate them is less understood. Using an ‘identity work’ approach, this paper finds that the values underpinning identity work: arise from multiple sources, evolve in tandem with the context; and, that their articulation is relational and aspirational, rather than merely historical. Prior research mostly understood family values as rooted in the past and relatively stable, but our rhetorical analysis unlocks a more (...)
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  20.  1
    How Religion Shapes Family Business Ethical Behaviors: An Institutional Logics Perspective.Ramzi Fathallah, Yusuf Sidani & Sandra Khalil - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (4):647-659.
    Based on case studies of religious Muslim and Christian family firms operating in a religiously diverse country, we explain the multiplicity of family, business, religion, and community logics in the family firm. In particular, we give attention to the religion logic and how it interacts with other logics when family firms are considering ethical issues. We show that religion has a rule-based approach in Muslim family firms and a principle-based approach in Christian family firms. We also draw attention to the (...)
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  21.  3
    Islamic Family Business: The Constitutive Role of Religion in Business.Mustafa Kavas, Paula Jarzabkowski & Amit Nigam - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (4):689-700.
    Religion has significantly influenced societies throughout history and across the globe. Family firms—particularly those operating in strongly religious regions—are more likely to be subject to the influence of religion. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which religion affects business activities in family firms. We study how religion impacts business activities through a qualitative study of two Anatolian-based family firms in Turkey. We find that religion provides a dominant meaning system that plays a key role in constituting business activities (...)
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  22.  4
    Islamic Family Business: The Constitutive Role of Religion in Business.Mustafa Kavas, Paula Jarzabkowski & Amit Nigam - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (4):689-700.
    Religion has significantly influenced societies throughout history and across the globe. Family firms—particularly those operating in strongly religious regions—are more likely to be subject to the influence of religion. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which religion affects business activities in family firms. We study how religion impacts business activities through a qualitative study of two Anatolian-based family firms in Turkey. We find that religion provides a dominant meaning system that plays a key role in constituting business activities (...)
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  23. Value-Enhancing Social Responsibility: Market Reaction to Donations by Family vs. Non-family Firms with Religious CEOs.Min Maung, Danny Miller, Zhenyang Tang & Xiaowei Xu - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (4):745-758.
    Using a signaling framework, we argue that ethical behavior as evidenced by charitable donations is viewed more positively by investors when seen not to be based on self-serving motives but rather on authentic generosity that builds moral capital. The affirmed religiosity of CEOs may make their ethical position more credible, while their embeddedness within a family business suggests that CEOs are backed by powerful owners with long-time horizons and a desire to build moral capital with stakeholders. We find in a (...)
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  24. What Time May Tell: An Exploratory Study of the Relationship Between Religiosity, Temporal Orientation, and Goals in Family Business.Torsten M. Pieper, Ralph I. Williams, Scott C. Manley & Lucy M. Matthews - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (4):759-773.
    To study how religiosity affects family business goals, we merge literatures on goal setting, temporal orientation, and family business to argue that family business goals can be distinguished into short-term and long-term orientations and propose that religiosity affects both orientations, but to varying degrees. Drawing on a sample of private U.S. family businesses and applying partial least squares structural equations modeling, we find tentative support that religiosity has a stronger positive effect on long-term goal orientation than on short-term goal orientation. (...)
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  25.  1
    What Time May Tell: An Exploratory Study of the Relationship Between Religiosity, Temporal Orientation, and Goals in Family Business.Torsten M. Pieper, Ralph I. Williams, Scott C. Manley & Lucy M. Matthews - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (4):759-773.
    To study how religiosity affects family business goals, we merge literatures on goal setting, temporal orientation, and family business to argue that family business goals can be distinguished into short-term and long-term orientations and propose that religiosity affects both orientations, but to varying degrees. Drawing on a sample of private U.S. family businesses and applying partial least squares structural equations modeling, we find tentative support that religiosity has a stronger positive effect on long-term goal orientation than on short-term goal orientation. (...)
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  26.  2
    The Effects of Spiritual Leadership in Family Firms: A Conservation of Resources Perspective.William Tabor, Kristen Madison, Laura E. Marler & Franz W. Kellermanns - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (4):729-743.
    Drawing from conservation of resources theory, we theorize that spiritual leadership serves as both a resource to enhance employees’ organizational commitment and a passageway to mitigate the negative effects of work–family conflict. Using primary triadic data from leaders, family employees, and nonfamily employees in 77 family firms, results support our theorizing that organizational commitment is enhanced by spiritual leadership but is decreased by work–family conflict. Contrary to theory, however, spiritual leadership exacerbated the negative effects of work–family conflict. Further analysis reveals (...)
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  27.  12
    Trust Deficit and Anti-corruption Initiatives.Ismail Adelopo & Ibrahim Rufai - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (3):429-449.
    This study explores the ways in which trust deficit undermines anti-corruption initiatives in a context with systemic corruption. Anti-corruption measures as panacea to systemic corruption are not new, but their effectiveness is debatable. Whilst understanding the causal relationship between corruption and trust remains germane to fighting corruption, a growing number of recent studies advocate better context sensitivity in developing anti-corruption initiatives. Consistent with this, we unpack the perceptions of a significant section of the population in which corruption is rampant to (...)
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  28.  10
    Can Honesty Oaths, Peer Interaction, or Monitoring Mitigate Lying?Tobias Beck, Christoph Bühren, Björn Frank & Elina Khachatryan - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (3):467-484.
    We introduce several new variants of the dice experiment by Fischbacher and Föllmi-Heusi :525–547, 2013) to investigate measures to reduce lying. Hypotheses on the relative performance of these treatments are derived from a straightforward theoretical model. In line with previous research, we find that groups of two subjects lied at least to the same extent as individuals—even in a novel treatment where we assigned to one subject the role of being the other’s monitor. However, we find that our participants hardly (...)
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  29. Firm Responses to Mass Outrage: Technology, Blame, and Employment.Vikram R. Bhargava - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (3):379-400.
    When an employee’s off-duty conduct generates mass social media outrage, managers commonly respond by firing the employee. This, I argue, can be a mistake. The thesis I defend is the following: the fact that a firing would occur in a mass social media outrage context brought about by the employee’s off-duty conduct generates a strong ethical reason weighing against the act. In particular, it contributes to the firing constituting an inappropriate act of blame. Scholars who caution against firing an employee (...)
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  30.  15
    Modeling Leadership in Tolkien’s Fiction: Craft and Wisdom, Gift and Task.Randall G. Colton - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (3):401-415.
    This article contributes to conversations about the “Hitler problem” in leadership ethics and the use of literary narratives in leadership studies by proposing Tolkien’s fiction as a model of leadership. Resonating with Aristotelian and Thomistic themes, these narratives present leadership as more a matter of practical wisdom than of morally neutral craft, or, more precisely, they model leadership as a matter of using craft for the sake of wisdom’s ends. Those ends become intelligible in terms of a triadic account of (...)
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  31.  13
    When Does a Stock Boycott Work? Evidence from a Clinical Study of the Sudan Divestment Campaign.Ning Ding, Jerry T. Parwada, Jianfeng Shen & Shan Zhou - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (3):507-527.
    A stock divestment campaign is a common strategy used by social activists to pressure corporations to abandon undesirable practices. However, evidence on the effectiveness of the strategy remains mixed. In this paper, we examine the effectiveness of an international stock boycott by studying a large sample of institutional investor transactions in four emerging market stocks targeted by the Sudan divestment campaign from 2001 to 2012. We find evidence of a negative relationship between the intensity of the campaign and the ownership (...)
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  32.  12
    Reading Institutional Logics of CSR in India from a Post-colonial Location.Nimruji Jammulamadaka - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (3):599-617.
    The paper goes beyond critique to read institutional approaches, specifically institutional logics of CSR in India and their management by Indian firms, from a post-colonial location, to explore decolonising possibilities. Drawing on post-colonial approach of catachrestic reading, it reads institutional logics of CSR literature to argue against a linear hierarchical travel of western CSR logic into India, which is then adapted/adopted/translated or decoupled, along with the secondary status this implies for India; and suggests that Indian and western CSR logics are (...)
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  33.  9
    Is a Uniform Approach to Whistle-Blowing Regulation Effective? Evidence from the United States and Germany.Gladys Lee, Esther Pittroff & Michael J. Turner - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (3):553-576.
    The purpose of this study is to examine whether United States -style regulatory intervention to encourage whistle-blowing can be immediately effective if transplanted into another country with a distinctly different historical cultural background and institutional system. A total of 98 U.S. and 84 German accountants participated in a laboratory experiment relating to a case of financial statement fraud. The provision of anti-retaliation protection and monetary rewards for whistle-blowing were manipulated and participants were asked to assume the role of an internal (...)
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  34.  10
    CSR Reputation and Firm Performance: A Dynamic Approach.Stewart R. Miller, Lorraine Eden & Dan Li - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (3):619-636.
    Many countries have regulations that require firms to engage in minimum levels of corporate social activities in areas such as the environment and social welfare. In this paper, we argue that changes in a firm’s compliance with CS regulations are reflected in its reputation for corporate social responsibility, which affects the firm’s performance. The performance impacts depend on whether the firm’s CSR reputation in the current and prior periods is positive, neutral, or negative. Our theoretical framework draws on the reputation (...)
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  35.  11
    Vortex of Corruption: Longitudinal Analysis of Normative Pressures in Top Global Companies.Leyla Orudzheva, Manjula S. Salimath & Robert Pavur - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (3):529-551.
    It is widely acknowledged that corruption by any firm is problematic. More importantly, its negative effects are compounded when corruption is present in large firms with global reach and corruption ceases to be a single instance but becomes a reoccurring or perpetuating phenomenon over time. Though the magnification of corruption over both time and size of operations creates scale effects that amplify its detrimental consequences, this context remains largely unexamined empirically. Thus, our research question is: What are the factors that (...)
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  36.  16
    The Value of Apology: How Do Corporate Apologies Moderate the Stock Market Reaction to Non-Financial Corporate Crises?Marie Racine, Craig Wilson & Michael Wynes - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (3):485-505.
