Year:

  1.  3
    Corruption, Bribery and Innovation in CEE: Where is the Link?Doren Chadee, Banjo Roxas & Alexandre Kouznetsov - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (4):747-762.
    This study investigates the influence of formal and informal institutions on firm innovation in transitional economies of Central and Eastern Europe by explicitly differentiating between corruption and bribery as distinct informal institutions. We integrate institutional theory and legitimacy theory to explain that the failure of formal institutions creates an environment of corruption which encourages firms to use bribes to facilitate economic exchange. We test our hypotheses on the innovation performance of a sample of firms in 11 CEEs. The results show (...)
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  2. Corporate Social Responsibility in Liquid Times: The Case of Romania.Georgiana Grigore, Mike Molesworth, Andreea Vontea, Abdullah Hasan Basnawi, Ogeday Celep & Sylvian Patrick Jesudoss - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (4):763-782.
    Existing scholarly work on corporate social responsibility frequently emphasizes either normative/ethical claims about social progress or instrumental/strategic claims about corporate effectiveness, yet less often acknowledges the moral conditions of those undertaking CSR within a specific cultural context. In this paper, we draw attention to the social conditions in which CSR takes place and the related ethics of the subjects that must enact it. Our approach is to document the lived experiences of practitioners in Romania, a post-communist society. Drawing from fifty-three (...)
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  3.  1
    Inherited Scepticism and Neo-communist CSR-washing: Evidence from a Post-communist Society.Petya Koleva & Maureen Meadows - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (4):783-804.
    The sizeable theoretical and empirical literature on corporate social responsibility and business ethics in Western, developed economies indicates that the topic has attracted significant interest from academics and practitioners. There is, however, less evidence of the practice of CSR and business ethics in non-Western, transition economies, as insufficient attention is paid to the contextual specifications and underlying processes that may lead to different versions of CSR. Therefore, this paper examines the practice and sense-making of CSR and business ethics from the (...)
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  4.  1
    The Behavior of Organization in Economic Crisis: Integration, Interpretation, and Research Development.Vojko Potocan & Zlatko Nedelko - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (4):805-823.
    We investigated the significance of an economic crisis for organizations’ ethical behavior, employees’ unethical behavior, and association. To capture the effect of the “2008’ World economic crisis,” we compared the behaviors of organizations and employees’ unethical behavior during a crisis with their behavior in more favorable circumstances before and after the crisis. We used structural equation modeling to analyze answers collected from 2024 employees in Slovenian organizations between 2006 and 2016. The results showed significant growth of organizational engagement in ethical (...)
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  5.  2
    Management and Business Ethics in Central and Eastern Europe: Introduction to Special Issue.Anna Soulsby, Anna Remišová & Thomas Steger - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (4):739-746.
    This special issue focuses on the developments in ethical standards in the post-communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe including the former Soviet Union. Over thirty years have elapsed since the demise of the Soviet Bloc and, despite some common institutional features, the societies have had very different experiences with uneven developments across the region since the collapse of communism. In this special issue, the authors explore business and management ethics situated within the context of the challenges that face these (...)
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  6.  3
    Living with Corruption in Central and Eastern Europe: Social Identity and the Role of Moral Disengagement.Katalin Takacs Haynes & Matevž Rašković - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (4):825-845.
    We examine corruption across three Central and Eastern Europe countries through a social psychology framework which integrates social identity theory, social cognitive theory and moral disengagement mechanisms. We illustrate how various social identities influence individual and collective action in terms of ethical behavior and corruption, thereby creating, maintaining and perpetuating petty, grand and systemic public/private corruption through triadic co-determination via cognition, behavior and the environment. Despite growing research on corruption normalization, less is known about the cognitive and behavioral mechanisms in (...)
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  7.  1
    The Rise and Fading Away of Charisma. Leadership Transition and Managerial Ethics in the Post-Soviet Media Holdings.Dinara Tokbaeva - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (4):847-860.
    This paper examines post-communist managerial ethics during the emergence and transition of charismatic leadership in two privately owned media holdings in Russia and Kyrgyzstan. These media holdings were bootstrapped in the 1990s and 2000s by people without management experience and connections. This paper argues that Weberian charismatic leadership was a necessary leadership style to start a private business for people without links to elite networks. However, once firms establish themselves on the market, charisma fades and yields itself to a legal-rational (...)
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  8.  5
    The Effects of Spirituality and Religiosity on the Ethical Judgment in Organizations.Faisal Alshehri, Marianna Fotaki & Saleema Kauser - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (3):567-593.
    Despite the obvious link between spirituality, religiosity and ethical judgment, a definition for the nature of this relationship remains elusive due to conceptual and methodological limitations. To address these, we propose an integrative Spiritual-based model derived from categories presumed to be universal across religions and cultural contexts, to guide future business ethics research on religiosity. This article aims to empirically test in the context of Islam. It examines how different Muslims' views of God influence their ethical judgments in organizations, and (...)
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  9.  8
    Incumbent Stakeholder Management Performance and New Entry.André Laplume, Kent Walker, Zhou Zhang & Xin Yu - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (3):629-644.
    Instrumental stakeholder theory seeks to explain how managing stakeholders effectively can yield competitive advantage for incumbent firms. We extend instrumental stakeholder theory to explain and predict future competition operationalized as new entrepreneurial entries. Our study is among the first to empirically examine the relationships between aggregate stakeholder management performance and the entrepreneurial entries of individuals. Using a combined U.S. dataset from 2003 to 2013 from the Kinder, Lydenberg and Domini Index, Compustat, and Kauffman’s Entrepreneurship Survey, we find support for three (...)
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  10.  9
    Workplace Spirituality and Experienced Incivility at Work: Modeling Dark Triad as a Moderator.Madhu Lata & Richa Chaudhary - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (3):645-667.
    Management scholars view workplace spirituality as an effective means of improving employee well-being and organizational productivity. However, a spiritual work environment may also be beneficial for controlling employees’ experiences of uncivil behaviors in the workplace. Drawing on conservation of resources theory and cognitive appraisal theory, we proposed and explored the linkage between workplace spirituality and incivility experienced from supervisors and colleagues in the workspace. We also investigated the moderating effect of the dark triad on the relationship. The data collected from (...)
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  11.  2
    The Role of Mutual Funds in Corporate Social Responsibility.Zhichuan Frank Li, Saurin Patel & Srikanth Ramani - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (3):715-737.
    This paper examines the role of mutual funds in corporate social responsibility. Using a fund-level, holdings-based CSR score, we find that CSR-friendly mutual funds improve firms’ CSR standings. This effect is more pronounced for firms with higher mutual fund ownership and stronger corporate governance. We further show that while CSR-friendly mutual funds have influence on almost all CSR categories, they focus on increasing CSR strengths rather than reducing CSR concerns. We also discover that CSR-friendly funds are more likely to vote (...)
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  12.  3
    CSR and Family CEO: The Moderating Role of CEO’s Age.Olivier Meier & Guillaume Schier - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (3):595-612.
    This study examines to what extent different types of CEOs in family firms influence external and internal stakeholder-related CSP as compared to CEOs in nonfamily firms. Linking family CEO and nonfamily CEO with CSR outcomes, we provide evidence that family CEOs are positively associated with both external and internal CSR, whereas nonfamily CEOs within family firms tend to be negatively associated with both external and internal CSR. We show that the incumbent CEO’s age moderates the above relationships, indicating the existence (...)
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  13.  7
    Leader-Expressed Humility Predicting Team Psychological Safety: A Personality Dynamics Lens.Arménio Rego, Ana I. Melo, Dustin J. Bluhm, Miguel Pina E. Cunha & Dálcio Reis Júnior - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (3):669-686.
    In an application of the personality dynamics framework, we advance understanding on the relationship between baseline leader humility and team psychological safety by exploring the roles of humility variability and attractor strength. Specifically, we examine how the consistency of leader-expressed humility across team members operates as a boundary condition in the relationship between leader-expressed humility and team psychological safety. We also explore how the agreement between leader self-reported humility and leader-expressed humility operates as an attractor to predict such a consistency. (...)
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  14.  3
    Effects of Advice on Auditor Whistleblowing Propensity: Do Advice Source and Advisor Reassurance Matter?El’Fred Boo, Terence Ng & Premila Gowri Shankar - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (2):387-402.
    We conduct an experiment to investigate the joint effects of advisor reassurance and advice source in enhancing the impact of advice on auditors’ whistleblowing propensity. Participants from a Big 4 firm assess the likelihood that a questionable act involving a superior will be reported, both before and after receiving advice. We manipulate, between-participants, the advice source and advisor reassurance on the firm’s policy on whistleblower protection, holding constant the advice recommendation. Our study is underpinned by the premise that moral agents (...)
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  15.  3
    Retracted article: Compliance as a cost-effective system of interaction between business and government.Nikolay I. Dorogov, Ivan A. Kapitonov & Nazygul T. Batyrova - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (2):485-485.
  16.  8
    The Role of Authentic (Vs. Hubristic) Pride in Leveraging the Effectiveness of Cost Transparency.Felix Septianto, Joya A. Kemper, Fandy Tjiptono & Widya Paramita - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (2):423-439.
    In the era of consumer distrust of corporations, transparency is becoming a must rather than an option. While prior research has explored why businesses should disclose their costs and how consumers may react to such cost transparency, it is still unclear how marketers can best communicate cost transparency. The present research offers a practical examination of how and when cost transparency is effective, specifically, by examining the moderating role of authentic and hubristic pride on the effectiveness of cost transparency. Across (...)
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  17. “We Ought to Eat in Order to Work, Not Vice Versa”: MacIntyre, Practices, and the Best Work for Humankind.Matthew Sinnicks - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (2):263-274.
    This paper draws a distinction between ‘right MacIntyreans’ who are relatively optimistic that MacIntyre’s vision of ethics can be realised in capitalist society, and ‘left MacIntyreans’ who are sceptical about this possibility, and aims to show that the ‘left MacIntyrean’ position is a promising perspective available to business ethicists. It does so by arguing for a distinction between ‘community-focused’ practices and ‘excellence-focused’ practices. The latter concept fulfils the promise of practices to provide us with an understanding of the best work (...)
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  18. I Know What I Need: Optimization of Bribery.Yu Yan & Shusen Qi - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (2):311-332.
    Corruption has been a major obstacle to economic growth around the world. In this paper, we examine how firms interact with corrupt government officials either to minimize the impact of corruption on their operations or to maximize their benefit of paying a bribe. Our estimates show that firms know exactly what they need and use their limited resources to bribe only relevant government authorities. In other words, firms are rational bribers who know exactly what they need and optimize their bribes (...)
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  19.  11
    Moral Identity and the Quaker tradition: Moral Dissonance Negotiation in the WorkPlace.Nicholas Burton & Mai Chi Vu - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (1):127-141.
    Moral identity and moral dissonance in business ethics have explored tensions relating to moral self-identity and the pressures for identity compartmentalization in the workplace. Yet, the connection between these streams of scholarship, spirituality at work, and business ethics is under-theorized. In this paper, we examine the Quaker tradition to explore how Quakers’ interpret moral identity and negotiate the moral dissonance associated with a divided self in work organizations. Specifically, our study illuminates that while Quakers’ share a tradition-specific conception of “Quaker (...)
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  20.  4
    Correction to: Moral Burden of Bottom-Line Pursuits: How and When Perceptions of Top Management Bottom-Line Mentality Inhibit Supervisors’ Ethical Leadership Practices.Rebecca L. Greenbaum, Mayowa T. Babalola, Matthew J. Quade, Liang Guo & Yun Chung Kim - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (1):125-125.
    The name of the first author was incorrect in the initial online publication. The original article has been corrected.
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  21.  1
    The Moderating Effect of Cultural Values on the Relationship Between Corporate Social Performance and Firm Performance.Wei Shi & Kevin Veenstra - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (1):89-107.
    Using two national culture dimensions, we show that the influence of firms’ corporate social performance on corporate financial performance hinges on culture. Specifically, CFP is higher in those firms where CSR initiatives are congruent with the cultural environment. CSP has a negative impact on CFP for those firms domiciled in countries which are individualistic and favor flexibility. These findings are amplified for those firms with low levels of foreign influence in terms of institutional ownership and sales. Using a dataset covering (...)
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  22.  5
    Spheres of Influence: A Walzerian Approach to Business Ethics.Andrew C. Wicks, Patricia H. Werhane, Heather Elms & John Nolan - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (1):1-14.
    Michael Walzer is one of the most distinguished political philosophers and social critics of this century. His ideas have had great import and influence in political philosophy and political discussion, yet very few of his ideas have been incorporated explicitly into the business ethics literature. We argue that Walzer’s work provides an important conceptual canvas for business ethics scholars that has not been adequately explored. Scholars in business ethics often borrow from political theory and philosophy to generate new insights and (...)
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  23.  7
    Twitter Presence and Experience Improve Corporate Social Responsibility Outcomes.Siva K. Balasubramanian, Yiwei Fang & Zihao Yang - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (4):737-757.
    We investigate the role of social-media-triggered public pressure on corporate social responsibility that includes expectations of transparency and accountability on the firm’s part, and participative/evaluative inputs on the public’s part. Using the date when S&P 500 firms established corporate Twitter accounts, we investigate the impact of corporate social media exposure on CSR outcomes. Results from baseline regressions indicate that firms with Twitter accounts significantly outperform industry peers in CSR rating, after controlling for firm and industry characteristics. To test potential reverse (...)