    In a crisis, managers are confronted with a dilemma between their ethical responsibility to respond to victims and their fiduciary responsibility to protect shareholder value. In this study, we use a unique and comprehensive dataset of 223 non-financial crises between 1983 and 2013 to investigate how corporate apologies affect stock prices. Our empirical evidence shows that the stock price response from apologizing depends on the firm’s level of responsibility for the crisis. We find that to protect shareholder value, management needs (...)
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  37.  8
    Ethical Purchasing Dissonance: Antecedents and Coping Behaviors.Tim Reilly, Amit Saini & Jenifer Skiba - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (3):577-597.
    The pressure of oversight and scrutiny in the business-to-business purchasing process has the potential to cause psychological distress in purchasing professionals, giving rise to apprehensions about being ethically inappropriate. Utilizing depth interviews with public sector purchasing professionals in a phenomenological approach, the authors develop the notion of ethical purchasing dissonance to explain the psychological distress. An inductively derived conceptual framework is presented for ethical purchasing dissonance that explores its potential antecedents and consequences; illustrative propositions are presented, and managerial implications are (...)
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  38.  19
    Aristotelian Practical Wisdom in Business Ethics: Two Neglected Components.Steven Steyl - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (3):417-428.
    The revival of virtue ethics in contemporary moral philosophy had a major impact on business ethicists, among whom the virtues have become a staple subject of inquiry. Aristotle’s phronēsis is one of those virtues, and a number of texts have examined it in some detail. But analyses of phronēsis in business ethics have neglected some of its most significant and interesting elements. In this paper, I dissect two neglected components of practical wisdom as outlined in Book VI of the Nicomachean (...)
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  39.  15
    Ethics from Below: Secrecy and the Maintenance of Ethics.Dima Younes, David Courpasson & Marie-Rachel Jacob - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (3):451-466.
    Secrecy and ethics are often seen as opposing forces within organizations. Secret work is viewed as unethical, as it excludes others from knowing and is associated with self-interested behavior. We contend that this view does not account for the dynamic inherent to secrecy and to the fact that ethics is embedded in social relations. This paper suggests an alternative view. We consider secrecy as a social process which allows employees to maintain their ethics when faced with managerial policies that affect (...)
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  40.  13
    Is Corporate Tax Aggressiveness a Reputation Threat? Corporate Accountability, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Corporate Tax Behavior.Lisa Baudot, Joseph A. Johnson, Anna Roberts & Robin W. Roberts - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (2):197-215.
    In this paper, we consider the relationships among corporate accountability, reputation, and tax behavior as a corporate social responsibility issue. As part of our investigation, we provide empirical examples of corporate reputation and corporate tax behaviors using a sample of large, U.S.-based multinational companies. In addition, we utilize corporate tax controversies to illustrate possibilities for aggressive corporate tax behaviors of high-profile multinationals to become a reputation threat. Finally, we consider whether reputation serves as an accountability mechanism for corporate tax behaviors (...)
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  41.  11
    Managing Algorithmic Accountability: Balancing Reputational Concerns, Engagement Strategies, and the Potential of Rational Discourse.Alexander Buhmann, Johannes Paßmann & Christian Fieseler - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (2):265-280.
    While organizations today make extensive use of complex algorithms, the notion of algorithmic accountability remains an elusive ideal due to the opacity and fluidity of algorithms. In this article, we develop a framework for managing algorithmic accountability that highlights three interrelated dimensions: reputational concerns, engagement strategies, and discourse principles. The framework clarifies that accountability processes for algorithms are driven by reputational concerns about the epistemic setup, opacity, and outcomes of algorithms; that the way in which organizations practically engage with emergent (...)
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  42.  6
    Orientation Toward Key Non-family Stakeholders and Economic Performance in Family Firms: The Role of Family Identification with the Firm.Mª de la Cruz Déniz-Déniz, Mª Katiuska Cabrera-Suárez & Josefa D. Martín-Santana - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (2):329-345.
    Based on the literature on stakeholder management and family firm dynamics, this research analyses the relationship between three constructs: the identification of business families with their family firms, FFs’ orientation toward key non-family stakeholders, and the achievement of better economic performance. Data analyses from 374 family and non-family members of 173 Spanish FFs show that a high level of family identification with their firms affects the orientation of FFs toward key non-family stakeholders in setting corporate goals and that this orientation (...)
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  43.  11
    The Trust Triangle: Laws, Reputation, and Culture in Empirical Finance Research.Quentin Dupont & Jonathan M. Karpoff - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (2):217-238.
    We propose a construct, the Trust Triangle, that highlights three primary mechanisms that provide ex post accountability for opportunistic behavior and motivate ex ante trust in economic relationships. The mechanisms are a society’s legal and regulatory framework, market-based discipline and reputational capital, and culture, including individual ethics and social norms. The Trust Triangle provides a framework to conceptualize the relationships between trust, corporate accountability, legal liability, reputation, and culture. We use the Trust Triangle to summarize recent developments in the empirical (...)
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  44.  4
    Pathways to Corporate Accountability: Corporate Reputation and Its Alternatives.Craig E. Carroll & Rowena Olegario - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (2):173-181.
    The aim of our themed symposium is to explore the limits and possibilities of corporate reputation for enabling corporate accountability. We articulate three perspectives on corporate accountability. The communicative perspective equates accountability with disclosure and stakeholder engagement. The phenomenological perspective focuses on stakeholder expectations and reputation management. The consequential perspective focuses on effects/consequences. We then examine how corporate accountability is understood, how it relates to ideals, mission, and purpose, alternative pathways to corporate accountability, reputational consequences, and the role algorithms play (...)
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  45.  14
    Ethical Implications of Management Accounting and Control: A Systematic Review of the Contributions from the Journal of Business Ethics.Christoph Endenich & Rouven Trapp - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (2):309-328.
    Management accounting and control seeks to provide information that substantiates decision-making at all firm levels and thus may also foster ethical decision-making. Against this background, this article presents a systematic literature review of research on management accounting and control and business ethics that has been published in the Journal of Business Ethics. Through this review, we intend to bring to the forefront a research topic that has been widely neglected in broader literature reviews on accounting ethics research and that has (...)
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  46.  7
    Ideals-Based Accountability and Reputation in Select Family Firms.Isabelle Le Breton-Miller & Danny Miller - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (2):183-196.
    We develop a model of ideals-based accountability which we have witnessed at work in several long-thriving family businesses. The owners and managers of these firms eschew individualism and materiality in the pursuit of ethical ideals such as supporting democracy and bettering the human condition. Although accountability is to these ideals, not for outcomes such as profitability or even reputation, IBA has resulted in outstanding reputations for some firms. We characterize IBA according to its missions, leadership, culture, and stakeholder relationships. We (...)
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  47.  7
    How the Design of CEO Equity-Based Compensation can Lead to Lower Audit Fees: Evidence from Australia.Xin Qu, Daifei Yao & Majella Percy - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (2):281-308.
    This paper investigates how the features of CEO equity-based compensation are associated with the agency costs of monitoring in an Australia setting. We find that audit fees significantly increase when firms award large equity grants to CEOs, which is consistent with the notion that auditors perceive higher risk associated with large equity incentives. However, by empirically testing auditors’ responses to the adoption of performance-vesting provisions, we document evidence that it is the use of accounting-based hurdles that potentially encourages unethical reporting (...)
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  48.  15
    Moral Intensity, Issue Characteristics, and Ethical Issue Recognition in Sales Situations.Evelyne Rousselet, Bérangère Brial, Romain Cadario & Amina Béji-Bécheur - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (2):347-363.
    Researchers have considered individual and organizational factors of ethical decision making. However, they have little interest in situational factors :101–125, 2013) which is surprising given the many situations sales persons face. We address this issue using two pilot qualitative studies successively and a 2 by 2 within-subject experiment with sales scenarios. Qualitative and quantitative data are obtained from front-line employees of the main French retail banks that serve low-income customers. We show that the recognition of an ethical issue differs depending (...)
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  49.  11
    Changes in Firms’ Political Investment Opportunities, Managerial Accountability, and Reputational Risk.Hollis A. Skaife & Timothy Werner - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (2):239-263.
    We use the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission to assess the reputational risks created by political investment opportunities that allow managers to spend unlimited and potentially undisclosed firm resources on independent political expenditures. This new opportunity raises important ethical questions, as it is difficult, and perhaps impossible, under current law for shareholders to hold managers accountable for this investment choice and the reputational risks it entails. Using firms’ known political activity as a proxy for (...)
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  50.  6
    Investor-Paid Ratings and Conflicts of Interest.Leo Tang, Marietta Peytcheva & Pei Li - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (2):365-378.
    The Securities and Exchange Commission sanctioned investor-paid rating agency Egan-Jones for falsely stating that it did not know its clients’ investment positions. The SEC’s action against Egan-Jones raises the broad question whether knowledge of clients’ investment positions creates a conflict of interest for investor-paid ratings. In an experimental setting, we find that investor-paid rating agencies are likely to assign credit ratings that are biased in favor of their clients’ positions, and that this effect is attenuated when the rated company has (...)
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  51.  5
    Balancing the Scales of Justice: Do Perceptions of Buyers’ Justice Drive Suppliers’ Social Performance?Mohammad Alghababsheh, David Gallear & Mushfiqur Rahman - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (1):125-150.
    A major challenge for supply chain managers is how to manage sourcing relationships to ensure reliable and predictable actions of distant suppliers. The extant research into sustainable supply chain management has traditionally focused on the transactional and collaboration approaches through which buyers encourage suppliers to act responsibly. However, little effort has been devoted to investigating the factors that underpin and enable effective implementation of these two approaches, or to exploring alternative approaches to help sustain an acceptable level of social performance (...)
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  52.  8
    The Three Dimensions of Sustainability: A Delicate Balancing Act for Entrepreneurs Made More Complex by Stakeholder Expectations.Denise Fischer, Malte Brettel & René Mauer - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (1):87-106.
    Previous research on sustainable entrepreneurship has mainly aimed to understand the antecedents of entrepreneurs’ sustainability-oriented behavior. Yet the literature lacks a more nuanced understanding of how entrepreneurs implement sustainability strategies when creating a new venture. Drawing on sustainability concepts, we first examine how entrepreneurs balance the economic, environmental, and social dimensions as part of their ventures’ strategic ambitions. We show that sustainable entrepreneurs prioritize the three sustainability dimensions and possibly reprioritize them in response to stakeholder interests. Applying a stakeholder theory (...)
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  53.  16
    Co-creation: A Key Link Between Corporate Social Responsibility, Customer Trust, and Customer Loyalty.Oriol Iglesias, Stefan Markovic, Mehdi Bagherzadeh & Jatinder Jit Singh - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (1):151-166.
    In an ever more transparent, digitalized, and connected environment, customers are increasingly pressuring brands to embrace genuine corporate social responsibility practices and co-creation activities. While both CSR and co-creation are social and collaborative processes, there is still little research examining whether CSR can boost co-creation. In addition, while previous research has mainly related co-creation to emotional outcomes, limited empirical research has related it to rational and behavioral outcomes. To address these shortcomings in the literature, this paper examines the influence of (...)
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  54.  7
    Sustainability-Related Identities and the Institutional Environment: The Case of New Zealand Owner–Managers of Small- and Medium-Sized Hospitality Businesses.Eva Kiefhaber, Kathryn Pavlovich & Katharina Spraul - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (1):37-51.
    While it is well known that SME owner–managers’ sustainability values and attitudes impact their company’s sustainability activities, they often face profit-driven institutional orders. In a qualitative study, we investigate which identities are critical for their engagement in sustainability and how these identities interrelate with their institutional environment. We applied a qualitative design with narratives from 29 owner–managers of hospitality businesses who belong to a New Zealand-based sustainability network. Our study revealed no single overarching sustainability identity; instead, six identities could be (...)
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  55.  13
    Correction to: Institutionalization of the Contents of Sustainability Assurance Services: A Comparison Between Italy and United States.Carlos Larrinaga, Adriana Rossi, Mercedes Luque-Vilchez & Manuel Núñez-Nickel - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (1):85-85.
    The original article was published without open access and with the copyright notice indicating © Springer Nature B.V. The article is now open access with the copyright residing with the authors.
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  56.  7
    Institutionalization of the Contents of Sustainability Assurance Services: A Comparison Between Italy and United States.Carlos Larrinaga, Adriana Rossi, Mercedes Luque-Vilchez & Manuel Núñez-Nickel - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (1):67-83.
    A descriptive-exploratory analysis of assurance practices is presented in this paper, by analysing the patterns of sustainability assurance reporting in two national contexts with different levels of assurance activity over a period of 11 years. The study is based on theoretical insights drawn from institutional sociology and normativity production. It is framed both in the Italian situation, where assurance statements consistently include a narrow set of formal and procedural communications, and in an unsettled situation in the U.S., where assurance activity (...)
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  57.  5
    Review of The Mueller Report. [REVIEW]Jooho Lee - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (1):167-172.
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  58.  5
    Problems of Fact, Method, Theory, and Concepts in Tsoukas.Anita M. McGahan - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (1):23-35.
    On January, 27, 2017, U.S. President Donald J. Trump issued Executive Order 13769 on immigration and travel, which restricted entry into the U.S. of the citizens of seven primarily Muslim countries. Many academics reacted with outrage, including me and other members of the Academy of Management, of which I was President at the time. Some scholarly associations condemned EO 13769 as immoral, but the AOM did not immediately issue such a condemnation because the AOM’s Constitution included a policy of no-political-stands (...)
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  59.  49
    “They Did Not Walk the Green Talk!:” How Information Specificity Influences Consumer Evaluations of Disconfirmed Environmental Claims.Davide C. Orazi & Eugene Y. Chan - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (1):107-123.
    While environmental claims are increasingly used by companies to appeal consumers, they also attract greater scrutiny from independent parties interested in consumer protection. Consumers are now able to compare corporate environmental claims against external, often disconfirming, information to form their brand attitudes and purchase intentions. What remains unclear is how the level of information specificity of both the environmental claims and external disconfirming information interact to influence consumer reactions. Two experiments address this gap in the CSR communication literature. When specific (...)
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  60.  2
    “Speaking on Behalf of…”: Leadership Ethics and the Collective Nature of Moral Reflection.Andreas Rasche - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (1):13-22.
    In this essay I discuss two limitations that emerge when considering Tsoukas analysis of the Academy of Management’s initial response to the travel ban issued by President Trump in 2017. First, I suggest that any initial official response on the part of AOM would have required its leaders to “speak on behalf of” all AOM members and thus would have created a number of problems. We therefore need to take better account of others’ perspectives whenever speaking for others. For this (...)
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  61.  12
    Managing Tensions in Corporate Sustainability Through a Practical Wisdom Lens.Laura F. Sasse-Werhahn, Claudius Bachmann & André Habisch - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (1):53-66.
    Previous research has underlined the significance of practical wisdom pertaining to corporate sustainability. Recent studies, however, have identified managing opposing but interlocked tensions related to environmental, social, and economic aspects as one of the most crucial future challenges in CS. Therefore, we apply the established link between wisdom and sustainability to the pressing topic of managing tensions in CS. We commence with a literature overview of tensions in sustainability management, which manifests our basic work assumption concerning the need for practical (...)
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  62.  4
    Correction to: Leadership, the American Academy of Management, and President Trump’s Travel Ban: A Case Study in Moral Imagination.Haridimos Tsoukas - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (1):11-12.
    This notice serves to identify and correct the following inaccuracies in article Tsoukas Leadership, the Academy of Management, and President Trump’s Travel Ban: A Case Study in Moral Imagination published online on 26 July 2018.
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  63.  9
    Leadership, the American Academy of Management, and President Trump’s Travel Ban: A Case Study in Moral Imagination.Haridimos Tsoukas - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (1):1-10.
    In this essay, I focus on the initial reaction of the then leadership of the Academy of Management to President Trump’s travel ban issued in January 2017. By viewing the travel ban in purely administrative terms, AOM leadership framed it as an example of “political speech”, on which they were organizationally barred to take a public stand. I subject this view to critical assessment, arguing that the travel ban had a distinct moral character, which was antithetical to scholarly values. Τhe (...)
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  64. Lights Off, Spot On: Carbon Literacy Training Crossing Boundaries in the Television Industry.Wendy Chapple, Petra Molthan-Hill, Rachel Welton & Michael Hewitt - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (4):813-834.
    Proclaimed the “greenest television programme in the world,” the award-winning soap opera Coronation Street is seen as an industry success story. This paper explores how the integration of carbon literacy training led to a widespread transformational change of practice within Coronation Street. Using the theoretical lens of Communities of Practice, this study examines the nature of social learning and the enablers and barriers to change within the organization. Specifically, how boundary spanning practices, objects and people led to the transformation on (...)
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  65.  2
    Varieties of Responsible Management Learning: A Review, Typology and Research Agenda.John G. Cullen - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (4):759-773.
    Over the past two decades an increasing number of research papers have signalled growing interest in more responsible, sustainable and ethical modes of management education. This systematic literature review of peer-reviewed publications on, and allied to, the concept of responsible management learning and education confirms that scholarly interest in the topic has accelerated over the last decade. Rather than assuming that RMLE is one thing, however, this review proposes that the literature on responsible management education and learning can be divided (...)
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  66.  1
    Competences for Environmental Sustainability: A Systematic Review on the Impact of Absorptive Capacity and Capabilities.Tulin Dzhengiz & Eva Niesten - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (4):881-906.
    Responsible management competences are the skills of managers to deal with the triple bottom line, stakeholder value and moral dilemmas. In this paper, we analyse how managers develop responsible management competences and how the competences interact with capabilities at the organisational level. The paper contributes to the responsible management literature by integrating research on absorptive capacity and organisational learning. By creating intersections between these disparate research streams, this study enables a better understanding of the development of responsible management competences. The (...)
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  67. Achieving Responsible Management Learning Through Enriched Reciprocal Learning: Service-Learning Projects and the Role of Boundary Spanners.Martin Fougère, Nikodemus Solitander & Sanchi Maheshwari - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (4):795-812.
    Through its focus on deep and experiential learning, service-learning has become increasingly popular within the business school curriculum. While a reciprocal dimension has been foundational to SL, the reciprocality that is emphasized in business ethics literature is often on the relationship between the service experience and the academic content, rather than reciprocal learning of the service providers and the recipients, let alone other stakeholders. Drawing on the notion of enriched reciprocal learning and on Aristotle’s typology of modes of knowing, we (...)
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  68.  3
    From Preaching to Behavioral Change: Fostering Ethics and Compliance Learning in the Workplace.Christian Hauser - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (4):835-855.
    Despite the increasing inclusion of ethics and compliance issues in corporate training, the business world remains rife with breaches of responsible management conduct. This situation indicates a knowledge–practice gap among professionals, i.e., a discrepancy between their knowledge of responsible management principles and their behavior in day-to-day business life. With this in mind, this paper addresses the formative, developmental question of how companies’ ethics and compliance training programs should be organized in a manner that enhances their potential to be effective. Drawing (...)
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  69.  3
    Constellations of Transdisciplinary Practices: A Map and Research Agenda for the Responsible Management Learning Field. [REVIEW]Oliver Laasch, Dirk Moosmayer, Elena Antonacopoulou & Stefan Schaltegger - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (4):735-757.
    The emerging field of responsible management learning is characterized by an urgent need for transdisciplinary practices. We conceptualize constellations of transdisciplinary practices by building up on a social practice perspective. From this perspective, knowledge and learning are ‘done’ in interrelated practices that may span multiple fields like the professional, educational, and research field. Such practices integrate knowledge across disciplines and sectors in order to learn to enact, educate, and research complex responsible management. Accordingly, constellations of collaborative transdisciplinary practices span the (...)