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  24.  1
    Government Initiated Corporate Social Responsibility Activities: Evidence from a Poverty Alleviation Campaign in China.Yuyuan Chang, Wen He & Jianling Wang - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (4):661-685.
    In 2016 the Chinese government initiated a nationwide campaign aiming to eliminate poverty in China by 2020. Over 20% of listed firms in China have made significant contributions to the campaign. Using hand-collected data on listed firms’ contributions to the campaign and multivariate analyses, we examine whether managers’ and politicians’ personal incentives play an important role in firms’ contributions to the campaign. The results show that firms are more likely to contribute if they are state-owned and managers are appointed by (...)
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  25.  5
    Start ‘Em Early: Pastoral Power and the Confessional Culture of Leadership Development in the US University.Nicole Ferry & Eric Guthey - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (4):723-736.
    We apply a critical perspective on leadership development discourses and practices to the case of student leadership development programs in the US universities and colleges. We leverage the first author’s personal experiences as a facilitator in such programs to focus on the manner in which they adapt and deploy a variety of commodified pop and positive psychology techniques—including prominently among them icebreakers and psychological assessment tests—that encourage participants to share personal and emotional insights about themselves as the necessary prerequisite for (...)
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  26.  3
    To Formalize or Not to Formalize: Women Entrepreneurs’ Sensemaking of Business Registration in the Context of Nepal.Shova Thapa Karki, Mirela Xheneti & Adrian Madden - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (4):687-708.
    Despite the depiction of decisions to formalize informal firms as rational and ethical, many entrepreneurs in developing countries continue to operate informally regardless of its perceived illicit status. While existing research on why entrepreneurs choose informality emphasizes the economic costs and benefits of such decisions, this often overlooks the realities of the informal economy and the constraints which marginal populations—particularly women—face. In this paper, we use institutional theory and sensemaking to understand the experiences of women in the informal economy and (...)
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  27.  9
    The Role of Institutional Uncertainty for Social Sustainability of Companies and Supply Chains.Nikolas K. Kelling, Philipp C. Sauer, Stefan Gold & Stefan Seuring - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (4):813-833.
    Global sourcing largely occurs from so-called emerging markets and developing economies. In these contexts, substantial leverage effects for sustainability in supply chains can be expected by reducing adverse impacts on society and minimising related risks. For this ethical end, an adequate understanding of the respective sourcing contexts is fundamental. This case study of South Africa’s mining sector uses institutional theory and the notion of institutional uncertainty to empirically analyse the challenges associated with establishing social sustainability. The case study research is (...)
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  28.  2
    The Influence of Interorganizational Collaboration on Logic Conciliation and Tensions Within Hybrid Organizations: Insights from Social Enterprise–Corporate Collaborations.Claudia Savarese, Benjamin Huybrechts & Marek Hudon - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (4):709-721.
    An increasing amount of research has examined the management of competing logics, and possible tensions arising between them, within “hybrid organizations.” However, the ways in which the relationships of hybrids with other organizations shape the conciliation of these logics and tensions have received limited attention so far. In this theoretical paper, we examine how hybrid organizations deal with interorganizational collaboration, in particular whether and how their hybridity can be maintained when they partner with “dominant-logic organizations.” Drawing on empirical literature on (...)
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  29.  2
    Transmodernizing Management Historiographies of Consumerism for the Majority.Alex Faria & Marcus Hemais - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (3):447-465.
    Within an increasingly unequal, heterogeneous, and authoritarian Global North, a new global consumerism movement championed by activist consumers, together with academics, managers, and organizations, has emerged as the ultimate ethical management discourse for a better global future. NGC reframes Cold War official history of buycott consumerism by emancipating “passive” consumers and “insurgent” boycotts. Drawing on decolonial liberating transmodernity from Latin America, this paper shows how and why “old” and “new” dominant histories of consumerism deny the racialist/colonialist side of liberal capitalism. (...)
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  30.  7
    Correction to: Progressive Pricing: The Ethical Case for Price Personalization.Jerod Coker & Jean-Manuel Izaret - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (2):399-399.
    The article Progressive Pricing: The Ethical Case for Price Personalization, written by Jerod Coker and Jean-Manuel Izaret, was originally published electronically on the publisher’s internet portal on 4 June 2020 without open access. With the author’ decision to opt for Open Choice the copyright of the article changed on 15 July 2020 to © The Author 2020 and the article is forthwith distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any (...)
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  31.  3
    Linking Management Theory with Poverty Alleviation Efforts Through Market Orchestration.Geoffrey M. Kistruck & Patrick Shulist - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (2):423-446.
    Top-tier management journals are advocating for greater relevance from management research to Grand Challenges such as poverty alleviation. However, many scholars struggle to identify linkages between the practical undertaking of poverty alleviation and theory development opportunities in the management literature. Responding to this call, we develop and outline a framework for theorizing from an increasingly common business-based poverty alleviation approach known as ‘market orchestration.’ Core to this framework are a set of contextual difference that contrast with the Western environment in (...)
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  32.  8
    Corporate Governance and Supplemental Environmental Projects: A Restorative Justice Approach.Muhammad Nadeem - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (2):261-280.
    Firms have traditionally responded to environmental violations by increasing information disclosure and/or communication to manage stakeholder perceptions. As such, these approaches may be symbolic in nature, with no genuine intention to improve the environment. We draw from restorative justice grounded in stakeholder theory and explore a relatively new approach in the form of supplemental environmental projects aimed at restoring the environment, and empirically examine the role of corporate governance in firms’ decisions to undertake reparative actions. Using environmental violations and SEPs (...)
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  33.  5
    Leaning in: A Historical Perspective on Influencing Women’s Leadership.Simone T. A. Phipps & Leon C. Prieto - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (2):245-259.
    The term “lean in” was popularized by Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook COO, via her #1 Best Seller encouraging women to defy their fears and dare to be leaders in their fields. She received criticism because although admitting to external barriers contributing to the gender gap in leadership, the scope of her book focused on the internal shortcomings of women. She asserted that women are hindered by barriers that exist within themselves, and provided practical tips, backed by research, to equip women with (...)
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  34.  7
    Feminist Ethics and Women Leaders: From Difference to Intercorporeality.Alison Pullen & Sheena J. Vachhani - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (2):233-243.
    This paper problematises the ways women’s leadership has been understood in relation to male leadership rather than on its own terms. Focusing specifically on ethical leadership, we challenge and politicise the symbolic status of women in leadership by considering the practice of New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern. In so doing, we demonstrate how leadership ethics based on feminised ideals such as care and empathy are problematic in their typecasting of women as being simply the other to men. We apply (...)
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  35.  5
    Review of Homeland Elegies by Ayad Akhtar. [REVIEW]Azish Filabi - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (1):229-231.
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  36.  1
    Review of Homeland Elegies by Ayad Akhtar: Little, Brown and Company, Boston, 2020, 368 Pp., ISBN: 978-0316496421. [REVIEW]Azish Filabi - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (1):229-231.
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  37.  2
    When is Sustainability a Liability, and When Is It an Asset? Quality Inferences for Core and Peripheral Attributes.Siv Skard, Sveinung Jørgensen & Lars Jacob Tynes Pedersen - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (1):109-132.
    Sustainable products offered in today’s marketplace are labelled with product-related green attributes or non-product-related green attributes. The current research investigates consumers’ inferences about a product’s functional quality when its core attributes are green and when its peripheral attributes are green. Four experimental studies and an internal meta-analysis show that there is a sustainability liability effect in strength-dependent categories, and a sustainability asset effect in gentleness-dependent categories. Our research contributes to the current understanding of how consumers make inferences about product quality (...)
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  38.  7
    Do Management Training Grounds Reduce Internal Auditor Objectivity and External Auditor Reliance? The Influence of Family Firms.Ikseon Suh, Adi Masli & John T. Sweeney - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (1):205-227.
    We test competing theoretical perspectives of family firm governance in two separate studies by investigating whether family firm control moderates the detrimental effect of a management training ground on internal auditor objectivity and on the external auditor’s decision to rely on the internal audit function. In Study 1, we assess the objectivity of internal auditors working under an IAF that serves as a MTG or non-MTG and located in a family or non-family firm. A key result of Study 1 is (...)
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  39.  5
    The Moral Disillusionment Model of Organizational Transgressions: Ethical Transgressions Trigger More Negative Reactions from Consumers When Committed by Nonprofits.Matthew J. Hornsey, Cassandra M. Chapman, Heidi Mangan, Stephen La Macchia & Nicole Gillespie - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (4):653-671.
    We tested whether the impact of an organizational transgression on consumer sentiment differs depending on whether the organization is a nonprofit. Competing hypotheses were tested: that people expect higher ethical standards from a nonprofit than a commercial organization, and so having this expectation violated generates a harsher response and that a nonprofit’s reputation as a moral entity buffers it against the negative consequences of transgressions. In three experiments participants were told that an organization had engaged in fraud, exploitation of women, (...)
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  40.  1
    Managers as Moral Leaders: Moral Identity Processes in the Context of Work.Mari Huhtala, Päivi Fadjukoff & Jane Kroger - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (4):639-652.
    This qualitative study explores how business leaders narrate their personal ways of recognizing, reasoning, and resolving moral conflicts and what these stories reveal about their moral identity processes within organizational contexts. Based on interviews with 25 business leaders, 4 moral identity statuses were identified: achievement, moratorium, foreclosure, and diffusion. The moral identity statuses were based on how leaders approached and interpreted moral conflicts and what the influence of the organizational context was in their moral decision-making processes. Some remained steadfast in (...)
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  41.  9
    Designing Ethical Management Control: Overcoming the Harmful Effect of Management Control Systems on Job-Related Stress.Stefan Linder, Bernard Leca, Adrián Zicari & Veronica Casarin - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (4):747-764.
    Ethical aspects of management control systems are attracting increasing attention among scholars and practitioners. Much of the work centers on their aims. We complement this scholarship by applying the ethical principle of “no harm,” i.e., non-maleficence, to examine how those aims are achieved. We illustrate this approach by exploring the effects of four MCS designs on job-related stress drawing on the differentiation of stress into two dimensions: a challenge and a threat dimension. Results from a lagged field-survey with 471 managers (...)
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  42.  3
    On Ethical Violations in Microfinance Backed Small Businesses: Family and Household Welfare.Rahul Nilakantan, Deepak Iyengar, Samar K. Datta & Shashank Rao - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (4):785-802.
    The microfinance business model focuses largely on lending to the woman in the household, rather than the man. The belief is that women are more trustworthy borrowers than men, and that lending to women may have increased social impact. Yet in several cases, women do not have control over the loan backed business despite being the borrower of record. Such takeover of the business by the man constitutes an ethical violation. We find that high dependency ratios in the family are (...)
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  43.  3
    Do National Differences in Social Capital and Corporate Ethical Behaviour Perceptions Influence the Use of Collateral? Cross-Country Evidence.Panagiota Papadimitri, Fotios Pasiouras & Menelaos Tasiou - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (4):765-784.
    We study the impact of social capital and perceptions about corporate ethical behaviour on the use of collateral in corporate borrowing. Using a dataset of more than 17,500 firms operating in over 100 transition and developing countries, we find evidence that country-level social capital and better perceptions about corporate ethical behaviour are negatively associated with the likelihood to pledge collateral. In addition, these country-level characteristics influence the value of collateral relative to the loan value.
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  44.  1
    Do National Differences in Social Capital and Corporate Ethical Behaviour Perceptions Influence the Use of Collateral? Cross-Country Evidence.Panagiota Papadimitri, Fotios Pasiouras & Menelaos Tasiou - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (4):765-784.
    We study the impact of social capital and perceptions about corporate ethical behaviour on the use of collateral in corporate borrowing. Using a dataset of more than 17,500 firms operating in over 100 transition and developing countries, we find evidence that country-level social capital and better perceptions about corporate ethical behaviour are negatively associated with the likelihood to pledge collateral. In addition, these country-level characteristics influence the value of collateral relative to the loan value.
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  45. To Be or Not to Be Governed Like That? Harmful and/or Offensive Advertising Complaints in the United Kingdom’s (Self-) Regulatory Context.Kristina Auxtova, Mary Brennan & Stephen Dunne - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (3):425-446.
    This paper demonstrates how the UK’s Advertising Standards Authority governs advertising ethics with and on behalf of its members and stakeholders. Drawing on an archive of 310 non-commercial adjudication reports, we highlight the substantive norms and procedural mechanisms through which the ASA governs advertising complaints alleging offence and/or harm. Substantively, the ASA precludes potential normative transgressions by publishing, disseminating, consulting upon, and updating detailed codes of advertising conduct. Procedurally, the ASA adjudicates between allegations and justifications of offence and harm on (...)
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  46.  2
    How Lack of Integrity and Tyrannical Leadership of Managers Influence Employee Improvement-Oriented Behaviors.Jean-Sébastien Boudrias, Vincent Rousseau & Denis Lajoie - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (3):487-502.
    This study investigates how lack of perceived organizational integrity by managers negatively affects bottom-up improvement-oriented behaviors at lower hierarchical levels. It is expected that expressions of tyrannical leadership by the manager, a self-serving type of leadership, will mediate the relation between POI and job improvement behaviors. Further, this study investigates the role of mimicry of manager behaviors and of other supervisor’s responses to understand how manager tyrannical leadership effect is carried through to the lowest level. Our initial postulate is that (...)