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  70.  1
    What on Earth Should Managers Learn About Corporate Sustainability? A Threshold Concept Approach.Ivan Montiel, Peter Jack Gallo & Raquel Antolin-Lopez - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (4):857-880.
    The Earth is facing pressing societal grand challenges that require urgent managerial action. Responsible management learning has emerged as a discipline to prepare managers to act as responsible leaders that can effectively address such pressing challenges. This article aims to extend current knowledge on RML in the domain of corporate sustainability through the application of threshold concepts, novel ideas which provide a doorway to new knowledge and transform a learner’s mindset. Specifically, after conducting a systematic review of the management literature, (...)
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  71. What on Earth Should Managers Learn About Corporate Sustainability? A Threshold Concept Approach.Ivan Montiel, Peter Jack Gallo & Raquel Antolin-Lopez - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (4):857-880.
    The Earth is facing pressing societal grand challenges that require urgent managerial action. Responsible management learning has emerged as a discipline to prepare managers to act as responsible leaders that can effectively address such pressing challenges. This article aims to extend current knowledge on RML in the domain of corporate sustainability through the application of threshold concepts, novel ideas which provide a doorway to new knowledge and transform a learner’s mindset. Specifically, after conducting a systematic review of the management literature, (...)
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  72.  1
    A Humanistic Narrative for Responsible Management Learning: An Ontological Perspective.Michael Pirson - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (4):775-793.
    Why has responsible management been so difficult and why is the chorus of stakeholders demanding such responsibility getting louder? We argue that management learning has been framed within the narrative of economism. As such, we argue that managers need to be aware of the paradigmatic frame of the dominant economistic narrative and learn to transcend it. We also argue that for true managerial responsibility, an alternative humanistic narrative is more fit for purpose. This humanistic narrative is based on epistemological metaphors (...)
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  73.  19
    How to Overcome Structural Injustice? Social Connectedness and the Tenet of Subsidiarity.Michael S. Aßländer - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (3):719-732.
    Referring to the phenomenon of structural injustice resulting from unintended consequences of the combination of the actions of many people, Iris Marion Young claims for a new understanding of responsibility. She proposes what she calls a social connection model of responsibility which assigns responsibility to individuals also for participating in ongoing structural and social processes. To remedy structural injustice Young claims for collective action of various actors in society and assigns different degrees of responsibility depending on the agent’s position within (...)
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  74.  11
    Understanding Economic Inequality Through the Lens of Caste.Hari Bapuji & Snehanjali Chrispal - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (3):533-551.
    Research on economic inequality has largely focused on understanding the relationship between organizations and inequality but has paid limited attention to the role of institutions in the creation and maintenance of inequality. In this article, we use insights from the caste system—an institution that perpetuates socio-economic inequalities and limits human functions—to elaborate on three elements of economic inequality: uneven dispersions in resource endowments, uneven access to productive resources and opportunities, and uneven rewards to resource contributions. We argue that economic inequalities (...)
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  75.  12
    Think Tanks, Business and Civil Society: The Ethics of Promoting Pro-corporate Ideologies.Amon Barros & Scott Taylor - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (3):505-517.
    Think tanks became key political and economic actors during the twentieth century, creating and occupying an intellectual and political position between academic institutions, the state, civil society, and public debate on organization and management. Think tanks are especially active in setting frames for what constitutes politically and socially acceptable ways of thinking about economic activity and the rights or obligations of corporations. Their operation and influence has been acknowledged and analysed in political science and policy analysis, but in organization and (...)
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  76.  1
    Correction to: How do Consumers Reconcile Positive and Negative CSR-Related Information to Form an Ethical Brand Perception? A Mixed Method Inquiry.Katja H. Brunk & Cara de Boer - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (3):733-733.
    This article is incorrectly classified as Review Paper in the online and print publication. The correct classification for this article is Original Paper. The publisher apologizes for the inconvenience caused.
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  77.  3
    Does Religiosity Matter to Value Relevance? Evidence from U.S. Banking Firms.Lamia Chourou - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (3):675-697.
    This study examines whether religiosity is associated with the valuation multiples investors assign to fair-valued assets that are susceptible to managerial bias. Using a sample of U.S. banking firms, I find that the value relevance of such assets is higher for firms located in more religious counties than it is for firms located in less religious counties. Moreover, I find that this result is more consistent with the ethicality trait than the risk aversion trait of more religious individuals. Additional tests (...)
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  78.  10
    Cheating in Business: A Metaethical Perspective.Marian Eabrasu - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (3):519-532.
    Although the managerial practice of cheating spans complex and heterogeneous situations, most business ethics scholars consider that the very idea of cheating is indefensible on moral grounds, and quickly dismiss it as wrongdoing. This paper proposes to fine-tune this conventional moral assessment by arguing that some forms of cheating can be justified—or at least excused. To do so, it starts with a value-free definition of cheating that covers a wide diversity of situations: “breaking the rules while deliberately leading or allowing (...)
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  79.  14
    Tax Fairness: Conceptual Foundations and Empirical Measurement.Jonathan Farrar, Dawn W. Massey, Errol Osecki & Linda Thorne - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (3):487-503.
    Prior research shows taxpayers’ perceptions of fairness leads to greater cooperation and compliance with tax authorities. Yet our understanding of tax fairness has been hampered by its general reliance upon models and measures of fairness developed by organizational fairness research, even though fairness is a perception subject to contextual influences. Accordingly, we attempt to gain insight into the influence of contextual factors on fairness through the development of a theoretically based and empirically derived model of tax fairness, grounded in organizational (...)
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  80.  7
    The Ethics of Engagement in an Age of Austerity: A Paradox Perspective.Helen Francis & Anne Keegan - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (3):593-607.
    Our contribution in this paper is to highlight the ethical implications of workforce engagement strategies in an age of austerity. Hard or instrumentalist approaches to workforce engagement create the potential for situations where engaged employees are expected to work ever longer and harder with negative outcomes for their well-being. Our study explores these issues in an investigation of the enactment of an engagement strategy within a UK Health charity, where managers and workers face paradoxical demands to raise service quality and (...)
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  81.  18
    Denial of Corruption: Voluntary Disclosure of Bribery Information.Susana Gago-Rodríguez, Gilberto Márquez-Illescas & Manuel Núñez-Nickel - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (3):609-626.
    This study explores the rationality behind firms’ decision to admit or deny their involvement in bribery when responding to confidential surveys conducted by international agencies. Specifically, we posit that firms’ reluctance to provide accurate information about their engagement in bribery is at least to some extent contingent on certain situational factors. In other words, we claim that this behavior is context dependent. The paper uses the notions provided by the theory of planned behavior to understand the way in which the (...)
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  82.  14
    What is a Fair Level of Profit for Social Enterprise? Insights from Microfinance.Marek Hudon, Marc Labie & Patrick Reichert - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (3):627-644.
    Although microfinance organizations are generally considered as inherently ethical, recent events have challenged the legitimacy of the sector. High interest rates and the excessive profitability of some market leaders have raised the question of how to define a fair profit level for social enterprise. In this article, we construct a fair profit framework based on four dimensions: profitability, social mission, pricing, and surplus distribution. We then apply this framework using an empirical sample of 496 microfinance institutions. Results indicate that satisfying (...)
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  83.  13
    ‘Doing Dignity Work’: Indian Security Guards’ Interface with Precariousness.Ernesto Noronha, Saikat Chakraborty & Premilla D’Cruz - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (3):553-575.
    Increasing global competition has intensified the use of informal sector workforce worldwide. This phenomenon is true with regard to India, where 92% of the workers hold precarious jobs. Our study examines the dynamics of workplace dignity in the context of Indian security guards deployed as contract labour by private suppliers, recognising that security guards’ jobs were marked by easy access, low status, disrespect and precariousness. The experiences of guards serving bank ATMs were compared with those working in large reputed organisations. (...)
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  84.  10
    Temporal Spaces of Egalitarianism: The Ethical Negation of Economic Inequality in an Ephemeral Religious Organization.Ateeq A. Rauf & Ajnesh Prasad - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (3):699-718.
    In this article, we illuminate how a consumption practice in an ephemeral religious organization subverts systems of economic inequality that otherwise prevail in, and structure, society. Drawing on a rich ethnographic study in Pakistan, we show how the practice of food consumption in the Tablighi Jamaat —an Islamic organization originating in South Asia that is practiced intermittently by its followers—represents temporal spaces of egalitarianism. Within these temporal spaces, entrenched economic hierarchies that are salient in organizing Pakistani society are challenged. We (...)
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  85.  5
    Boiling the Frog Slowly: The Immersion of C-Suite Financial Executives Into Fraud.Ikseon Suh, John T. Sweeney, Kristina Linke & Joseph M. Wall - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (3):645-673.
    This study explores how financial executives retrospectively account for their crossing the line into financial statement fraud while acting within or reacting to a financialized corporate environment. We conduct our investigation through face-to-face interviews with 13 former C-suite financial executives who were involved in and indicted for major cases of accounting fraud. Five different themes of accounts emerged from the narratives, characterizing executives’ fraud immersion as a meaning-making process by which the particulars of the proximal social context and individual motivations (...)
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  86.  6
    ‘Consuming Good’ on Social Media: What Can Conspicuous Virtue Signalling on Facebook Tell Us About Prosocial and Unethical Intentions?Elaine Wallace, Isabel Buil & Leslie de Chernatony - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (3):577-592.
    Mentioning products or brands on Facebook enables individuals to display an ideal self to others through a form of virtual conspicuous consumption. Drawing on conspicuous donation behaviour literature, we investigate ‘conspicuous virtue signalling’, as conspicuous consumption on Facebook. CVS occurs when an individual mentions a charity on their Facebook profile. We investigate need for uniqueness and attention to social comparison information as antecedents of two types of CVS–self-oriented and other-oriented. We also explore the relationship between CVS and self-esteem, and offline (...)
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  87.  6
    Emerging Roles of Lead Buyer Governance for Sustainability Across Global Production Networks.Rachel Alexander - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (2):269-290.
    Global production networks connect multiple producers involved in fragmented manufacturing processes. Major brands and retailers, considered as lead firms, are under increasing pressure to ensure products made through GPNs are produced sustainably. Theories of governance developed to understand dynamics in outsourced production can provide insight into this issue. However, these theories and related empirical research have often focused on relationships between lead firms and upper-tier suppliers. When manufacturing involves multiple fragmented stages, understanding the role of lead firms becomes more difficult. (...)
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  88.  10
    Emerging Paradigms of Corporate Social Responsibility, Regulation, and Governance: Introduction to the Thematic Symposium.Bimal Arora, Arno Kourula & Robert Phillips - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (2):265-268.
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  89.  6
    Hybrid Production Regimes and Labor Agency in Transnational Private Governance.Jean-Christophe Graz, Nicole Helmerich & Cécile Prébandier - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (2):307-321.
    Little consensus exists about the effectiveness of transnational private governance in domains such as labor, the environment, or human rights. The paper builds on recent scholarship on labor standards to emphasize the role of labor agency in transnational private governance. It argues that the relationship between transnational private regulatory initiatives and labor agency depends on three competences: first, the ability of workers’ organizations to gain access to processes of employment regulation, implementation, and monitoring; second, their ability to insist on the (...)
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  90.  16
    Mandatory Non-Financial Disclosure and Its Influence on CSR: An International Comparison.Gregory Jackson, Julia Bartosch, Emma Avetisyan, Daniel Kinderman & Jette Steen Knudsen - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (2):323-342.
    The article examines the effects of non-financial disclosure on corporate social responsibility. We conceptualise trade-offs between two ideal types in relation to CSR. Whereas self-regulation is associated with greater flexibility for businesses to develop best practices, it can also lead to complacency if firms feel no external pressure to engage with CSR. In contrast, government regulation is associated with greater stringency around minimum standards, but can also result in rigidity owing to a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach. Given these potential trade-offs, we ask (...)
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  91.  11
    Employee Volunteer Programs are Associated with Firm-Level Benefits and CEO Incentives: Data on the Ethical Dilemma of Corporate Social Responsibility Activities.Brian D. Knox - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (2):449-472.
    Ethical dilemmas arise when one must decide between conflicting ethical imperatives. One potential ethical dilemma is a manager’s decision of whether to engage in corporate social responsibility activities. This decision could pit the ethical imperative of honoring unwritten obligations to society against the ethical imperative of honoring contractual obligations to the firm. However, CSR activities might only be a minor ethical dilemma or none at all if they simultaneously benefit the firm and society. To examine this I test the association (...)
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  92.  13
    Inclusive Business at the Base of the Pyramid: The Role of Embeddedness for Enabling Social Innovations.Addisu A. Lashitew, Lydia Bals & Rob van Tulder - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (2):421-448.
    Inclusive businesses that combine profit making with social impact are claimed to hold the potential for poverty alleviation while also creating new entrepreneurial and innovation opportunities. Current research, however, offers little insight on the processes through which for-profit business organizations introduce social innovations that can profitably create social impact. To understand how social innovations emerge and become sustained in business organizations, we studied a telecom firm in Kenya that successfully extended financial services across the country through a number of mobile (...)
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  93.  10
    No-Size-Fits-All: Collaborative Governance as an Alternative for Addressing Labour Issues in Global Supply Chains.Sun Hye Lee, Kamel Mellahi, Michael J. Mol & Vijay Pereira - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (2):291-305.
    Labour issues in global supply chains have been a thorny problem for both buyer firms and their suppliers. Research initially focused mostly on the bilateral relationship between buyer firms and suppliers, looking at arm’s-length and close collaboration modes, and the associated mechanisms of coercion and cooperation. Yet continuing problems in the global supply chain suggest that neither governance type offers a comprehensive solution to the problem. This study investigates collaborative governance, an alternative governance type that is driven by buyer firms (...)
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  94.  2
    When Workplace Unionism in Global Value Chains Does Not Function Well: Exploring the Impediments.Céline Louche, Lotte Staelens & Marijke D’Haese - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (2):379-398.
    Improving working conditions at the bottom of global value chains has become a central issue in our global economy. In this battle, trade unionism has been presented as a way for workers to make their voices heard. Therefore, it is strongly promoted by most social standards. However, establishing a well-functioning trade union is not as obvious as it may seem. Using a comparative case study approach, we examine impediments to farm-level unionism in the cut flower industry in Ethiopia. For this (...)
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  95.  6
    Evaluating the Double Bottom-Line of Social Banking in an Emerging Country: How Efficient are Public Banks in Supporting Priority and Non-priority Sectors in India?Almudena Martínez-Campillo, Mahinda Wijesiri & Peter Wanke - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (2):399-420.
    India is the emerging country with the world’s greatest social banking program, so Indian banks are required to finance the weaker sectors of society that are excluded from the traditional financial system, while also providing mainstream banking services to non-priority sectors. For social banks to promote the ethical–social management of their dual mission and to be successful in today’s business environment, they must be as efficient as possible in both dimensions of their banking activity. Whereas the efficiency of Indian banks (...)
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  96.  11
    Speaking Truth to Power: Twitter Reactions to the Panama Papers.Dean Neu, Gregory Saxton, Jeffery Everett & Abu Rahaman Shiraz - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (2):473-485.
    The current study examines the micro-linguistic details of Twitter responses to the whistleblower-initiated publication of the Panama Papers. The leaked documents contained the micro-details of tax avoidance, tax evasion, and wealth accumulation schemes used by business elites, politicians, and government bureaucrats. The public release of the documents on April 4, 2016 resulted in a groundswell of Twitter and other social media activity throughout the world, including 161,036 Spanish-language tweets in the subsequent 5-month period. The findings illustrate that the responses were (...)
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  97.  14
    Safety-Related Moral Disengagement in Response to Job Insecurity: Counterintuitive Effects of Perceived Organizational and Supervisor Support.Tahira M. Probst, Laura Petitta, Claudio Barbaranelli & Christopher Austin - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (2):343-358.
    The purpose of this study was to examine individual and organizational antecedents and consequences of safety-related moral disengagement. Using Conservation of Resources theory, social exchange theory, and psychological contract breach as a theoretical foundation, this study tested the proposition that higher job insecurity is associated with greater levels of subsequent safety-related moral disengagement, which in turn is related to reduced safety performance. Moreover, we examined whether perceived organizational and supervisor support buffered or intensified the impact of job insecurity on moral (...)
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  98.  9
    Business Strategy and Corporate Social Responsibility.Yuan Yuan, Louise Yi Lu, Gaoliang Tian & Yangxin Yu - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (2):359-377.
    This study examines the relation between a firm’s business strategy and its corporate social responsibility performance. Using a comprehensive measure of business strategy based on the Miles and Snow theoretical framework, we find that firms following an innovation-oriented strategy are associated with better CSR performance than those following an efficiency-oriented strategy. Specifically, compared with defenders, prospectors engage in more socially responsible activities, fewer socially irresponsible activities, and perform better in both stakeholder- and third-party-related CSR areas. Taken together, our results suggest (...)
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  99.  6
    A Multifocal and Integrative View of the Influencers of Ethical Attitudes Using Qualitative Configurational Analysis.Nicole A. Celestine, Catherine Leighton & Chris Perryer - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (1):103-122.
    Ethical attitudes and behaviour are complex. This complexity extends to the influencers operating at different levels both outside and within the organisation, and in different combinations for different individuals. There is hence a growing need to understand the proximal and distal influencers of ethical attitudes, and how these operate in concert at the individual, organisational, and societal levels. Few studies have attempted to combine these main research streams and systematically examine their combined impact. The minority of studies that have taken (...)
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  100.  8
    Institutional Theory and Evolution of ‘A Legitimate’ Compliance Culture: The Case of the UK Financial Service Sector.Wendy Mason Burdon & Mohamed Karim Sorour - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (1):47-80.
    Over the last decade, scandals within the UK Financial Service sector have impacted their legitimacy and raised questions whether a compliance culture exists or not. Several institutional changes at the regulatory and normative levels have targeted stakeholders’ concerns regarding compliance culture and led to changes in the legitimation process. This paper attempts to address a gap in the literature by asking the following question: How is the UK financial institutions’ compliance culture shaped by the institutional environment and changing legitimacy claims? (...)
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  101.  15
    Do LGBT-Supportive Corporate Policies Improve Credit Ratings? An Instrumental-Variable Analysis.Pandej Chintrakarn, Sirimon Treepongkaruna, Pornsit Jiraporn & Sang Mook Lee - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (1):31-45.
    We investigate the effect of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender -supportive corporate policies on credit ratings. To the extent that LGBT-friendly policies are beneficial to the firm and therefore improve its expected cash flows, credit rating agencies should assign more favorable credit ratings to the firm. To alleviate endogeneity concerns, we exploit the variations in the LGBT populations across the states in the U.S. as our instrument. Our instrumental-variable analysis reveals that firms that adopt LGBT-supportive corporate policies enjoy better credit (...)
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  102.  26
    Intergroup Conflict is Our Business: CEOs’ Ethical Intergroup Leadership Fuels Stakeholder Support for Corporate Intergroup Responsibility.Nir Halevy, Sora Jun & Eileen Y. Chou - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (1):229-246.
    Is reducing large-scale intergroup conflict the business of corporations? Although large corporations can use their power and prominence to reduce intergroup conflict in society, it is unclear to what extent stakeholders support corporate Intergroup Responsibility. Study 1 showed that support for CIR correlates in theoretically meaningful ways with relevant economic, social, and moral attitudes, including fair market ideology, consumer support for corporate social responsibility, social dominance orientation, symbolic racism, and moral foundations. Studies 2 and 3 employed experimental designs to test (...)
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  103.  10
    Correction To: The Synergistic Effect of Descriptive and Injunctive Norm Perceptions on Counterproductive Work Behaviors.Ryan P. Jacobson, Lisa A. Marchiondo, Kathryn J. L. Jacobson & Jacqueline N. Hood - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (1):211-211.
    The name of the third author was incomplete in the initial online publication. The original article has been corrected.