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  47.  2
    Corporate Leadership and Mass Atrocity.Sarah Federman - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (3):407-423.
    With the last Holocaust survivors quietly passing away, one might also expect to see accountability debates slowing to a trickle. Surprisingly, however, recent years show an upswing in corporate World War II-related atonement debates. Interest in corporate participation in mass atrocity has expanded worldwide; yet what constitutes ethical corporate behavior during and after war remains understudied. This article considers these questions through a study of the French National Railways’ roles during the German occupation and its more recent struggle to make (...)
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  48.  12
    Servant Leadership Influencing Store-Level Profit: The Mediating Effect of Employee Flourishing.Vincent J. Giolito, Robert C. Liden, Dirk van Dierendonck & Gordon W. Cheung - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (3):503-524.
    Servant leadership and other ethical and moral approaches to leadership have been criticized for focusing on followers to the potential detriment of other stakeholders, specifically shareholders. With individual data collected from 485 respondents nested in 55 similar stores in a single company, within a large metropolitan area in France, we tested a multilevel model whereby servant leadership relates positively to business-unit performance measured by profit growth—a key indicator for shareholders—through the mediation of employee flourishing and revenue growth. With financial performance (...)
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  49.  5
    Should Managers Provide General or Specific Ethical Guidelines to Employees: Insights from a Mixed Methods Study.Shahidul Hassan, Sheela Pandey & Sanjay K. Pandey - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (3):563-580.
    This article contributes to our understanding of how communication of ethical guidelines by managers may reduce the likelihood of employee unethical behavior. We conduct two vignette experiments to assess the impact of communicating two types of ethical guidelines—general and specific. The second study employs mixed methods experimental design, collecting qualitative data during the experiment. We find that communicating ethical guidelines by managers reduces the likelihood of unethical behavior, but contrary to our hypothesis and prior literature, we observe that general ethical (...)
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  50.  3
    The Unethical Enterprise of the Past: Lessons from the Collapse of Archaeological Heritage Management in Spain.Eva Parga Dans & Pablo Alonso González - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (3):447-461.
    This paper explores the underlying factors behind the collapse of commercial archaeology in Spain, with implications for other international contexts. It contributes to the current global debate about heritage ethics, adding nuance and conceptual depth to critical management studies and cultural heritage management in their approach to business ethics. Similar to other European contexts, Spanish archaeological management thrived during the 1990s and 2000s as a business model based on policies directed at safeguarding cultural heritage. The model had controversial ethical implications (...)
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  51.  9
    Two Wrongs Make a ‘Right’? Exploring the Ethical Calculus of Earnings Management Before Large Labor Dismissals.Ionela Andreicovici, Nava Cohen, Silvia Ferramosca & Alessandro Ghio - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (2):379-405.
    This paper examines whether firms strategically legitimize large labor dismissals by performing ex-ante downward earnings management. We further assess whether the effect is larger under stakeholder pressure and whether these practices influence the external perception of firms’ behavior. As laying off employees without an economic reason is perceived as a breach of the social contract, stakeholders pressure firms to provide economic justification for LLDs. We argue that firms strategically legitimize LLDs by artificially worsening their financial performance through downward earnings management. (...)
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  52.  12
    Do Corporate Social Responsibility Reports Convey Value Relevant Information? Evidence from Report Readability and Tone.Shuili Du & Kun Yu - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (2):253-274.
    Corporate social responsibility reporting is becoming mainstream, yet there is limited research on whether and how CSR reports communicate value relevant information. We examine the effects of CSR report readability and tone on future CSR performance and the market reaction around the release of CSR reports. Using a hand-collected dataset of Fortune 500 companies that published stand-alone CSR reports from 2002 to 2014, we find that 1-year-ahead CSR performance is positively associated with the changes in both CSR report readability and (...)
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  53.  5
    Analogical Encoding Fosters Ethical Decision Making Because Improved Knowledge of Ethical Principles Increases Moral Awareness.Jihyeon Kim & Jeffrey Loewenstein - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (2):307-324.
    The current paper examines whether knowledge of an ethical principle influences moral awareness and ethical decision making. Using hypothetical scenarios and a behavioral task, three experiments examine the effects of deepening people’s knowledge of ethical principles. In each study, an analogical encoding learning intervention led to greater knowledge of an ethical principle, which in turn resulted in a greater likelihood of moral awareness and making ethical decisions. These findings suggest that moral awareness is partly a matter of the depth of (...)
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  54.  3
    From ‘Whodunit’ to ‘How’: Detective Stories and Auditability in Qualitative Business Ethics Research.Lakshmi Balachandran Nair - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (2):195-209.
    Ethical considerations in today’s businesses are manifold and range from human rights issues and the well-being of employees to income inequality and environmental sustainability. Regardless of the specific topic being investigated, an integral part of business ethics research consists of deeply comprehending the personal meanings, intentions, behaviors, judgements, and attitudes that people possess. To this end, researchers are often encouraged to use more qualitative methods to understand the dynamic and fuzzy field of business ethics, which involves collecting in-depth information in (...)
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  55.  7
    Responding to Diffused Stakeholders on Social Media: Connective Power and Firm Reactions to CSR-Related Twitter Messages.Gregory D. Saxton, Charlotte Ren & Chao Guo - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (2):229-252.
    Social media offers a platform for diffused stakeholders to interact with firms—alternatively praising, questioning, and chastising businesses for their CSR performance and seeking to engage in two-way dialogue. In 2014, 163,402 public messages were sent to Fortune 200 firms’ CSR-focused Twitter accounts, each of which was either shared, replied to, “liked,” or ignored by the targeted firm. This paper examines firm reactions to these messages, building a model of firm response to stakeholders that combines the notions of CSR communication and (...)
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  56.  8
    When Blame-Giving Crisis Communications are Persuasive: A Dual-Influence Model and Its Boundary Conditions.Paolo Antonetti & Ilaria Baghi - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (1):59-78.
    Companies faced with a crisis sometimes blame others in their communications, when they feel that responsibility for the negative event lies elsewhere. Research has argued that stakeholders often react negatively to this type of message, because they perceive them as an unfair attempt to deny responsibility. In four experiments, examining blame directed at an employee and a supplier, we complement existing research by demonstrating that blame-giving messages can be persuasive in certain circumstances. Blame-giving communications can improve perceptions of firm ethicality (...)
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  57.  3
    Stakeholder Perceptions of Risk in Mandatory Corporate Responsibility Disclosure.Lisa Baudot, Zhongwei Huang & Dana Wallace - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (1):151-174.
    The extraction of natural resources is a controversial business practice that has profound ethical and economic risk implications for both firms involved in extractive activities and society at large. In response to these implications, the Dodd–Frank Act of 2010 directed the Securities and Exchange Commission to create the first ever rules requiring annual corporate responsibility disclosures. The two proposed rules, requiring disclosure of the source of “conflict minerals” and of payments to foreign governments by extractive firms, conjured intense debate among (...)
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  58.  3
    Between Morals and Markets? An Interdisciplinary Conceptual Framework for Studying Working Conditions at Catholic Social Service Providers in Belgium and Germany.Nadja Doerflinger, Dries Bosschaert, Adeline Otto, Tim Opgenhaffen & Lander Vermeerbergen - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (1):15-29.
    Despite sharing Catholic Social Teaching as their system of morals and both being confronted with marketisation pressures, working conditions at German and Belgian Catholic social service providers of elderly care differ. We argue that an interdisciplinary approach is needed to understand such differences, as interpretation of CST is mediated by local contexts. Working conditions result from interactions shaped by each country’s respective religious, legal and socio-economic contexts, providing players with different levels of discretion and power resources. In Belgium, working conditions (...)
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  59.  2
    The Association Between Vertical Equity and Presidential Voting Behavior and Taxpayers’ Compliance.Jonathan Farrar, Dawn W. Massey, Errol Osecki & Linda Thorne - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (1):101-114.
    Since taking office, the President of the United States has consistently refused to make his tax returns available for public scrutiny. In so doing, he has broken with presidential tradition and kept people guessing about what his tax returns would show if they were disclosed. Interestingly enough, in the absence of concrete knowledge about the President’s tax circumstances, some taxpayers perceive that he did not pay his fair share and others perceive that he did. This situation presents an opportunity for (...)
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  60.  11
    Doing Good While Behaving Badly: Checkout Charity Process Mechanisms.Michael Giebelhausen, Benjamin Lawrence & HaeEun Helen Chun - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (1):133-149.
    Companies are increasingly using cause-related marketing campaigns to engage consumers during the purchase process and highlight their own corporate social responsibility initiatives. One growing trend among retailers is the use of charity campaigns, where cashiers or technologies solicit consumers to donate money at checkout. Though these checkout charity campaigns are ubiquitous, little is known about their impact on consumers or the psychological processes involved. This paper addresses this gap by examining the process by which checkout charity appeals may license consumers (...)
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  61.  16
    Sustainability Beyond Instrumentality: Towards an Immanent Ethics of Organizational Environmentalism.Christian Garmann Johnsen - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (1):1-14.
    In research on organizational environmentalism, there has been a repeated call for ways to go beyond the business case for sustainability frame. While the business case frame assumes that developing eco-friendly solutions can benefit firms financially, this article highlights the importance of challenging established understandings of sustainability. To this end, I introduce Deleuze’s distinction between morality and ethics. Morality involves passing judgements on the basis of values. Ethics provides an immanent evaluation of the principles by which specific solutions are considered (...)
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  62.  4
    Review of Honorable Business: A Framework for Business in a Just and Humane Society by James R. Otteson. [REVIEW]Gregory J. Robson - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (1):191-193.
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  63.  16
    A Pyramid of Hate Perspective on Religious Bias, Discrimination and Violence.Jawad Syed & Faiza Ali - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (1):43-58.
    This study provides a ‘pyramid of hate’ perspective on issues and challenges facing minority religious communities in social and political climates that bestow permission to hate. Previous research shows that adverse social stereotypes and biases, together with non-inclusive policies and practices at the level of the state, create an enabling environment that signals the legitimacy of public hostility towards a minority community. This paper argues that such climates of hate within and outside the workplace may be better understood by paying (...)
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  64.  7
    Do Corporate Frauds Distort Suppliers’ Investment Decisions?Cheng Yin, Xin Cheng, Yinan Yang & Dan Palmon - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (1):115-132.
    This study examines whether customer firms’ unethical behavior distorts suppliers’ investment decisions. Using litigation and restatement to measure unethical behavior, we find that suppliers with customers engaged in frauds tend to invest more during the cheating period, compared to unaffected suppliers. In cross-sectional analyses, we examine the moderating effect of suppliers’ reliance on customer information and peer information. Results show that more industry peers’ voluntary disclosures and analyst coverage, lower sales volatility, and lower relationship-specific investments mitigate the distortion effect on (...)
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  65.  4
    Correction to: Corporate Essence and Identity in Criminal Law.Mihailis E. Diamantis - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (4):833-833.
    A correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-021-04827-y.
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  66.  5
    Correction to: Drivers and Inhibitors of Internet Privacy Concern: A Multidimensional Development Theory Perspective.Weiyin Hong, Frank K. Y. Chan & James Y. L. Thong - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (4):835-835.
    A correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-021-04854-9.
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  67. Sweatshops and Free Action: The Stakes of the Actualism/Possibilism Debate for Business Ethics.Travis Timmerman & Abe Zakhem - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (4):683-694.
    Whether an action is morally right depends upon the alternative acts available to the agent. Actualists hold that what an agent would actually do determines her moral obligations. Possibilists hold that what an agent could possibly do determines her moral obligations. Both views face compelling criticisms. Despite the fact that actualist and possibilist assumptions are at the heart of seminal arguments in business ethics, there has been no explicit discussion of actualism and possibilism in the business ethics literature. This paper (...)
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  68.  6
    Ethical Commitments and Credit Market Regulations.Saad Azmat & Hira Ghaffar - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (3):421-433.
    In this paper we examine some of the economic and ethical consequences of different credit market regulations, including usury laws, complete prohibition of interest and providing ease to the borrower upon default. The references to these credit market regulations can be found in many religious and moral philosophy texts. We first examine the effectiveness of these regulations in deterring exploitative lending by developing a model that shows lending can be regulated through either act-based or harm-based regulations. We show that act-based (...)
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  69.  3
    Reporting Concerns About Earnings Quality: An Examination of Corporate Managers.Joseph F. Brazel, Lorenzo Lucianetti & Tammie J. Schaefer - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (3):435-457.
    Using an experiment with corporate financial managers, we find that when red flags are present in the financial statements under their review, managers identify those red flags and, in turn, have greater concerns over earnings quality. In addition, when pressure to meet a financial target is high, managers are more concerned about earnings quality when red flags are present. We also document that when red flags are present, managers are more likely to report both internally to their CEO and, if (...)
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  70.  4
    A Multilevel Analysis of the Relationship Between Ethical Leadership and Ostracism: The Roles of Relational Climate, Employee Mindfulness, and Work Unit Structure.Amanda Christensen-Salem, Fred O. Walumbwa, Mayowa T. Babalola, Liang Guo & Everlyne Misati - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (3):619-638.
    Drawing on insights from social learning and social cognitive perspectives and research on the multilevel reality of leadership influences, we developed and tested a multilevel model that examines mechanisms and conditions through which ethical leadership deters work unit- and individual-level ostracism. Based on two field studies using multiple measurement points, we found that at the work unit level of analysis, relational climate partially mediates the negative relationship between ethical leadership and work unit-level ostracism whereas state mindfulness partially mediates the cross-level (...)
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  71.  5
    Book Review of African Virtue Ethics Traditions for Business and Management Edited by Kemi Ogunyemi: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2020, 192 Pp., ISBN: 978-1789905953. [REVIEW]C. Bryan Davis - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (3):639-643.
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  72.  10
    Material Sustainability Information and Stock Price Informativeness.Jody Grewal, Clarissa Hauptmann & George Serafeim - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (3):513-544.
    As part of the Securities and Exchange Commission’s revision of Regulation S–K, which lays out reporting requirements for publicly-listed companies, many investors proposed the mandatory disclosure of sustainability information in the form of environmental, social and governance data. However, progress is contingent on collecting evidence regarding which sustainability disclosures are financially material. To inform this issue, we examine materiality standards developed by the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board. Firms voluntarily disclosing more SASB-identified sustainability information exhibit greater price informativeness, while the disclosure (...)
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  73.  17
    How Should Responsible Investors Behave? Keynes’s Distinction Between Entrepreneurship and Speculation Revisited.Christian Hecker - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (3):459-473.
    This paper deals with Keynes’s distinction between entrepreneurship and speculation, regarding business people in general and especially investors’ behaviour. Based on Keynes’s thoughts about financial markets, it analyses how different motivations influence the decision-making process of investors and its consequences for stock markets and the real economy and clarifies that Keynes’s considerations are still useful for understanding contemporary developments and risks in the financial system. Furthermore, it points out that Keynes’s theories and policy recommendations should be understood in the context (...)
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  74.  3
    Identity Drift: The Multivocality of Ethical Identity in Islamic Financial Institution.Nunung Nurul Hidayah, Alan Lowe & Ivo De Loo - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (3):475-494.
    In today’s neo-liberalist world, Islamic financial institutions face many difficulties combining contemporary financial thinking with Islamic, faith-based principles, on which their day-to-day operations ought to be based. Hence, IFI are likely to experience shifts/changes in organizational and ethical identity due to tensions that the combination of these principles invokes. We present an in-depth case study that focuses on these shifts in a major European based IFI across a 14-year period. We conceptualize identity change as drift, highlighting the multivocal nature of (...)
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  75.  4
    Microfranchising to Alleviate Poverty: An Innovation Network Perspective. [REVIEW]Laté Lawson-Lartego & Lars Mathiassen - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (3):545-563.
    In 2015, the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals set an ethical imperative: end extreme poverty and hunger by 2030. Microfranchising can contribute to this critical effort by offering nonprofit organizations and businesses an opportunity to rapidly scale entrepreneurship within Base of the Pyramid markets. However, while abundant literature exists on traditional franchising, we know little about how to leverage microfranchising in resource-scarce contexts to alleviate poverty. To address this gap, we report a longitudinal case study of a microfranchise network aimed (...)
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  76.  6
    Coercive Pressures and Anti-corruption Reporting: The Case of ASEAN Countries.Tiyas Kurnia Sari, Fitra Roman Cahaya & Corina Joseph - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (3):495-511.
    This paper aims to investigate the extent of anti-corruption reporting by ASEAN companies and examine whether coercive factors influence the level of disclosure. The authors adopt indicators from the Global Reporting Initiative version 4.0 to measure the extent of anti-corruption disclosures in 117 companies’ reports. Informed by a coercive isomorphism tenet drawn from the institutional theory, the authors propose that several institutional factors influence the extent of their voluntary disclosures. The findings reveal that a large degree of variability difference between (...)
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  77.  4
    When and Why Do Good People Not Do Good Deeds? Third-Party Observers’ Unfavorable Reactions to Negative Workplace Gossip.Xing Zhou, Lele Fan, Cong Cheng & Yancheng Fan - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (3):599-617.
    A small but growing body of research suggests that witnessing mistreatment affects third-party observers’ attitudes and behaviors. Based on the framework of belief in a just world theory, this study examines perverse secondary victimization which is particularly pervasive in negative workplace gossip from a third-party perspective but has nonetheless received little attention in organizational research. We present a moderated mediation model and hypothesize that third-party observers’ deservingness judgment would mediate the effect of observed negative workplace gossip and interact with their (...)
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  78.  11
    Pay Secrecy, Discrimination, and Autonomy.Matthew Caulfield - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (2):399-420.
    A question facing nearly all private firms is whether they may keep employee pay secret. Many think it is obvious that firms are obligated to disclose a good deal of pay information once we properly appreciate the severity of pay discrimination in our economy and the autonomy-related interests that would be served by pay disclosure. This article puts forth a dissenting voice against the vast majority of recent commentary. It exploits a fissure between reasons we have to support certain coercive (...)
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  79.  7
    Punishment by Securities Regulators, Corporate Social Responsibility and the Cost of Debt.Guangming Gong, Xin Huang, Sirui Wu, Haowen Tian & Wanjin Li - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (2):337-356.
    This study examines whether penalties issued to Chinese listed companies by securities regulators for violations of corporate law affect the cost of debt, and the moderating role of corporate social responsibility fulfillment on this relationship. Our sample consists of firms listed on Shanghai and Shenzhen stock exchanges from 2011 to 2017 and the data are collected from the announcements of China Securities Regulatory Commission. The findings are as follows: punishment announcements by regulatory authorities increase the cost of debt; and the (...)
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  80.  8
    Measuring Social Performance in Social Enterprises: A Global Study of Microfinance Institutions.Leif Atle Beisland, Kwame Ohene Djan, Roy Mersland & Trond Randøy - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (1):51-71.
    Social enterprises in the microfinance industry need to adhere to both financial and social demands. Critics argue that there is a mission drift away from the social mission, and this has motivated the introduction of social rating agencies to strengthen the business ethics of microfinance institutions. Using a global dataset of 204 socially rated MFIs from 58 countries, we assess the factors that drive the social performance ratings of MFIs. Overall our results show that social ratings of MFIs are significantly (...)
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  81.  5
    Local Public Corruption and Bank Lending Activity in the United States.Theodora Bermpei, Antonios Nikolaos Kalyvas & Leone Leonida - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (1):73-98.
    Using a conviction-based measure, we find that local public corruption exerts a negative effect on the lending activity of US banks. Our baseline estimations show that the difference in public corruption between, for example, Alabama, where corruption is high, and Minnesota, where corruption is low, implies that banks headquartered in the former state grant 0.55% less credit ceteris paribus. Using proxies for relationship lending and monitoring, we also find that these bank characteristics weaken the negative effect of public corruption on (...)
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  82.  10
    Managerial Aspirations and Suspect Leaders: The Effect of Relative Performance and Leader Succession on Organizational Misconduct.Mark Davis, Marcus Cox & Melissa Baucus - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (1):123-138.
    Explanations of organizational misconduct frequently point to declining firm performance and/or the actions of unethical or suspect leaders. Evidence that high-performing firms act illegally or unethically is an enigma. The purpose of this paper is to address these issues by exploring organizational performance using aspirational rather than absolute measures and examining the effect that suspect leader succession has on the increased probability of organizational misconduct. Our analysis of 128 collegiate football programs competing between 1953 and 2016 reveals an increased likelihood (...)
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  83.  9
    Ingratiating with Despotic Leaders to Gain Status: The Role of Power Distance Orientation and Self-enhancement Motive.Dirk De Clercq, Tasneem Fatima & Sadia Jahanzeb - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (1):157-174.
    This study adds to business ethics research by investigating how employees’ exposure to despotic leadership might influence their peer-rated workplace status, along with a mediating role of ingratiatory behavior targeted at supervisors and a moderating role of their power distance orientation and self-enhancement motive. Multisource, three-wave data from employees and their peers in Pakistani organizations reveal that exposure to despotic leaders spurs employees’ upward ingratiatory behavior, and this behavior in turn can help them attain higher status in the organization. The (...)
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  84.  7
    The Influence of a Family Business Climate and CEO–CFO Relationship Quality on Misreporting Conduct.Jingyu Gao, Adi Masli, Ikseon Suh & Jingchang Xu - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (1):99-122.
    This study answers Vazquez’s :691–709, 2016) call for more research focused on the intersection between family firms and business ethics. We investigate two contextual factors potentially affecting the ethical reporting of chief financial officers : a firm’s social ties to the controlling family and the CFOs’ perceived relationship quality with the CEO. We test our hypotheses by examining the financial reporting behavior of Chinese CFOs who work at family or nonfamily businesses and in private or public firms. Results of this (...)
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  85.  3
    Confident and Cunning: Negotiator Self-Efficacy Promotes Deception in Negotiations.Joseph P. Gaspar & Maurice E. Schweitzer - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (1):139-155.
    Self-confidence is associated with many positive outcomes, and training programs routinely seek to build participants’ self-efficacy. In this article, however, we consider whether self-confidence increases unethical behavior. In a series of studies, we explore the relationship between negotiator self-efficacy—an individual’s confidence in his or her negotiation ability—and the use of deception. We find that individuals high in negotiator self-efficacy are more likely to use deception than individuals low in negotiator self-efficacy. We also find that perceptions of the risk of deception (...)
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  86.  5
    The Ethics of Entrepreneurial Philanthropy.Charles Harvey, Jillian Gordon & Mairi Maclean - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (1):33-49.
    A salient if under researched feature of the new age of global inequalities is the rise to prominence of entrepreneurial philanthropy, the pursuit of transformational social goals through philanthropic investment in projects animated by entrepreneurial principles. Super-wealthy entrepreneurs in this way extend their suzerainty from the domain of the economic to the domains of the social and political. We explore the ethics and ethical implications of entrepreneurial philanthropy through systematic comparison with what we call customary philanthropy, which preferences support for (...)
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  87.  7
    Review of Joy at Work: Organizing Your Professional Life by Marie Kondo and Scott Sonenshein: Little, Brown Spark, 2020, 320 Pp., ISBN: 978-0316497954. [REVIEW]M. Joy Hayes - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (1):209-210.
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  88.  7
    The Transformation from Traditional Nonprofit Organizations to Social Enterprises: An Institutional Entrepreneurship Perspective.Wai Wai Ko & Gordon Liu - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (1):15-32.
    The development of commercial revenue streams allows traditional nonprofit organizations to increase financial certainty in response to the reduction of traditional funding sources and increased competition. In order to capture commercial revenue-generating opportunities, traditional nonprofit organizations need to deliberately transform themselves into social enterprises. Through the theoretical lens of institutional entrepreneurship, we explore the institutional work that supports this transformation by analyzing field interviews with 64 institutional entrepreneurs from UK-based social enterprises. We find that the route to incorporate commercial processes (...)
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  89.  4
    Advertising Primed: How Professional Identity Affects Moral Reasoning.Erin Schauster, Patrick Ferrucci, Edson Tandoc & Tara Walker - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (1):175-187.
    Moral reasoning among media professionals varies. Historically, advertising professionals score lower on the Defining Issues Test than their media colleagues in journalism and public relations. However, the extent to which professional identity impacts media professionals’ moral reasoning has yet to be examined. To understand how professional identity influences moral reasoning, if at all, and guided by theories of moral psychology and social identity, 134 advertising practitioners working in the USA participated in an online experiment. While professional identity was not a (...)
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  90.  8
    When the Law Distinguishes Between the Enterprise and the Corporation: The Case of the New French Law on Corporate Purpose.Blanche Segrestin, Armand Hatchuel & Kevin Levillain - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (1):1-13.
    A recent French reform has revised the legal definition of the corporation. In essence, the law stipulates that the corporation must be run with due regard to the social and environmental impacts of its activity. It also introduces the notion of raison d’être and affords the possibility for any corporation to assign social or environmental purposes to itself, defined in its by-laws. This reform is similar to recent reforms in the UK and the US, but is based on an original (...)
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  91.  10
    Mood and Ethical Decision Making: Positive Affect and Corporate Philanthropy.Leon Zolotoy, Don O’Sullivan, Myeong-Gu Seo & Madhu Veeraraghavan - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (1):189-208.
    This study examines the influence of mood on corporate philanthropic giving. Drawing on group emotions theory and affect-infused decision theory, we advance the argument that firms allocate greater resources to philanthropy when headquarters-based employees are in a more positive affective state. We also describe three boundary conditions in this relationship—executives’ embeddedness in the firm, executives’ latitude to engage in philanthropic giving, and the firm’s track record of corporate social irresponsibility. We test our arguments using a longitudinal dataset of philanthropic giving (...)
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  92.  7
    Team Ethical Cultures Within an Organization: A Differentiation Perspective on Their Existence and Relevance.Guillem C. Cabana & Muel Kaptein - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (4):761-780.
    Studies on the ethical culture of organizations have mainly focused on ethical culture at the organizational level. This study explores ethical culture at the team level because this can add a more detailed understanding of the ethics of an organization, which is necessary for more customized and effective management interventions. To find out whether various teams within an organization can have different ethical cultures, we employ the differentiation perspective and conduct a survey of 180 teams from one organization. The results (...)