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  104.  6
    The Synergistic Effect of Descriptive and Injunctive Norm Perceptions on Counterproductive Work Behaviors.Ryan P. Jacobson, Lisa A. Marchiondo, Kathryn J. L. Jacobson & Jacqueline N. Hood - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (1):191-209.
    This paper addresses the potentially interactive effects of descriptive and injunctive norm perceptions on an unethical workplace behavior: counterproductive work behavior perpetration. We draw on the Focus Theory of Normative Conduct and its conceptual distinction between norm types to refine research on this topic. We also test a person-by-environment interaction to determine whether the interactive effects of these norms for CWB are enhanced among employees reporting a stronger need to belong to social groups. In two studies, predictors were assessed in (...)
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  105.  5
    Correction to: Winning at a Losing Game? Side-Effects of Perceived Tournament Promotion Incentives in Audit Firms.Jorien L. Pruijssers, Pursey P. M. A. R. Heugens & J. Van Oosterhout - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (1):169-169.
    The name of the third author was incorrect in the initial online publication. The original article has been corrected.
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  106.  9
    Winning at a Losing Game? Side-Effects of Perceived Tournament Promotion Incentives in Audit Firms.Jorien L. Pruijssers, Pursey P. M. A. R. Heugens & J. Van Oosterhout - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (1):149-167.
    Tournament-like promotion systems are the default in audit firms, which are generally internally owned professional partnerships. While awarding promotions in a contest-like fashion stimulates contestants’ motivation and productivity, it may also upset an organizations’ ethical climate and trigger ethically adverse behaviors. Since nearly all research on promotion tournaments in management has been conducted in public firms, little is known about how these incentive systems operate in professional partnerships. In this study, we analyze how the perception of the two controllable design (...)
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  107.  6
    Winning at a Losing Game? Side-Effects of Perceived Tournament Promotion Incentives in Audit Firms.Jorien L. Pruijssers, Pursey P. M. A. R. Heugens & J. Van Oosterhout - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (1):149-167.
    Tournament-like promotion systems are the default in audit firms, which are generally internally owned professional partnerships. While awarding promotions in a contest-like fashion stimulates contestants’ motivation and productivity, it may also upset an organizations’ ethical climate and trigger ethically adverse behaviors. Since nearly all research on promotion tournaments in management has been conducted in public firms, little is known about how these incentive systems operate in professional partnerships. In this study, we analyze how the perception of the two controllable design (...)
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  108.  12
    The Impact of Culture on Corruption, Gross Domestic Product, and Human Development.Wolfgang Scholl & Carsten C. Schermuly - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (1):171-189.
    The evidence of culture’s impact on corruption and its consequences is still inconclusive despite several investigations: Sometimes, theory is lacking and causes and consequences seem exchangeable. Based on psychological research on the distribution and use of power, we predicted that a steeper distribution of power induces more corruption and elaborated its negative consequences in a complex causal model. For measuring power distribution, pervading national culture, we augmented Hofstede’s ‘Power Distance’ with three additional indicators into a reversed, more reliable and valid (...)
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  109.  7
    Manifold Conceptions of the Internal Auditing of Risk Culture in the Financial Sector.Vikash Kumar Sinha & Marika Arena - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (1):81-102.
    This exploratory study investigates the manifold conceptions of the internal auditing of risk culture prevalent among four influential actors of the financial sector—regulators, normalizers, consultants, and implementers. By inductive analysis of 20 interviews and 295 documents, we illustrate a two-step interpretive scheme utilized by the four actors in their IA approaches of risk culture: defining broad goals and designing visibility schemes. The visibility schemes were tied to the demarcation, measurement, as well as the IA data collection techniques of risk culture. (...)
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  110.  16
    Prosocial Compensation Following a Service Failure: Fulfilling an Organization’s Ethical and Philanthropic Responsibilities.Jean-Pierre Thomassen, Marijke C. Leliveld, Kees Ahaus & Steven Van de Walle - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (1):123-147.
    Prosocial compensation is a corporate social responsibility practice that involves donating money to a charitable cause on behalf of customers as a means to compensate them for their loss after a service failure. In order to determine the effectiveness of PC, we carried out three experiments while also comparing its effectiveness within private and public settings. Experiment 1 focused on the signaling effects of communicating the promise to offer PC to potential customers in the event of service failure. Results show (...)
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  111.  13
    Family Responsibility Discrimination, Power Distance, and Emotional Exhaustion: When and Why Are There Gender Differences in Work–Life Conflict?Tiffany Trzebiatowski & María del Carmen Triana - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (1):15-29.
    As men take on more family responsibilities over time, with women still shouldering considerably more childcare and housework, an important ethical matter facing organizations is that of providing a supportive environment to foster employee well-being and balance between work and family. Using conservation of resources theory, this multi-source study examines the association between perceived family responsibility discrimination and work–life conflict as mediated by emotional exhaustion. Employee gender and power distance values are tested as moderators of the perceived family responsibility discrimination (...)
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  112.  10
    Resource Depletion Perspective on the Link Between Abusive Supervision and Safety Behaviors.Xiao Yuan, Yaoshan Xu & Yongjuan Li - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (1):213-228.
    Leader behavior significantly influences employees’ safety performance. This study aimed to examine the effect of abusive supervision on the safety behaviors of subordinates. By drawing on the strength model of self-control, we predicted that abusive supervision would negatively affect safety behaviors through emotional exhaustion, and trait self-control and attentional bias toward safety would moderate the relationship between abusive supervision, emotional exhaustion, and safety behaviors. Our hypothesized model was supported by results from a sample of 159 workers at a chemical product (...)
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  113.  43
    NGO-Led Organizing and Pakistan’s Homeworkers: A Materialist Feminist Analysis of Collective Agency.Ghazal Mir Zulfiqar & Maheen Khan - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (1):1-14.
    The expropriation of marginalized women’s labor is a key issue in business ethics in these times of global outsourcing and informal work arrangements. This has led to a transnational advocacy movement for securing the labor rights of homeworkers, who are poor women working on piece-rate contracts out of their homes. Drawing on materialist feminism, our paper critically explores the homeworker network in Pakistan, that was set up as part of a global push by international institutions and networks to localize the (...)
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  114.  9
    Review of Give People Money: How a Basic Income Would End Poverty, Revolutionize Work, and Remake the World by Annie Lowrey: Crown, 2018, 272 Pp., ISBN: 978-1524758769. [REVIEW]Matt Zwolinski - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (1):247-249.
  115.  4
    Business Ethics in Africa: The Role of Institutional Context, Social Relevance, and Development Challenges.Ifedapo Adeleye, John Luiz, Judy Muthuri & Kenneth Amaeshi - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (4):717-729.
    Business ethics in Africa, as a field of research, practice, and teaching, has grown rapidly over the last two decades or so, covering a wide variety of topical issues, including corporate social responsibility, governance, and social entrepreneurship. Building on this progress, and to further advance the field, this special issue addresses four broad areas that cover important, under-researched or newly emerging phenomena in Africa: culture, ethics and leadership; business, society and institutions; corruption, anti-corruption and governance; and philanthropy, social entrepreneurship and (...)
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  116.  2
    A Model of Virtuous Leadership in Africa: Case Study of a Nigerian Firm.Adeyinka Adewale - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (4):749-762.
    The nature and extent of Africa’s leadership challenge has been explored from multi-theoretical perspectives finding that amongst other issues, it is ethical in nature. This study therefore aimed to investigate and present a model of virtuous leadership within an indigenous African firm’s context drawing from the African virtue ethics of Afro-communitarianism. Using a qualitative case study design, it explored a model of virtuous leadership within a leading Nigerian pharmaceutical brand. Data was collected from multiple primary sources including semi-structured interviews and (...)
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  117.  3
    Afrocentric Attitudinal Reciprocity and Social Expectations of Employees: The Role of Employee-Centred CSR in Africa.Oluseyi Aju & Eshani Beddewela - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (4):763-781.
    In view of the limited consideration for Afrocentric perspectives in organisational ethics literature, we examine Employee-Centred Corporate Social Responsibility from the perspective of Afrocentric employees’ social expectations. We posit that Afrocentric employees’ social expectations and the organisational practices for addressing these expectations differ from conventional conceptualisation. By focusing specifically upon the psychological attributes evolving from the fulfilment of employees’ social expectations, we argue that Afrocentric socio-cultural factors could influence perceived organisational support and perceived employee cynicism. We further draw upon social (...)
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  118.  4
    Ethical Judgments About Social Entrepreneurship in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Influence of Spatio-Cultural Meanings.Maria Margarida De Avillez, Andrew Greenman & Susan Marlow - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (4):877-892.
    Within this paper, we adopt a qualitative process approach to explore how ethical judgments are influenced by spatio-cultural meanings applied to social entrepreneurship in the context of Mozambique. We analyse how such ethical judgments emerged using data gathered over a 4 year period in Maputo. Our findings illustrate three modes used to inform ethical judgments: embracing, rejecting and integrating. These describe how ethical judgments transpire as participants evaluate social entrepreneurship drawing upon related global normative meanings and those embedded within the (...)
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  119.  3
    Protecting Environment or People? Pitfalls and Merits of Informal Labour in the Congolese Recycling Industry.Clément Longondjo Etambakonga & Julia Roloff - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (4):815-834.
    Despite the fact that informal labour is a widespread phenomenon, the business ethics literature tends to describe it as a problem that needs to be overcome, rather than contemplating its merits. Informal labour is linked to poor working conditions, low-income and insufficient protection. However, it is also a survival strategy and upholds essential services, such as waste collection and recycling. Through the lens of postmodern ethics, we analyse 45 interviews with formal and informal waste management workers in Kinshasa. The study (...)
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  120.  1
    Strategic Responses to Grand Challenges: Why and How Corporations Build Community Resilience.Ralph Hamann, Lulamile Makaula, Gina Ziervogel, Clifford Shearing & Alan Zhang - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (4):835-853.