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  93.  8
    Flawed Like Us and the Starry Moral Law: Review of Machines Like Me by Ian McEwan. [REVIEW]Tae Wan Kim - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (4):875-879.
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  94.  4
    Does Religion Shape Corporate Cost Behavior? [REVIEW]Lijun Ma, Xin Wang & Che Zhang - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (4):835-855.
    Using U.S. listed firms during the period from 1971 to 2010, this paper investigates the effect of religion on corporate cost behavior. We find that religion mitigates cost stickiness induced by agency or behavioral biases of managers. This result holds for several robustness tests that address endogeneity concerns. The mitigating effect of religion on cost stickiness is through the channel of reducing top managers’ overconfidence and optimistic bias regarding future demand change and promoting managers’ adherence to fiduciary responsibilities and consideration (...)
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  95.  3
    Does Religion Shape Corporate Cost Behavior? [REVIEW]Lijun Ma, Xin Wang & Che Zhang - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (4):835-855.
    Using U.S. listed firms during the period from 1971 to 2010, this paper investigates the effect of religion on corporate cost behavior. We find that religion mitigates cost stickiness induced by agency or behavioral biases of managers. This result holds for several robustness tests that address endogeneity concerns. The mitigating effect of religion on cost stickiness is through the channel of reducing top managers’ overconfidence and optimistic bias regarding future demand change and promoting managers’ adherence to fiduciary responsibilities and consideration (...)
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  96.  5
    Exploring the Curvature of the Relationship Between HRM–CSR and Corporate Financial Performance.Olivier Meier, Philippe Naccache & Guillaume Schier - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (4):857-873.
    This article contributes to the general literature on the relationship between corporate social performance and corporate financial performance, as well as to the emerging HRM–CSR literature, by exploring the curvature of the relationship between HRM–CSP and CFP. We advance conceptual arguments in favor of an inverted U-shaped relationship. Our results demonstrate a significant quadratic relationship between HRM–CSP and CFP. We provide evidence that this relationship is not linear or S-shaped but rather inverted U-shaped.
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  97.  11
    Higher Ethical Objective (Maqasid Al-Shari’Ah) Augmented Framework for Islamic Banks: Assessing Ethical Performance and Exploring Its Determinants.Arman Mergaliyev, Mehmet Asutay, Alija Avdukic & Yusuf Karbhari - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (4):797-834.
    This study utilises higher objectives postulated in Islamic moral economy or the maqasid al-Shari’ah theoretical framework’s novel approach in evaluating the ethical, social, environmental and financial performance of Islamic banks. Maqasid al-Shari’ah is interpreted as achieving social good as a consequence in addition to well-being and, hence, it goes beyond traditional social responsibility. This study also explores the major determinants that affect maqasid performance as expressed through disclosure analysis. By expanding the traditional maqasid al-Shari’ah,, we develop a comprehensive evaluation framework (...)
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  98.  7
    Addressing Governance Gaps in Global Value Chains: Introducing a Systematic Typology.Stephanie Schrage & Dirk Ulrich Gilbert - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (4):657-672.
    Multinational enterprises dominate the governance of global value chains, such that according to the concept of political corporate social responsibility, they are responsible to address governance gaps throughout the chains, even at the level of their independent suppliers. In practice, MNEs often struggle to cope with the complexity of these governance gaps, and PCSR does not provide a clear definition nor offer guidance for how to analyze and address them. By adopting the notion of governance mechanisms from GVC literature, this (...)
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  99.  11
    Mapping the Ethicality of Algorithmic Pricing: A Review of Dynamic and Personalized Pricing. [REVIEW]Peter Seele, Claus Dierksmeier, Reto Hofstetter & Mario D. Schultz - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (4):697-719.
    Firms increasingly deploy algorithmic pricing approaches to determine what to charge for their goods and services. Algorithmic pricing can discriminate prices both dynamically over time and personally depending on individual consumer information. Although legal, the ethicality of such approaches needs to be examined as often they trigger moral concerns and sometimes outrage. In this research paper, we provide an overview and discussion of the ethical challenges germane to algorithmic pricing. As a basis for our discussion, we perform a systematic interpretative (...)
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  100.  6
    Towards a Grainier Understanding of How to Encourage Morally Responsible Leadership Through the Development of Phronesis: A Typology of Managerial Phronesis.Francois Steyn & Kosheek Sewchurran - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (4):673-695.
    Aristotle’s philosophical insights into ethics, wisdom and practice have drawn the attention of scholars. In the current professional context where ethics are often compromised, this debate assumes a necessary urgency. This subject is highly relevant to business schools, given the general neglect of this quality in executive management development. Our research involved an analysis of contemporary literature on phronesis in the management scholarship, practice and teaching domains. Our definition of phronesis identifies themes and paradoxes distilled from this literature. Stories are (...)
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  101.  5
    Correction to: Analyzing Leadership Attributes in Faith-Based Organizations: Idealism Versus Reality.Krystin Zigan, YingFei Héliot & Alan Le Grys - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (4):759-759.
    The name of the second author was incorrect in the initial online publication. The original article has been corrected.
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  102.  7
    The Role of Ethical Standards in the Relationship Between Religious Social Norms and M&A Announcement Returns.Leon Zolotoy, Don O’Sullivan & Keke Song - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (4):721-742.
    Prior studies suggest that firms headquartered in areas with strong religious social norms have higher ethical standards. In this study, we examine whether the ethical standards associated with local religious norms influence the M&A announcement returns. We document that the M&A announcement returns of acquirer firms increase with the strength of religious social norms in the area surrounding firms’ headquarters. We also document that the relationship is attenuated when acquirer firms have strong corporate social responsibility credentials, is amplified when public (...)
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  103.  7
    Politicising Government Engagement with Corporate Social Responsibility: “CSR” as an Empty Signifier.Anna Zueva & Jenny Fairbrass - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (4):635-655.
    Governments are widely viewed by academics and practitioners as the key societal actors who are capable of compelling businesses to practice corporate social responsibility. Arguably, such government involvement could be seen as a technocratic device for encouraging ethical business behaviour. In this paper, we offer a more politicised interpretation of government engagement with CSR where “CSR” is not a desired form of business conduct but an element of discourse that governments can deploy in structuring their relationships with other social actors. (...)
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  104.  8
    International Investment Agreements and the Escalation of Private Power in the Global Agri-Food System.Anna Clare Bull, Jagjit Plahe & Lachlan Gregory - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):519-533.
    Using food regime analysis, this paper critically analyzes how corporate actors amass, secure and apply power in the global agrifood system through International Investment Agreements. IIAs are a key enabler of increasing corporate power in the agrifood system. We focus on three sets of investment provisions in IIAs: the stringent enforceability mechanism of the investor-state dispute settlement system, the expansion of the concept of expropriation, and limitations or prohibitions on host countries to impose performance requirements on foreign investors. We argue (...)
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  105.  8
    Does A Trusted Leader Always Behave Better? The Relationship Between Leader Feeling Trusted by Employees and Benevolent and Laissez-Faire Leadership Behaviors.Xingwen Chen, Zheng Zhu & Jun Liu - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):615-634.
    The concept of _feeling trusted_, which has received far less attention from researchers than _trusting_, refers to the trustee’s awareness of trustor’s exposed vulnerability and positive expectations. Previous research has merely centered on employees’ feeling of being trusted by their leaders and its influences on their work-related outcomes, but there is little work about the impact of leader feeling trusted by employees. Grounded in social exchange theory and moral licensing theory, the current research centers on explaining why leaders’ sense of (...)
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  106.  13
    Moral Development in Business Ethics: An Examination and Critique.Kristen Bell DeTienne, Carol Frogley Ellertson, Marc-Charles Ingerson & William R. Dudley - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):429-448.
    The field of behavioral ethics has seen considerable growth over the last few decades. One of the most significant concerns facing this interdisciplinary field of research is the moral judgment-action gap. The moral judgment-action gap is the inconsistency people display when they know what is right but do what they know is wrong. Much of the research in the field of behavioral ethics is based on early work in moral psychology and American psychologist Lawrence Kohlberg’s foundational cognitive model of moral (...)
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  107.  16
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Financial Fraud: The Moderating Effects of Governance and Religiosity.Xing Li, Jeong-Bon Kim, Haibin Wu & Yangxin Yu - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):557-576.
    This study investigates how managers in firms that have committed fraud strategically use socially responsible activities in coordination with their fraudulent financial reporting practices. Using propensity score matching to select control firms that have a similar probability of fraud in the pre-fraud benchmark period, we find that the corporate social responsibility performance of fraudulent firms in the fraud-committing period is significantly higher compared with the CSR performance of non-fraudulent control firms during this period, and compared with that during their own (...)
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  108.  11
    Are Politically Endorsed Firms More Socially Responsible? Selective Engagement in Corporate Social Responsibility.Xiaowei Rose Luo & Danqing Wang - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):535-555.
    The state plays a major role in corporate social responsibility in emerging and transitional economies and often influences firms through political connection, and hence knowing how firms respond to the state’s CSR initiatives can inform policy making and has important implication on the sustainability of society and environment. However, existent studies show conflicting results on politically connected firms’ CSR participation. We examine the relationship between political endorsement and firms’ engagement in different types of CSR simultaneously. Using a representative sample of (...)
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  109.  6
    The Carrot or the Stick: Self-Regulation for Gender-Diverse Boards Via Codes of Good Governance.Heike Mensi-Klarbach, Stephan Leixnering & Michael Schiffinger - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):577-593.
    Scholars have emphasized the potential of self-regulation, realized through ‘codes of good governance’, to improve gender diversity on boards. Yet, unconvinced of the effectiveness of this self-regulation, many regulators have implemented mandatory quota laws. Our study sheds light on this dilemma. Seeking to broaden our conceptual knowledge of how such ‘codes’ work in the specific case of gender diversity on boards, we ask: Under which conditions is self-regulation via voluntary principles of good governance effective? Expanding recent institutional-theory perspectives from the (...)
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  110.  27
    A Normative Meaning of Meaningful Work.Christopher Michaelson - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):413-428.
    Research on meaningful work has not embraced a shared definition of what it is, in part because many researchers and laypersons agree that it means different things to different people. However, subjective and social accounts of meaningful work have limited practical value to help people pursue it and to help scholars study it. The account of meaningful work advanced in this paper is inherently normative. It recognizes the relevance of subjective experience and social agreement to appraisals of meaningfulness but considers (...)
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  111.  7
    Does It Pay to Invest in Japanese Women? Evidence From the MSCI Japan Empowering Women Index.Jonathan Peillex, Sabri Boubaker & Breeda Comyns - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):595-613.
    In Japan, income, authority, and prestige are unequally distributed between men and women, even if they share the same occupational level. These inequalities are perceived as an ethical issue because they go against the principle of equal treatment at work. Nowadays, Japanese companies are under growing political and regulatory pressure to increase the hiring, promotion, and empowerment of female employees. In this context, the first equity index that tracks the financial performance of the best Japanese companies in terms of gender (...)
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  112.  4
    The Effects of Immigration on Labour Tax Avoidance: An Empirical Spatial Analysis.Diego Ravenda, Maika M. Valencia-Silva, Josep M. Argiles-Bosch & Josep García-Blandón - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):471-496.
    We investigate whether the geographic concentration of non-EU immigrants in the various Italian provinces affects labour tax avoidance practices adopted by firms located in the same provinces, as well as in the neighbouring provinces, and operating in construction and agriculture industries that mostly employ immigrants in Italy. For this purpose, we develop a LTAV proxy based on the financial accounting information of a sample of 993,606 firm-years, disseminated throughout the 108 Italian provinces, over the period 2008–2016. Our results, based on (...)
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  113.  12
    Not All Followers Socially Learn from Ethical Leaders: The Roles of Followers’ Moral Identity and Leader Identification in the Ethical Leadership Process.Zhen Wang, Lu Xing, Haoying Xu & Sean T. Hannah - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):449-469.
    Recent literature suggests that ethical leadership helps to inhibit followers’ unethical behavior, largely built on the premise that followers view ethical leaders as ethical role models and socially learn from them, thereby engaging in more ethical conduct. This premise, however, has not been adequately tested, leaving insufficient understanding concerning the conditions under which this social learning process occurs. In this study, we revisit this premise, theorizing that not all followers will equally regard the same ethical leader as being a personal (...)
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  114.  12
    Dealing with Ethical Dilemmas: A Look at Financial Reporting by Firms Facing Product Harm Crises.Shafu Zhang, Like Jiang, Michel Magnan & Lixin Nancy Su - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):497-518.
    A product harm crisis undermines a firm’s reputation as well as its managers’ career outlook. To shake off the stigmatization resulting from the PHC and regain a firm’s legitimacy among stakeholders, managers usually face an ethical dilemma as they choose to be transparent about the crisis’ financial implications or to obfuscate them to neutralize the negative impact of the PHC. We find evidence that managers engage in income-increasing earnings management when their firms experience PHCs. Moreover, while income-increasing earnings management in (...)
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  115.  7
    The Morality of “New” CEO Activism.Layla Branicki, Stephen Brammer, Alison Pullen & Carl Rhodes - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (2):269-285.
    CEOs’ social and environmental activism attracts significant public and research interest. Positioned as an expression of personal morality, such activism is potentially highly influential because of CEOs’ public visibility and associated positional and resource-based power. This paper questions the assumption that CEO activism can only be explained in relation to individual moral action, and illuminates its wider social implications. We critically evaluate the recent upsurge in CEO activism by juxtaposing it against broader social activism, identifying its distinctive characteristics, and empirically (...)
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  116.  9
    Harnessing Multidimensional Legitimacy for Codes of Ethics: A Staged Approach.Hugh Breakey - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (2):359-373.
    How can codes of ethics acquire legitimacy—that is, how can they lay down obligations that will be seen by their subjects as morally binding? There are many answers to this question, reflecting the fact that moral agents have a host of different bases on which they may acknowledge code duties as ethically binding—or, alternatively, may reject those duties as morally irrelevant or actively corrupt. Drawing on a wide literature on legitimacy in other practical fields, this paper develops a multidimensional legitimacy (...)
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  117.  15
    Constrained Morality in the Professional Work of Corporate Lawyers.Dawn Yi Lin Chow & Thomas Calvard - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (2):213-228.
    In this article, we contribute to sociological literatures on morality, professional and institutional contexts, and morally stigmatized ‘dirty work’ by emphasizing and exploring how they mutually inform one another in lawyers’ work activities. Drawing on interview data with 58 practitioners in the commercial legal industry in Singapore, we analyze how they experience professional and institutional constraints on the expressions of morality in their work. Our findings illustrate how a dominant managerial and economic focus maintains and reproduces a constrained form of (...)
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  118.  25
    From Black Pain to Rhodes Must Fall: A Rejectionist Perspective.Rashedur Chowdhury - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (2):287-311.
    Based on my study of the Rhodes Must Fall movement, I develop a rejectionist perspective by identifying the understanding and mobilization of epistemic disobedience as the core premise of such a perspective. Embedded in this contextual perspective, epistemic disobedience refers to the decolonization of the self and a fight against colonial legacies. I argue that, rather than viewing a rejectionist perspective as a threat, it should be integrated into the moral learning of contemporary institutions and businesses. This approach is important (...)
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  119.  10
    From Credit Risk to Social Impact: On the Funding Determinants in Interest-Free Peer-to-Peer Lending.Gregor Dorfleitner, Eva-Maria Oswald & Rongxin Zhang - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (2):375-400.
    Based on a unique data set on US direct microloans, we study the funding determinants of interest-free peer-to-peer crowdlending aimed at borrowers in the US. By performing logistic regressions on funding success and Tobit regressions on the reversed funding time, the existence of a social underwriting by a third-party trustee and information in the description texts fostering the investors’ trust are shown to be the main predictors of successful funding. Regarding social impact, the possibility to empower women and groups of (...)
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  120.  6
    Adam Smith and Catholic Social Teaching.Nuno Ornelas Martins - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (2):401-411.
    The connections between Adam Smith and Catholic Social Teaching raise several questions. The principle of subsidiarity adopted in CST, according to which higher associations should not replace subordinate organizations on what the latter can do, seems to be in line with the idea that governmental intervention in the market sphere should be restricted to the minimum required, in line with what is typically seen as Smith’s view. But the principle of the common good would also recommend intervention from political authorities (...)
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  121.  9
    Is the Market Perceived to be Civilizing or Destructive? Scientists’ Universalism Values and Their Attitudes Towards Patents.Jared L. Peifer, David R. Johnson & Elaine Howard Ecklund - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (2):253-267.
    Is the market civilizing or destructive? The increased salience of science commercialization is forcing scientists to address this question. Benefiting from the sociology of morality literature’s increased attention to specific kinds of morality and engaging with economic sociology’s moral markets literature, we generate competing hypotheses about scientists’ value-driven attitudes toward patenting. The Civilizing Market thesis suggests scientists who prioritize universalism will tend to support patenting. The Destructive Market thesis, by contrast, suggests universalism will be correlated with opposition to patenting. We (...)
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  122.  20
    New Moralities for New Media? Assessing the Role of Social Media in Acts of Terror and Providing Points of Deliberation for Business Ethics.Ateeq Abdul Rauf - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (2):229-251.
    New media and technologies such as social media and online platforms are disrupting the way businesses are run and how society functions. This article advises that scholars consider the morality of new media as an area of investigation. While prior literature has given much attention to how social media provides benefits, how it affects society generally, and how it can be used efficiently, research on the ethical aspects of new media has received relatively less attention. In an age where matters (...)
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  123.  28
    Are Liberated Companies a Concrete Application of Sen’s Capability Approach?Roberta Sferrazzo & Renato Ruffini - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (2):329-342.
    The capability approach developed by Amartya Sen focuses on the enhancement of people’s capabilities, i.e. their real freedom to choose a life course they have reason to value. Applying the CA to the organizational context, the focus of human resource management is transformed, shifting away from the needs of the organization to the freedoms of the individual. This shift happens also inside the so-called ‘liberated companies,’ firms with an organizational form that allows employees the complete freedom, along with the responsibility, (...)
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  124.  9
    Opening Constructive Dialogues Between Business Ethics Research and the Sociology of Morality: Introduction to the Thematic Symposium.Masoud Shadnam, Andrey Bykov & Ajnesh Prasad - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (2):201-211.
    Over the last decade, scholars across the wide spectrum of the discipline of sociology have started to reengage with questions on morality and moral phenomena. The continued wave of research in this field, which has come to be known as the new sociology of morality, is a lively research program that has several common grounds with scholarship in the field of business ethics. The aim of this thematic symposium is to open constructive dialogues between these two areas of study. In (...)
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  125.  7
    B Corp Certification and Its Impact on Organizations Over Time.Malu Villela, Sergio Bulgacov & Glenn Morgan - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (2):343-357.
    This study explores the impact of B Corp certification and its associated impact assessment on four case studies of small and medium-sized Brazilian companies certified as B Corps. The results reveal that although all companies had achieved high scores in the certification assessment, awarded on the basis of existing performance, they did not subsequently develop road maps for the future to improve their scores in the way which the B Corp Impact Assessment process endorses as one of the benefits of (...)
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  126.  4
    B Corp Certification and Its Impact on Organizations Over Time.Malu Villela, Sergio Bulgacov & Glenn Morgan - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (2):343-357.
    This study explores the impact of B Corp certification and its associated impact assessment on four case studies of small and medium-sized Brazilian companies certified as B Corps. The results reveal that although all companies had achieved high scores in the certification assessment, awarded on the basis of existing performance, they did not subsequently develop road maps for the future to improve their scores in the way which the B Corp Impact Assessment process endorses as one of the benefits of (...)
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  127.  7
    An Agonistic Notion of Political CSR: Melding Activism and Deliberation.Cedric E. Dawkins - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (1):5-19.
    Flagging labor governance in far-flung supply networks has prompted greater scrutiny of instrumental CSR and calls for models that are tethered more closely to accountability, constraint, and oversight. Political CSR is an apt response, but this paper seeks to buttress its deliberative moorings by arguing that the agonist notion of ‘domesticated conflict’ provides a necessary foundation for substantive deliberation. Because deliberation is more viable and effective when coupled with some means of coercion, a concept of CSR solely premised on reciprocal (...)
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  128.  6
    Review of The Time Is Now: Developing Leaders for Today's Organizations of Color by Cassandra Y. Owens and Helen J. Owens: Dr. Nes International Consulting & Publishing, Columbia, SC, 2020, x + 135 pp., ISBN: 978-1-949461-12-1. [REVIEW]Vickie Cox Edmondson - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (1):195-199.
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  129.  10
    Consumer Reactions to Tax Avoidance: Evidence from the United States and Germany.Inga Hardeck, J. William Harden & David R. Upton - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (1):75-96.
    This research investigates the impact of corporate tax strategies on consumers’ corporate social responsibility perceptions, willingness to pay, and attitude toward the firm in two laboratory experiments in the United States and Germany. Using the Becker–DeGroot–Marschak incentive-compatible mechanism, which avoids a social desirability bias found in prior research, our results indicate only a minor indirect effect of corporate tax strategies on WTP by way of the mediator CSR perceptions. However, we find a strong effect on attitude toward the firm again (...)
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  130.  8
    Reconnecting to the Social in Business Ethics.Gazi Islam & Michelle Greenwood - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (1):1-4.
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  131.  11
    Corporate Social Responsibility as Obligated Internalisation of Social Costs.Andrew Johnston, Kenneth Amaeshi, Emmanuel Adegbite & Onyeka Osuji - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (1):39-52.
    We propose that corporations should be subject to a legal obligation to identify and internalise their social costs or negative externalities. Our proposal reframes corporate social responsibility as obligated internalisation of social costs, and relies on reflexive governance through mandated hybrid fora. We argue that our approach advances theory, as well as practice and policy, by building on and going beyond prior attempts to address social costs, such as prescriptive government regulation, Coasian bargaining and political CSR.
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  132.  11
    Reducing Accounting Aggressiveness with General Ethical Norms and Decision Structure.Khim Kelly & Pamela R. Murphy - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (1):97-113.
    We examine the impact of activated versus non-activated ethical norms on the aggressiveness of accounting decisions, in the presence of self-interest favoring aggressiveness. Using a case in which the accounting rules are ambiguous, we ask professional accountants to make an accounting decision as though they were in their own organization; we measure the ethical norms of their organization at the end of the experiment. Based on the focus theory of normative conduct, we argue that the general ethical norms of the (...)
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  133.  12
    Firms Talk, Suppliers Walk: Analyzing the Locus of Greenwashing in the Blame Game and Introducing ‘Vicarious Greenwashing’.Marta Pizzetti, Lucia Gatti & Peter Seele - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (1):21-38.
    Greenwashing is a phenomenon that is linked to scandals that often occur at the supply-chain level. Nevertheless, research on this subject remains in its infancy; much more is needed to advance our understanding of stakeholders’ reactions to greenwashing. We propose here a new typology of greenwashing, based on the locus of discrepancy, i.e. the point along the supply-chain where the discrepancy between ‘responsible words’ and ‘irresponsible walks’ occurs. With three experiments, we tested how the different forms of greenwashing affect stakeholders’ (...)
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  134.  5
    Firms Talk, Suppliers Walk: Analyzing the Locus of Greenwashing in the Blame Game and Introducing ‘Vicarious Greenwashing’.Marta Pizzetti, Lucia Gatti & Peter Seele - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (1):21-38.
    Greenwashing is a phenomenon that is linked to scandals that often occur at the supply-chain level. Nevertheless, research on this subject remains in its infancy; much more is needed to advance our understanding of stakeholders’ reactions to greenwashing. We propose here a new typology of greenwashing, based on the locus of discrepancy, i.e. the point along the supply-chain where the discrepancy between ‘responsible words’ and ‘irresponsible walks’ occurs. With three experiments, we tested how the different forms of greenwashing affect stakeholders’ (...)
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  135.  6
    Humility Harmonized? Exploring Whether and How Leader and Employee Humility (In)Congruence Influences Employee Citizenship and Deviance Behaviors.Xin Qin, Xin Liu, Jacob A. Brown, Xiaoming Zheng & Bradley P. Owens - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (1):147-165.
    Various studies have recognized the importance of humility as a foundational aspect of virtuous leadership and have revealed the beneficial effects of leader humility on employee moral attitudes and behaviors. However, these findings may overestimate the benefits of leader humility and overlook its potential costs. Integrating person–supervisor fit theory and balance theory with the humility literature, we employ a dyadic approach to consider supervisor and employee humility simultaneously. We investigate whether and how the congruence of supervisor and employee humility influences (...)
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  136.  8
    A Developmental Model for Educating Wise Leaders: The Role of Mindfulness and Habitus in Creating Time for Embodying Wisdom.David Rooney, Wendelin Küpers, David Pauleen & Ekatarina Zhuravleva - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (1):181-194.
    This article brings together mindfulness and habitus theory in relation to developing wise leaders. In particular, we present new insights about the intersection of time, subjective and intersubjective experience, and mindfulness that are relevant to developing embodied wisdom in leaders. We show that temporal competence is essential for shaping habitus and developing embodied wisdom. Further, and to extend theoretical understandings of mindfulness in leadership, we argue that temporal capabilities developed through mindfulness can foster embodied wisdom by creating a specific ‘wisdom (...)
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  137.  6
    Greasing Dirty Machines: Evidence of Pollution-Driven Bribery in China.Yanlei Zhang - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (1):53-74.
    Environmental pollution has become a serious challenge in emerging markets. Using a unique survey of privately owned enterprises in China, this paper investigates how polluting firms respond to institutional pressures. We find that polluting firms conform to external pressures by combining relational activities and clean technology investments. However, some polluting firms alleviate regulative pressures by bribing government officials, which represents an unethical relational strategy to manage political relationship. We further analyze the contingency on firm-level political connection and local institutional conditions. (...)
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  138.  26
    The Impact of Authoritarian Leadership on Ethical Voice: A Moderated Mediation Model of Felt Uncertainty and Leader Benevolence.Yuyan Zheng, Les Graham, Jiing-Lih Farh & Xu Huang - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (1):133-146.
    In a sample of 522 police officers and staff in an English police force, we investigated the role of authoritarian leadership in reducing the levels of employee ethical voice. Drawing upon uncertainty management theory, we found that authoritarian leadership was negatively related to employee ethical voice through increased levels of felt uncertainty, when the effects of a motivational-based mechanism suggested by previous studies were controlled. In addition, we found that the negative relationship between authoritarian leadership and employee ethical voice via (...)