    We explore why and how corporations seek to build community resilience as a strategic response to grand challenges. Based on a comparative case study analysis of four corporations strategically building community resilience in five place-based communities in South Africa, as well as three counterfactual cases, we develop a process model of corporate practices and contingent factors that explain why and how some corporations commit to community resilience building and whether they try to do so directly or indirectly. We thus help (...)
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  121.  3
    Corporate Political Strategies in Weak Institutional Environments: A Break from Conventions.Tahiru Azaaviele Liedong, Daniel Aghanya & Tazeeb Rajwani - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (4):855-876.
    There is a lack of research about the political strategies used by firms in emerging countries, mainly because the literature often assumes that Western-oriented corporate political activity has universal application. Drawing on resource-dependency logics, we explore why and how firms orchestrate CPA in the institutionally challenging context of Nigeria. Our findings show that firms deploy four context-fitting but ethically suspect political strategies: affective, financial, pseudo-attribution and kinship strategies. We leverage this understanding to contribute to CPA in emerging countries by arguing (...)
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  122.  2
    This Time From Africa: Developing a Relational Approach to Values-Driven Leadership.Mar Pérezts, Jo-Anna Russon & Mollie Painter - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (4):731-748.
    The importance of relationality in ethical leadership has been the focus of recent attention in business ethics scholarship. However, this relational component has not been sufficiently theorized from different philosophical perspectives, allowing specific Western philosophical conceptions to dominate the leadership development literature. This paper offers a theoretical analysis of the relational ontology that informs various conceptualizations of selfhood from both African and Western philosophical traditions and unpacks its implications for values-driven leadership. We aim to broaden Western conceptions of leadership development (...)
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  123.  2
    Benevolence and Negative Deviant Behavior in Africa: The Moderating Role of Centralization.David B. Zoogah & Richard Bawulenbeug Zoogah - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (4):783-813.
    The growing interest in Africa as well as concerns about negative deviant behaviors and ethnic structures necessitates examination of the effect of ethnic expectations on behavior of employees. In this study we leverage insight from ethnos oblige theory to propose that centralization of ethnic norms moderates the relationship between benevolence expectations and negative deviant behavior. Using a cross-sectional design and data from two countries as well as moderation and cross-cultural analytic techniques, we find support for three-way interactions where the relationship (...)
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  124. Review of Review Reclaiming the System: Moral Responsibility, Divided Labour, and the Role of Organizations in Society by Lisa Herzog: Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2018, 326 Pp. [REVIEW]Caleb Bernacchio - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (3):707-710.
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  125.  1
    Review of The Quality of Life and Policy Issues Among the Middle East and North African Countries by El Syed Al Aswad: Springer International Publishing, New York, 2019, XXIV, 143 Pp, ISBN: 978-3-030-00325-8. [REVIEW]Saqib Hussain & Rida Ali Khan - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (3):713-715.
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  126.  4
    Review of Aquinas and the Market. Toward a Humane Economy by Mary L. Hirschfeld: Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA & London, England, 2018, 268 Pp. [REVIEW]Alejo José G. Sison - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (3):711-712.
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  127.  7
    How Do Consumers Reconcile Positive and Negative CSR-Related Information to Form an Ethical Brand Perception? A Mixed Method Inquiry.Katja H. Brunk & Cara de Boer - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (2):443-458.
    This research investigates how consumers’ ethical brand perceptions are affected by differentially valenced information. Drawing on literature from person-perception formation and using a sequential, mixed method design comprising qualitative interviews and two experiments with a national representative population sample, our findings show that only when consumers perceive their judgment of a brand’s ethicality to be pertinent, do they process information holistically and in line with the configural model of impression formation. In this case, negative information functions as a diagnostic cue (...)
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  128.  25
    Entrepreneurship and Ethics in the Sharing Economy: A Critical Perspective.Mujtaba Ahsan - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):19-33.
    The advent of the sharing/gig economy has created new forms of employment embedded in new labor practices. Advocates of the sharing economy frame it in salutary terms, lauding its sustainability, decentralization, and employment-generation capabilities. The workers of the gig economy are seen as independent contractors under law rather than employees, and the owners of the gig economy platforms celebrate this categorization as a form of entrepreneurship. In this paper, we use insights from the entrepreneurship literature to examine this claim critically. (...)
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  129.  5
    Entrepreneurship and Ethics in the Sharing Economy: A Critical Perspective.Mujtaba Ahsan - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):19-33.
    The advent of the sharing/gig economy has created new forms of employment embedded in new labor practices. Advocates of the sharing economy frame it in salutary terms, lauding its sustainability, decentralization, and employment-generation capabilities. The workers of the gig economy are seen as independent contractors under law rather than employees, and the owners of the gig economy platforms celebrate this categorization as a form of entrepreneurship. In this paper, we use insights from the entrepreneurship literature to examine this claim critically. (...)
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  130.  5
    Dynamics of Lending-Based Prosocial Crowdfunding: Using a Social Responsibility Lens.John P. Berns, Maria Figueroa-Armijos, Serge P. Da Motta Veiga & Timothy C. Dunne - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):169-185.
    Crowdfunding platforms have revolutionized entrepreneurial finance, with 200 billion dollars expected to be dispersed annually to entrepreneurs and small business owners by 2020. Despite the importance of this growing phenomenon, our knowledge of the dynamics of successful lending-based prosocial crowdfunding and its implications for the business ethics literature remain limited. We use a social responsibility lens to examine whether crowdfunders on a lending-based prosocial platform lend their money based on altruistic or strategic motives. Our results indicate that the dynamics of (...)
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  131.  1
    Dynamics of Lending-Based Prosocial Crowdfunding: Using a Social Responsibility Lens.John P. Berns, Maria Figueroa-Armijos, Serge P. Da Motta Veiga & Timothy C. Dunne - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):169-185.
    Crowdfunding platforms have revolutionized entrepreneurial finance, with 200 billion dollars expected to be dispersed annually to entrepreneurs and small business owners by 2020. Despite the importance of this growing phenomenon, our knowledge of the dynamics of successful lending-based prosocial crowdfunding and its implications for the business ethics literature remain limited. We use a social responsibility lens to examine whether crowdfunders on a lending-based prosocial platform lend their money based on altruistic or strategic motives. Our results indicate that the dynamics of (...)
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  132.  17
    Religion and the Method of Earnings Management: Evidence From China.Guilong Cai, Wenfei Li & Zhenyang Tang - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):71-90.
    Previous studies argue that religious firms are more ethical and thus engage less in accrual earnings management. At odds with the ethical view, we use a sample of Chinese listed firms and show that firms in religious regions use more real earnings management. We postulate that besides ethics, religion also proxies for risk aversion, which motivates firms to substitute accrual earnings management with real earnings management. Consistent with this view, we show that the positive association between religiosity and real earnings (...)
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  133.  1
    Religion and the Method of Earnings Management: Evidence from China.Guilong Cai, Wenfei Li & Zhenyang Tang - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):71-90.
    Previous studies argue that religious firms are more ethical and thus engage less in accrual earnings management. At odds with the ethical view, we use a sample of Chinese listed firms and show that firms in religious regions use more real earnings management. We postulate that besides ethics, religion also proxies for risk aversion, which motivates firms to substitute accrual earnings management with real earnings management. Consistent with this view, we show that the positive association between religiosity and real earnings (...)
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  134.  8
    ‘Business Unusual’: Building BoP 3.0.Danielle A. Chmielewski, Krzysztof Dembek & Jennifer R. Beckett - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):211-229.
    With over three billion people currently living below the poverty line, finding better ways to lift people out of poverty is a concern of scholars from a range of disciplines. Within Management Studies, the focus is on developing market-based solutions to poverty alleviation through Bottom/Base-of-the-Pyramid initiatives. To date, these have enjoyed limited success, sometimes even exacerbating the problems they attempt to solve. As a result, there is a growing academic and practitioner push for a third iteration—BoP 3.0—that moves closer to (...)
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  135.  3
    ‘Business Unusual’: Building BoP 3.0.Danielle A. Chmielewski, Krzysztof Dembek & Jennifer R. Beckett - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):211-229.
    With over three billion people currently living below the poverty line, finding better ways to lift people out of poverty is a concern of scholars from a range of disciplines. Within Management Studies, the focus is on developing market-based solutions to poverty alleviation through Bottom/Base-of-the-Pyramid initiatives. To date, these have enjoyed limited success, sometimes even exacerbating the problems they attempt to solve. As a result, there is a growing academic and practitioner push for a third iteration—BoP 3.0—that moves closer to (...)
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  136.  9
    Apology, Restitution, and Forgiveness After Psychological Contract Breach.Nicholas DiFonzo, Anthony Alongi & Paul Wiele - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):53-69.
    Using forgiveness theory, we investigated the effects of organizational apology and restitution on eliciting forgiveness of a transgressing organization after transactional psychological contract breach. Forgiveness theory proposes that victims are more likely to forgive offenders when victims’ positive offender-oriented emotions replace negative ones. Three pre-post laboratory experiments, using vignettes about a broken promise of financial aid, found that while apology-alone and restitution-alone each increased likelihood of forgiving, restitution-alone was the more effective of the two responses. When combined with an apology, (...)
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  137.  1
    Apology, Restitution, and Forgiveness After Psychological Contract Breach.Nicholas DiFonzo, Anthony Alongi & Paul Wiele - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):53-69.
    Using forgiveness theory, we investigated the effects of organizational apology and restitution on eliciting forgiveness of a transgressing organization after transactional psychological contract breach. Forgiveness theory proposes that victims are more likely to forgive offenders when victims’ positive offender-oriented emotions replace negative ones. Three pre-post laboratory experiments, using vignettes about a broken promise of financial aid, found that while apology-alone and restitution-alone each increased likelihood of forgiving, restitution-alone was the more effective of the two responses. When combined with an apology, (...)
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  138.  2
    Review of The Ethical Professor: A Practical Guide to Research, Teaching, and Professional Life, by Lorraine Eden, Kathy Lund Dean, and Paul M. Vaaler: New York: Routledge, 2018, 233 Pp., ISBN 978-1-138-48598-3. [REVIEW]Wayne Eastman - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):235-236.