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  139.  4
    Unveiling (In)Vulnerability in an Adolescent’s Consumption Subculture: A Framework to Understand Adolescents’ Experienced (In)Vulnerability and Ethical Implications.Wided Batat & John F. Tanner - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (4):713-730.
    Consumer vulnerability is studied via a quasi-ethnographic longitudinal study of adolescents aged 11–15. The study focuses on how adolescents define their vulnerabilities within their adolescent consumption subcultures, the factors enhancing this vulnerability, and the social actors involved in their experience of vulnerability. The findings contribute to consumer vulnerability literature in three ways. First, by adopting an adolescent-centric approach based on an emic perspective, we go beyond the monolithic approach of studying one source of vulnerability at a time seen in present (...)
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  140.  7
    Don’T Pass Them By: Figuring the Sacred in Organizational Values Work.Gry Espedal & Arne Carlsen - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (4):767-784.
    How and why could some stories be construed as sacred in organizations, and what functions does the sacred have in organizational values work? Research has shown how values can be made formative of a range of organizational purposes and forms but has underscored their performative, situated, and agentic nature. We address that void by studying the sacred as a potentially salient yet under-researched realm of values work. Drawing on an ethnographic case study of a faith-based health care organization and the (...)
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  141.  12
    Social Status and Corporate Social Responsibility: Evidence from Chinese Privately Owned Firms.Yang Liu, Weiqi Dai, Mingqing Liao & Jiang Wei - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (4):651-672.
    In countries such as China, where Confucianism is the backbone of national culture, high-social-status entrepreneurs are inclined to engage in corporate social responsibility activities due to the perceived high stress from stakeholders and high ability of doing CSR. Based on a large-scale survey of private enterprises in China, our paper finds that Chinese entrepreneurs at private firms who have high social status are prone to engage in social responsibility efforts. In addition, high-social-status Chinese entrepreneurs are even more likely to engage (...)
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  142.  11
    Curbing the Undesirable Effects of Emotional Exhaustion on Ethical Behaviors and Performance: A Salesperson–Manager Dyadic Approach.Bruno Lussier, Nathaniel N. Hartmann & Willy Bolander - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (4):747-766.
    Recent events and popularized stereotypes call into question the ethics of salesperson behaviors. Although prior research demonstrates that salespeople’s emotional exhaustion can have negative consequences for several job outcomes, little is known about the factors that can mitigate such relationships—particularly the relationship between emotional exhaustion and ethical behavior. To remedy this knowledge gap, we draw from self-control theory to propose a novel theoretical framework and develop hypotheses. These hypotheses are tested on a unique dataset consisting of survey data collected from (...)
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  143.  3
    A New Research Horizon for Mass Entrepreneurship Policy and Chinese Firms’ CSR: Introduction to the Thematic Symposium. [REVIEW]Zhenzhong Ma & Maoliang Bu - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (4):603-607.
    While China has experienced an unprecedented growth over the past decades, sustainability has become a major concern for policymakers and management practitioners. Consideration has been given to the convergence of mass entrepreneurship and innovation as a new economic driver and sustainability as a long-term economic objective. The focus of China’s economic development has moved from a resource-based expansion to a more entrepreneurial and socially responsible one. This is a timely and critical topic that captures the increasing concerns over sustainability and (...)
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  144.  5
    To Erect Temples to Virtue: Effects of State Mindfulness on Other-Focused Ethical Behaviors.Davide C. Orazi, Jiemiao Chen & Eugene Y. Chan - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (4):785-798.
    While prior research suggests a link between mindfulness and ethical decision-making, most of the evidence for this link is correlational and refers to self-focused ethical behaviors. The paucity of experimental evidence, coupled with a lack of clarity on what mechanisms underlie the effect, limits our understanding of whether and how mindfulness might foster other-focused ethical behaviors. In this research, we hypothesize that state mindfulness might promote other-focused ethical behaviors by increasing resourcefulness, which we define as a perceived state of resource (...)
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  145.  20
    Their Pain, Our Pleasure: How and When Peer Abusive Supervision Leads to Third Parties’ Schadenfreude and Work Engagement.Yueqiao Qiao, Zhe Zhang & Ming Jia - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (4):695-711.
    Abusive supervision negatively affects its direct victims. However, recent studies have begun to explore how abusive supervision affects third parties. We use the emotion-based process model of schadenfreude as a basis to suggest that third parties will experience schadenfreude and increase their work engagement as a response to peer abusive supervision. Furthermore, we suggest that the context of competitive goal interdependence facilitates the indirect relationship between PAS and third parties’ work engagement on schadenfreude. We use a mixed-method approach to test (...)
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  146.  5
    Removing the Blinders: Increasing Students’ Awareness of Self-Perception Biases and Real-World Ethical Challenges Through an Educational Intervention.Kathleen A. Tomlin, Matthew L. Metzger & Jill Bradley-Geist - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (4):731-746.
    Business ethics educators strive to produce graduates who not only grasp the principles of ethical decision-making, but who can apply that business ethics education when faced with real-world challenges. However, this has proven especially difficult, as good intentions do not always translate into ethical awareness and action. Complementing a behavioral ethics approach with insights from social psychology, we developed an interventional class module with both online and in-class elements aimed at increasing students’ awareness of their own susceptibility to unconscious biases (...)
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  147.  9
    Collide or Collaborate: The Interplay of Competing Logics and Institutional Work in Cross-Sector Social Partnerships.Juelin Yin & Dima Jamali - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (4):673-694.
    An increasing body of institutional research has examined organizations’ response to conflicting institutional logics, but few studies have looked into how cross-sector organizational actors experiencing institutional complexity strategize their response mechanisms to create value in the context of corporate social responsibility. We conduct a comparative case study of nine social partnerships between multinational companies and nonprofits in China. We identify a partnership logic among the value-creating partnerships where partners guided by an either/and mindset take joint ownership of the social or (...)
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  148.  10
    Echoes of CEO Entrepreneurial Orientation: How and When CEO Entrepreneurial Orientation Influences Dual CSR Activities.Zhe Zhang, Xin Wang & Ming Jia - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (4):609-629.
    We explore the potential impact of CEO entrepreneurial orientation on firm choice of CSR activities. Integrating upper echelon theory and attention-based view of the firm, we find that CEO entrepreneurial orientation leads to more engagement in CSR innovation rather than corporate philanthropy. We find that the effect of CEO entrepreneurial orientation on firm choice of CSR activities varies under two situational contexts: state-owned enterprises and incoming/departing CEO. The hypotheses are tested using two different studies. Study 1 uses a cross-sectional survey (...)
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  149.  9
    Looking Backward and Forward: Political Links and Environmental Corporate Social Responsibility in China.Peng Zhou, Felix Arndt, Kun Jiang & Weiqi Dai - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (4):631-649.
    This study aims to enrich our understanding of the relationship between political connections and the adoption of environmental corporate socially responsible investments. In addition to the individual-level political connections, i.e., entrepreneurs’ personal ties to government officials, we propose in China the creation of Communist Party of China branches in privately owned firms serve as organizational and institutionalized dimensions of political connection building. Drawing on the social exchange theory, this paper details how CPC branches function in privately owned firms and how (...)
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  150.  19
    The Impact of Proximity on Consumer Fair Trade Engagement and Purchasing Behavior: The Moderating Role of Empathic Concern and Hypocrisy.Alvina Gillani, Smirti Kutaula, Leonidas C. Leonidou & Paul Christodoulides - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (3):557-577.
    The article reports the findings of an empirical study among consumers, regarding the impact of physical, social, and psychological proximity on their engagement to the fair trade idea and purchasing behavior. Based on a random sample of 211 British and 112 Indian consumers and using structural equation modeling, it was found that high levels of physical, social, and psychological proximity leads to high consumer fair trade engagement. Moreover, consumer fair trade engagement was confirmed to have a positive impact on fair (...)
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  151.  11
    Harmful Stakeholder Strategies.Jeffrey S. Harrison & Andrew C. Wicks - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (3):405-419.
    Stakeholder theory focuses on how more value is created if stakeholder relationships are governed by ethical principles such as integrity, respect, fairness, generosity and inclusiveness. However, it has not adequately addressed strategies that stakeholders perceive as harmful to their interests and how this perception can even lead some stakeholders to view the firm’s strategies as unethical. To fill the void, this paper directly addresses strategies that stakeholders perceive as harmful to their interests, or what we refer to as harmful stakeholder (...)
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  152.  9
    Contentious Dynamics Within the Social Turbulence of Environmental (In)justice Surrounding Wind Energy Farms in Oaxaca, Mexico.Jacobo Ramirez - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (3):387-404.
    Businesses and governments in postcolonial countries frame investments in wind energy as efforts to address climate change and sustainable development. However, when wind energy projects encroach on indigenous peoples’ lives and land, there is often a lack of recognition and participation of these peoples and an unequal distribution of cost and benefits of such projects toward them, which leads to opposition against wind energy projects and often triggers conflicts for justice. Worryingly, such conditions have repeatedly resulted in the assassination of (...)
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  153.  7
    Women and Multiple Board Memberships: Social Capital and Institutional Pressure.Alessandra Rigolini & Morten Huse - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (3):443-459.
    We show unintended consequences of quota regulations to get women on boards. Board members may have different characteristics, and even among women, there are variations. We assume that the characteristics of the board members have an influence on their contributions to boards, to businesses as well as to society. In this paper, we argue that different types of societal pressure to get women on boards have an influence on the social capital characteristics of the women getting multiple board memberships. The (...)
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  154.  7
    Can Inclusion in Religious Index Membership Mitigate Earnings Management?Abdullah Alsaadi - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (2):333-354.
    This paper investigates whether religious-based index membership is important in mitigating earnings management. Using a large sample of firms domiciled across 12 European countries, our empirical results show that firms included in the Shariah-compliant index, as a proxy for religious index, are more likely to engage in accruals manipulation vis-a-vis non-Shariah-compliant firms. Our results are robust using the Heckman two-stage treatment effect model, weighted least squares model, alternative earnings quality metrics and after controlling for the potential effects of home-country characteristics. (...)
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  155.  9
    The Value of Character-Based Judgement in the Professional Domain.James Arthur, Stephen R. Earl, Aidan P. Thompson & Joseph W. Ward - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (2):293-308.
    Dimensions of character are often overlooked in professional practice at the expense of the development of technical competence and operational efficiency. Drawing on philosophical accounts of virtue ethics and positive psychology, the present work attempts to elevate the role of ‘good’ character in the professional domain. A ‘good’ professional is ideally one that exemplifies dimensions of character informed by sound judgement. A total of 2340 professionals, from five discrete professions, were profiled based on their valuation of qualities pertaining to character (...)
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  156.  9
    How Nationalistic Appeals Affect Foreign Luxury Brand Reputation: A Study of Ambivalent Effects.Boris Bartikowski, Fernando Fastoso & Heribert Gierl - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (2):261-277.
    Drawing from cognitive learning theories we hypothesize that exposure to nationalistic appeals that suggest consumers should shun foreign brands for moral reasons increases the general belief in consumers that buying foreign brands is morally wrong. In parallel, drawing from the theory of psychological reactance we posit that such appeals may, against their communication goal, increase the reputation of foreign luxury brands. We term the juxtaposition of these apparently contradictory effects the “Ambivalence Hypothesis.” Further, drawing from prior research on source-similarity effects (...)
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  157.  11
    CSR Actions, Brand Value, and Willingness to Pay a Premium Price for Luxury Brands: Does Long-Term Orientation Matter?Mbaye Fall Diallo, Norchène Ben Dahmane Mouelhi, Mahesh Gadekar & Marie Schill - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (2):241-260.
    Sustainable luxury is a strategic issue for managers and for society, yet it remains poorly understood. This research seeks to clarify how corporate social responsibility actions directly and indirectly affect consumers’ willingness to pay a premium price for luxury brand products, as well as how a long-term orientation might moderate these relationships. A scenario study presents fictional CSR actions of two brands, representing different luxury products, to 1,049 respondents from two countries. The results of a structural equation modeling approach show (...)
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  158.  12
    Effects of Internal–External Congruence-Based CSR Positioning: An Attribution Theory Approach.Whitney Ginder, Wi-Suk Kwon & Sang-Eun Byun - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (2):355-369.
    Although corporate social responsibility appears to be mutually beneficial for companies and consumers, the modern marketplace has left both parties in vulnerable positions. Consumers are increasingly subjected to incongruent CSR messages such as greenwashing, while companies are trapped in a strategic positioning dilemma with regard to how to most effectively and ethically approach CSR communication. This has led some companies to instead adopt a strategically silent approach, such as greenhushing. To capture this CSR positioning dilemma and test the positioning effects (...)
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  159.  8
    Constructing Personas: How High-Net-Worth Social Media Influencers Reconcile Ethicality and Living a Luxury Lifestyle.Marina Leban, Thyra Uth Thomsen, Sylvia von Wallpach & Benjamin G. Voyer - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (2):225-239.
    Drawing from a multi-sourced data corpus gathered from high-net-worth social media influencers, this article explores how these individuals reconcile ethicality and living a luxury lifestyle through the enactment of three types of personas on Instagram: Ambassador of ‘True’ Luxury, Altruist, and ‘Good’ Role Model. By applying the concepts of taste regimes and social moral licensing, we find that HNW social media influencers conspicuously enact and display ethicality, thereby retaining legitimacy in the field of luxury consumption. As these individuals are highly (...)