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  139.  1
    Review of The Ethical Professor: A Practical Guide to Research, Teaching, and Professional Life, by Lorraine Eden, Kathy Lund Dean, and Paul M. Vaaler: New York: Routledge, 2018, 233 Pp., ISBN 978-1-138-48598-3. [REVIEW]Wayne Eastman - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):235-236.
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  140. Review of The Ethical Professor: A Practical Guide to Research, Teaching, and Professional Life, by Lorraine Eden, Kathy Lund Dean, and Paul M. Vaaler: New York: Routledge, 2018, 233 pp., ISBN 978-1-138-48598-3. [REVIEW]Wayne Eastman - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):235-236.
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  141.  5
    Deepening Methods in Business Ethics.R. Edward Freeman & Michelle Greenwood - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):1-3.
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  142. Deepening Methods in Business Ethics.R. Edward Freeman & Michelle Greenwood - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):1-3.
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  143.  2
    When Government Contractors May or May Not Spend Money On Political Speech.Daniel M. Isaacs - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):91-102.
    Some leading economists maintain that corporate managers have no social responsibilities other than to maximize profits and obey the law. To support that thesis, they rely, in part, on the agency theory of the firm. The theory provides that managers are agents of shareholders and must do what shareholders want, which is generally to make as much money as possible. For purposes of this article, I accept that managers are agents of shareholders, but I reject the conclusion that the relationship (...)
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  144.  13
    Narrative Worlds of Frugal Consumers: Unmasking Romanticized Spirituality to Reveal Responsibilization and De-Politicization.Srinath Jagannathan, Anupam Bawa & Rajnish Rai - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):149-168.
    Extant literature romanticizes frugality as a lifestyle trait that helps in the spiritual evolution of consumers, which in turn enables them in overcoming the negative consequences of materialism and over-consumption. Extant studies have not paid attention to cultural contexts, such as caste and gender, which could outline the non-volitional enactment of frugality in societies such as India. We draw from the work of the political philosopher Alain Badiou to argue that frugality embodies non-volitional subjectivities and is linked to processes of (...)
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  145.  1
    Narrative Worlds of Frugal Consumers: Unmasking Romanticized Spirituality to Reveal Responsibilization and De-politicization.Srinath Jagannathan, Anupam Bawa & Rajnish Rai - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):149-168.
    Extant literature romanticizes frugality as a lifestyle trait that helps in the spiritual evolution of consumers, which in turn enables them in overcoming the negative consequences of materialism and over-consumption. Extant studies have not paid attention to cultural contexts, such as caste and gender, which could outline the non-volitional enactment of frugality in societies such as India. We draw from the work of the political philosopher Alain Badiou to argue that frugality embodies non-volitional subjectivities and is linked to processes of (...)
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  146.  6
    Halloween, Organization, and the Ethics of Uncanny Celebration.Simon Kelly & Kathleen Riach - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):103-114.
    This article examines the relationship between organizational ethics, the uncanny, and the annual celebration of Halloween. We begin by exploring the traditional and contemporary organizational function of Halloween as ‘tension-management ritual’ :44–59, 2000) through which collective fears, anxieties, and fantasies are played out and given material expression. Combining the uncanny with the folkloric concept of ostension, we then examine an incident in which UK supermarket retailers made national news headlines for selling offensive Halloween costumes depicting ‘escaped mental patients’. Rather than (...)
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  147.  2
    Halloween, Organization, and the Ethics of Uncanny Celebration.Simon Kelly & Kathleen Riach - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):103-114.
    This article examines the relationship between organizational ethics, the uncanny, and the annual celebration of Halloween. We begin by exploring the traditional and contemporary organizational function of Halloween as ‘tension-management ritual’ :44–59, 2000) through which collective fears, anxieties, and fantasies are played out and given material expression. Combining the uncanny with the folkloric concept of ostension, we then examine an incident in which UK supermarket retailers made national news headlines for selling offensive Halloween costumes depicting ‘escaped mental patients’. Rather than (...)
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  148.  5
    Review of Humans and Machines at Work: Monitoring, Surveillance, and Automation in Contemporary Capitalism by Phoebe V. Moore, Martin Upchurch, and Xanthe Whittaker. [REVIEW]Swatee B. Kulkarni - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):237-241.
    This book is a collection of essays written by various authors including the editors of the collection, Phoebe V. Moore, Martin Upchurch, and Xanthe Whittaker. These essays deal with the current topics of monitoring of workers in the new gig economy, digitalization of the work, and use of big data for the restructuring of the workforce. This book examines how new forms of surveillance are being adopted into contemporary work. It draws from original empirical research engaging with existing and emerging (...)
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  149.  1
    Review of Humans and Machines at Work: Monitoring, Surveillance, and Automation in Contemporary Capitalism by Phoebe V. Moore, Martin Upchurch, and Xanthe Whittaker. [REVIEW]Swatee B. Kulkarni - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):237-241.
    This book is a collection of essays written by various authors including the editors of the collection, Phoebe V. Moore, Martin Upchurch, and Xanthe Whittaker. These essays deal with the current topics of monitoring of workers in the new gig economy, digitalization of the work, and use of big data for the restructuring of the workforce. This book examines how new forms of surveillance are being adopted into contemporary work. It draws from original empirical research engaging with existing and emerging (...)
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  150.  11
    The Effect of Fairness, Responsible Leadership and Worthy Work on Multiple Dimensions of Meaningful Work.Marjolein Lips-Wiersma, Jarrod Haar & Sarah Wright - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):35-52.
    The present study extends the meaningful work and ethics literature by comparing three ethics-related antecedents. The second contribution of this paper is that in using a multi-dimensional MFW construct we offer a more fine-tuned understanding of the impact of ethical antecedents on different dimensions of MFW, such as expressing full potential and integrity with self. Using an international data set from 879 employees and structural equation modelling, we confirmed an updated seven-dimension Comprehensive Meaningful Work Scale. The structural model found that (...)
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  151.  1
    The Effect of Fairness, Responsible Leadership and Worthy Work on Multiple Dimensions of Meaningful Work.Marjolein Lips-Wiersma, Jarrod Haar & Sarah Wright - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):35-52.
    The present study extends the meaningful work and ethics literature by comparing three ethics-related antecedents. The second contribution of this paper is that in using a multi-dimensional MFW construct we offer a more fine-tuned understanding of the impact of ethical antecedents on different dimensions of MFW, such as expressing full potential and integrity with self. Using an international data set from 879 employees and structural equation modelling, we confirmed an updated seven-dimension Comprehensive Meaningful Work Scale. The structural model found that (...)
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  152.  17
    The Ethical Standards of Judgment Questionnaire: Development and Validation of Independent Measures of Formalism and Consequentialism.Ed Love, Tara Ceranic Salinas & Jeff D. Rotman - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):115-132.
    The ethical frameworks of consequentialism and formalism predict moral awareness and behavior in individuals, but current measures either do not treat these frameworks as independent or lack sufficient theoretical underpinnings and statistical dependability. This paper presents the development and validation of a new scale to measure consequentialism and formalism that is well grounded in prior research. The Ethical Standards of Judgement Questionnaire is validated via six studies. Measurement items are developed in the first three studies, which also confirm the need (...)
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  153. The Ethical Standards of Judgment Questionnaire: Development and Validation of Independent Measures of Formalism and Consequentialism.Ed Love, Tara Ceranic Salinas & Jeff D. Rotman - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):115-132.
    The ethical frameworks of consequentialism and formalism predict moral awareness and behavior in individuals, but current measures either do not treat these frameworks as independent or lack sufficient theoretical underpinnings and statistical dependability. This paper presents the development and validation of a new scale to measure consequentialism and formalism that is well grounded in prior research. The Ethical Standards of Judgement Questionnaire is validated via six studies. Measurement items are developed in the first three studies, which also confirm the need (...)
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  154.  12
    A Conceptual Model for Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility Assurance Practice.Warren Maroun - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):187-209.
    The prior research on different forms of what can be referred to as corporate social responsibility reporting is vast. As CSR reporting becomes more commonplace, the theoretical and empirical analysis of this type of reporting has matured and both academics and practitioners have begun to explore the possibility of having CSR disclosures assured. This paper makes an important contribution by synthesising the findings on emerging forms of CSR assurance practice. It summarises the ground covered to date and provides a comprehensive (...)
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  155.  2
    A Conceptual Model for Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility Assurance Practice.Warren Maroun - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):187-209.
    The prior research on different forms of what can be referred to as corporate social responsibility reporting is vast. As CSR reporting becomes more commonplace, the theoretical and empirical analysis of this type of reporting has matured and both academics and practitioners have begun to explore the possibility of having CSR disclosures assured. This paper makes an important contribution by synthesising the findings on emerging forms of CSR assurance practice. It summarises the ground covered to date and provides a comprehensive (...)
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  156.  10
    Does Ethical Judgment Determine the Decision to Become a Cyborg?: Influence of Ethical Judgment on the Cyborg Market.Jorge Pelegrín-Borondo, Mario Arias-Oliva, Kiyoshi Murata & Mar Souto-Romero - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):5-17.
    Today, technological implants to increase innate human capabilities are already available on the market. Cyborgs, understood as healthy people who decide to integrate their bodies with insideable technology, are no longer science fiction, but fact. The cyborg market will be a huge new business with important consequences for both industry and society. More specifically, cyborg technologies are a unique product, with a potentially critical impact on the future of humanity. In light of the potential transformations involved in the creation of (...)
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  157.  6
    Finding the Ethics of “Red Capitalists”: Political Connection and Philanthropy of Chinese Private Entrepreneurs.Yuan Yang & Min Tang - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (1):133-147.
    In China, many private entrepreneurs have obtained political offices in the government. In this study, we argue that Chinese private entrepreneurs who are formally connected with government institutions, compared to other Chinese private entrepreneurs, tend to contribute more to philanthropic causes not only for instrumental concerns but also out of altruistic values. We submit this argument to an empirical test through a secondary data analysis of a representative sample of Chinese entrepreneurs collected by a coalition of government and industry groups. (...)
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