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  160.  5
    Perspectives, Opportunities and Tensions in Ethical and Sustainable Luxury: Introduction to the Thematic Symposium.Victoria-Sophie Osburg, Iain Davies, Vignesh Yoganathan & Fraser McLeay - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (2):201-210.
    Scholars agree that the environmental and societal impacts of consumption require greater attention, and need examining in more diverse market contexts. This editorial essay focuses on the nascent area of ethical/sustainable luxury, and critically considers how the scope of ethical/sustainable consumption can be broadened in the luxury sector. We address the compatibility of ethicality/sustainability and luxury by examining a range of opportunities and inherent tensions in relation to improving the ethical/sustainable consumption practices within the luxury sector. We also introduce several (...)
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  161.  7
    Distinct Effects of Pride and Gratitude Appeals on Sustainable Luxury Brands.Felix Septianto, Yuri Seo & Amy Christine Errmann - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (2):211-224.
    This study synthesizes research on evolutionary psychology, emotional appeals, and viral advertising in order to develop a novel perspective on how sustainable luxury brands can be effectively promoted on social media. The results of two experiments show that the emotional appeals of pride and gratitude increase consumer intentions to spread electronic word-of-mouth about sustainable luxury brands via two discrete mechanisms. Study 1 establishes that featuring the pride appeal increases eWOM intentions by heightening the luxury dimension of sustainable luxury brands, whereas (...)
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  162.  6
    Knock, Knock: The Taxman’s at Your Door! Practice Sense, Empathy Games, and Dilemmas in Tax Enforcement.Carlene Beth Wynter & Lynne Oats - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (2):279-292.
    Tax administrators are empowered by the state to secure compliance with tax obligations. Enforcing compliance on the ground is complex, and street-level administrators often engage in the “art of the possible,” leading to dilemmas in the field. This paper examines tax administrators’ practices with regard to Jamaican property tax defaulters with outstanding tax liabilities in excess of 3 years. Drawing on interviews with tax administrators and other key agents, we find that tax administrators reposition themselves from objective enforcers to empathizing (...)
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  163.  11
    How and When Does Socially Responsible HRM Affect Employees’ Organizational Citizenship Behaviors Toward the Environment?Hongdan Zhao, Qiongyao Zhou, Peixu He & Cuiling Jiang - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (2):371-385.
    Based on the person-organization fit theory, this research aims to investigate how socially responsible HRM positively affects employees’ organizational citizenship behaviors toward the environment by increasing person-organization fit. This study also captures the moderating effect of the perceived role of ethics and social responsibility in influencing the indirect effect of SRHRM on OCBE via person-organization fit. Data were collected from 302 employees in a state-owned chain hotel in Shanghai, China. The results indicated that SRHRM indirectly influenced employee’s engagement in OCBE (...)
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  164.  6
    Care-Ful Work: An Ethics of Care Approach to Contingent Labour in the Creative Industries.Ana Alacovska & Joëlle Bissonnette - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (1):135-151.
    Studies of creative industries typically contend that creative work is profoundly precarious, taking place on a freelance basis in highly competitive, individualized and contingent labour markets. Such studies depict creative workers as correspondingly self-enterprising, self-reliant, self-interested and calculative agents who valorise care-free independence. In contrast, we adopt the ‘ethics of care’ approach to explore, recognize and appreciate the communitarian, relational and moral considerations as well as interpersonal connectedness and interdependencies that underpin creative work. Drawing on in-depth interviews with creative workers (...)
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  165. Sweatshops, Structural Injustice, and the Wrong of Exploitation: Why Multinational Corporations Have Positive Duties to the Global Poor.Brian Berkey - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (1):43-56.
    It is widely thought that firms that employ workers in “sweatshop” conditions wrongfully exploit those workers. This claim has been challenged by those who argue that because companies are not obligated to hire their workers in the first place, employing them cannot be wrong so long as they voluntarily accept their jobs and genuinely benefit from them. In this article, I argue that we can maintain that at least many sweatshop employees are wrongfully exploited, while accepting the plausible claim at (...)
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  166.  18
    Sweatshops, Harm, and Interference: A Contractualist Approach.Huseyin S. Kuyumcuoglu - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (1):1-11.
    Activists and progressive governments sometimes interfere in the working conditions of sweatshops. Their methods may include boycotts of the products produced in these facilities, bans on the import of these products or tariffs imposed by the home country, and enforcing the host country’s laws that aim at regulating sweatshops. Some argue that such interference in sweatshop conditions is morally wrong since it may actually harm workers. The reason is that the enterprise that runs the sweatshop may choose to lay off (...)
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  167.  13
    Labour Force Participation and Employment of Humanitarian Migrants: Evidence from the Building a New Life in Australia Longitudinal Data.Zhiming Cheng, Ben Zhe Wang & Lucy Taksa - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (4):697-720.
    This study uses the longitudinal data from the Building a New Life in Australia survey to examine the relationships between human capital and labour market participation and employment status among recently arrived/approved humanitarian migrants. We find that the likelihood of participating in the labour force is higher for those who had pre-immigration paid job experience, completed study/job training and have better job searching knowledge/skills in Australia and possess higher proficiency in spoken English. We find that the chance of getting a (...)
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  168.  16
    Transparency and Control in Email Communication: The More the Supervisor is Put in Cc the Less Trust is Felt.Tessa Haesevoets, David De Cremer, Leander De Schutter, Jack McGuire, Yu Yang, Xie Jian & Alain Van Hiel - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (4):733-753.
    The issue of trust has increasingly attracted attention in the business ethics literature. Our aim is to contribute further to this literature by examining how the use of the carbon copy function in email communication influences felt trust. We develop the argument that the use of cc enhances transparency—representing an important characteristic of workplace ethics—and hence promotes trust. We further argue that a downside of the cc option may be that it can also be experienced as a control mechanism, which (...)
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  169.  21
    Surviving a Crisis: How Crisis Type and Psychological Distance Can Inform Corporate Crisis Responses.So Young Lee, Yoon Hi Sung, Dongwon Choi & Dong Hoo Kim - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (4):795-811.
    This research examines how one’s construal level of a crisis differs by crisis type, and how the interplay of crisis type and apology appeal type impacts the effectiveness of apology messages in a corporate crisis context. Findings indicate that one’s mental construal toward a crisis varies by crisis type, with a self-threatening crisis leading to a lower level of construal than a society-threatening one. Findings further suggest that in a society-threatening crisis condition, an informational apology was more effective than an (...)
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  170.  5
    Insubordination: Validation of a Measure and an Examination of Insubordinate Responses to Unethical Supervisory Treatment.Jeremy D. Mackey, Charn P. McAllister & Katherine C. Alexander - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (4):755-775.
    Research that examines unethical interpersonal treatment has received a great deal of attention from scholars and practitioners in recent years due to the remarkable impact of mistreatment in the workplace. However, the literature is incomplete because we have an inadequate understanding of insubordination, which we define as “subordinates’ disobedient behaviors that intentionally exhibit a defiant refusal of their supervisors’ authority.” In our study, we integrate social exchange theory and the advantageous comparison component of moral disengagement within the integrative model of (...)
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  171.  22
    The Glass Pyramid: Informal Gender Status Hierarchy on Boards.Lívia Markóczy, Sunny Li Sun & Jigao Zhu - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (4):827-845.
    Drawing on the status characteristic theory, we investigate the effect of gender on board directors’ status ranking and find that all else being equal, female directors’ status ranking is 81.48% of one position lower than that of male directors, a discrepancy that is attributable to gender. We theorize on the mechanism that determines the ways in which the status value of gender on a board affects board interactions, and we predict how this mechanism influences firm outcomes, including excessive managerial spending, (...)
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  172.  23
    I See Me: The Role of Observer Imagery in Reducing Consumer Transgressions.Ruby Saine, Alexander J. Kull, Ali Besharat & Sajeev Varki - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (4):721-732.
    As the number of consumer transgressions continues to increase, so do their financial repercussions for companies. Though academic and managerial interest in addressing this issue is growing, research on how to dissuade consumers from committing transgressions remains scarce. Drawing on the mental imagery literature and normative moral theory, the present research examines a novel way of reducing consumers’ appraisals of their own transgressions. Whereas an actor-imagery perspective fosters a teleological, egoistic view of morality and, in turn, induces moral leniency, having (...)
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  173.  7
    Correction To: Can a Good Person Be a Good Trader? An Ethical Defense of Financial Trading.Marta Rocchi & David Thunder - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (3):675-675.
    The article Can a Good Person be a Good Trader? An Ethical Defense of Financial Trading, written by Marta Rocchi and David Thunder, was originally published Online First without Open Access. After publication in volume 159, issue 1, page 89–103 the authors decided to opt for Open Choice and to make the article an Open Access publication. Therefore, the copyright of the article has been changed to © The Authors 2017 and the article is forthwith distributed under the terms of (...)
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  174.  15
    Accounting Ethics and the Fragmentation of Value.Céline Baud, Marion Brivot & Darlene Himick - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (2):373-387.
    This study investigates how one important accounting professional authority—CPA Canada—discusses accounting ethics and exhorts its members to think about ethics-related issues. To do this, we rely on empirical evidence of the types of arguments used by CPA Canada to describe what they consider acceptable moral justifications in a variety of practical situations that accountants may encounter. We argue that the articles contained in the profession’s primary publication for all members, CPA Magazine, offer a wealth of such evidence. We analyze 237 (...)
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  175.  12
    Does an Asset Owner’s Institutional Setting Influence Its Decision to Sign the Principles for Responsible Investment?Andreas G. F. Hoepner, Arleta A. A. Majoch & Xiao Y. Zhou - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (2):389-414.
    From a simple idea to unite asset owners in their quest for responsible investment at its launch in April 2006, the United Nations supported Principles for Responsible Investment have grown in just one decade into an initiative with more than 1500 fee-paying signatories. Jointly, the PRI’s signatories hold assets worth more than $80 trillion, making it one of the more prevalent not-for-profit organizations worldwide. Furthermore, the PRI’s ambitious mission to transform the financial system at large into a more sustainable one (...)
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  176.  9
    Challenges to Professional Independence in a Relational Society: Accountants in China.Gina Xu & Steven Dellaportas - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (2):415-429.
    This study examines the tensions between the western concept of professional independence and accountants’ commitment to significant others under the care perspective of guanxi. The principle of professional independence is founded on arm’s-length transactions to avoid undue influence on professional and ethical judgement. However, in the relational society of China, social interactions based on Confucianism elicit a duty of care and concern towards significant others in important relationships. For a professional accountant, the commitment to persons with whom they have guanxi (...)
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  177.  16
    The Consumers’ Emotional Dog Learns to Persuade Its Rational Tail: Toward a Social Intuitionist Framework of Ethical Consumption.Lamberto Zollo - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (2):295-313.
    Literature on consumers’ ethical decision making is rooted in a rationalist perspective that emphasizes the role of moral reasoning. However, the view of ethical consumption as a thorough rational and conscious process fails to capture important elements of human cognition, such as emotions and intuitions. Based on moral psychology and microsociology, this paper proposes a holistic and integrated framework showing how emotive and intuitive information processing may foster ethical consumption at individual and social levels. The model builds on social intuitionism (...)
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  178.  5
    Exploring Student Perceptions of the Hidden Curriculum in Responsible Management Education.Catharina Høgdal, Andreas Rasche, Dennis Schoeneborn & Levinia Scotti - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (1):173-193.
    This exploratory study analyzes the extent of alignment between the formal and hidden curricula in responsible management education. Based on case study evidence of a school that has signed the United Nations Principles for Responsible Management Education, we found poor alignment between the school’s explicit RME claims and students’ lived experiences. While the formal curriculum signaled to students that RME was important, the school’s hidden curriculum sent a number of tacit messages that led students to question the relevance and applicability (...)
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  179.  8
    The Divine States (Brahmaviharas) in Managerial Ethical Decision-Making in Organisations in Sri Lanka: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis.Thushini S. Jayawardena-Willis, Edwina Pio & Peter McGhee - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (1):151-171.
    Ethical decision-making theories in behavioural ethics management have been developed through the social sciences, psychology, social psychology, and cognitive neurosciences. These theories are either cognitive, non-cognitive or an integration of both. Other scholars have recommended redefining what ethical means through moral philosophy and theology. Buddhism is a religion, a philosophy, a psychology, an ethical system and an art of living. The divine states in Buddhism are virtues that could be developed by anyone regardless of their religion or non-religion through Buddhist (...)
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  180.  11
    Quantitative Research on Leadership and Business Ethics: Examining the State of the Field and an Agenda for Future Research.Michael Palanski, Alexander Newman, Hannes Leroy, Celia Moore, Sean Hannah & Deanne Den Hartog - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (1):109-119.
    In this article, the co-editors of the Leadership and Ethics: Quantitative Analysis section of the journal outline some of the key issues about conducting quantitative research at the intersection of business, ethics, and leadership. They offer guidance for authors by explaining the types of papers that are often rejected and how to avoid some common pitfalls that lead to rejection. They also offer some ideas for future research by drawing upon the opinions of four noted experts in the field to (...)
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