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  1.  1
    Moral Foreign Language Effect on Responses to the Trolley Dilemma Amongst Native Speakers of Arabic.Gabriel Andrade - 2022 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 22 (3-4):338-351.
    Trolley dilemmas have been tested cross-culturally, but only recently have researchers begun to assess the effect of responding to such dilemmas in a foreign language. Previous studies have found a Moral Foreign Language Effect in trolley dilemmas, whereby subjects who respond to these dilemmas in a foreign language, tend to offer more utilitarian responses. The present study seeks to test whether the MFLE holds amongst native speakers of Arabic. Additionally, the present study seeks to test whether the use of visual (...)
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  2.  1
    Merit Is Not Meritorious Everywhere: Fairness in First and Third Party Tasks Among Kogi Children.Rafael G. Angarita & Hugo Viciana - 2022 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 22 (3-4):246-263.
    Experimental research has studied the emergence of fairness criteria such as merit and equality at increasingly younger ages. How much does the recognition and practice of these principles depend on the influence of central aspects of Western educated and industrialized societies? In an attempt to answer these questions, this article provides evidence regarding the choices of children in the Kogi indigenous community of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, a traditional society living in the mountains of Northern Colombia that practices (...)
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  3.  2
    Grains of Description in Biological and Cultural Transmission.Pierrick Bourrat & Mathieu Charbonneau - 2022 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 22 (3-4):185-202.
    The question of whether cultural transmission is faithful has attracted significant debate over the last 30 years. The degree of fidelity with which an object is transmitted depends on 1) the features chosen to be relevant, and 2) the quantity of details given about those features. Once these choices have been made, an object is described at a particular grain. In the absence of conventions between different researchers and across different fields about which grain to use, transmission fidelity cannot be (...)
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  4.  3
    “Black CNN”: Cultural Transmission of Moral Norms Through Narrative Art.Jan Horský - 2022 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 22 (3-4):264-293.
    In recent debates in moral psychology and literary Darwinism, several authors suggested that narrative art plays a significant role in the process of the social learning of moral norms, functioning as storage of locally salient moral information. However, an integrative view, which would help explain the inner workings of this morally educative function of narrative art, is still lacking. This paper provides such a unifying theoretical account by bringing together insights from moral psychology, educational sciences, cognitive/evolutionary narratology, and cultural evolution. (...)
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  5.  1
    Counterfactual Thinking Made in a Relevant Choice and Negative Consequences.Juan F. Muñoz-Olano & Glenys J. Ruiz-Zapata - 2022 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 22 (3-4):324-337.
    The counterfactual thinking cannot be only developed in early childhood, but it also could be a requirement for the causal reasoning. In this research a replica of German was made using counterfactual stories with Latin American kids between three and four years, demonstrating the possible main role counterfactual reasoning, by using computer animations. This was a different approach to the most recent made by Nyhout and Ganea. Nonetheless, the participants of the study evidenced counterfactual reasoning to the relevant choice and (...)
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  6.  3
    Cultural Conventions as Group-Makers.Marc Slors - 2022 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 22 (3-4):203-219.
    In most literature on human cultural evolution and the emergence of large-scale cooperation, the main function of cultural conventions is described as providing group-markers. This paper argues that cultural conventions serve another purpose as well that is at least as important. Large-scale cooperation is characterized by complex division of labour and by a diversity of social roles associated with cultural institutions. This requires ubiquitous ‘role-interaction coordination’ – as it will be labelled. It is argued that without cultural conventions this type (...)
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  7.  2
    Forty-Eight Classical Moral Dilemmas in Persian Language: A Validation and Cultural Adaptation Study.Sajad Sojoudi, Azra Jahanitabesh, Javad Hatami & Julia F. Christensen - 2022 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 22 (3-4):352-382.
    Moral dilemmas are a useful tool to investigate empirically, which parameters of a given situation modulate participants’ moral judgment, and in what way. In an effort to provide moral judgment data from a non-WEIRD culture, we provide the translation and validation of 48 classical moral dilemmas in Persian language. The translated dilemma set was submitted to a validation experiment with N = 82 Iranian participants. The four-factor structure of this dilemma set was confirmed; including Personal Force, Benefit Recipient, Evitability, and (...)
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  8. Human-Animal Similarity and the Imageability of Mental State Concepts for Mentalizing Animals.Esmeralda G. Urquiza-Haas & Kurt Kotrschal - 2022 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 22 (3-4):220-245.
    The attribution of mental states to other species typically follows a scala naturae pattern. However, “simple” mental states, including emotions, sensing, and feelings are attributed to a wider range of animals as compared to the so-called “higher” cognitive abilities. We propose that such attributions are based on the perceptual quality of mental representations related to MS concepts. We hypothesized that the attribution of highly imaginable MS is more dependent on the familiarity of participants with animals when compared to the attribution (...)
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  9.  1
    The Dead May Kill You.Claire White, Maya Marin & Daniel M. T. Fessler - 2022 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 22 (3-4):294-323.
    There is considerable evidence that beliefs in supernatural punishment decrease self-interested behavior and increase cooperation amongst group members. To date, research has largely focused on beliefs concerning omniscient moralistic gods in large-scale societies. While there is an abundance of ethnographic accounts documenting fear of supernatural punishment, there is a dearth of systematic cross-cultural comparative quantitative evidence as to whether belief in supernatural agents with limited powers in small-scale societies also exert these effects. Here, we examine information extracted from the Human (...)
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  10.  8
    Experimental Philosophy of Mind: Free Will and a Scientific Conception of the World.Morteza Izadifar - 2022 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 22 (1-2):41-59.
    Experimental philosophy has been engaged in many fields of philosophy and has tried to challenge philosophy from a new horizon. In this article, I have tried to examine what the role of sciences are in altering people’s intuition about free will. Could science educate people’s philosophical intuitions? If yes, should we still rely on their intuition as a rational instrument for our philosophical questions? Do science plus cultural and social differences effect on folks’ view? In this cross-cultural research, the emphasis (...)
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  11.  1
    Cultural Metaphors in Hungarian Folk Songs as Repositories of Folk Cultural Cognition.Judit Baranyiné Kóczy - 2022 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 22 (1-2):136-163.
    The paper explores the status of NATURE metaphors in Hungarian folk songs with respect to their representation and transmission of folk culture and worldview. Employing a Cultural Linguistic analysis, metaphors are observed from three perspectives: in relation to cultural schemas, generic-level conceptual metaphors, and experiential motivation. NATURE metaphors are to a large extent framed by cultural experience regarding their experiential basis, conceptual structure and relation with other cultural conceptualizations.
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  12.  3
    An Introduction to the Cognitive Science of Religion: Connecting Evolution, Brain, Cognition, and Culture, Written by Claire White. [REVIEW]Ryan Lemasters - 2022 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 22 (1-2):179-183.
  13. The Development of Theory of Mind in Saudi Children.Ruba Abdelmatloub Moawad - 2022 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 22 (1-2):164-178.
    Theory of Mind is considered a person’s ability to understand his or her own mind and the minds of others, it includes a social-cognitive skill with implications for many aspects of children’s life, such as social competence, peer acceptance and early success in school. The aims of this research were to study the development of Theory of Mind and to investigate differences in the performance of Theory of Mind tasks across age groups and by gender in Saudi children. 264 children, (...)
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  14.  2
    The Memorability of Supernatural Concepts: Some Puzzles and New Theoretical Directions.Joseph Sommer, Julien Musolino & Pernille Hemmer - 2022 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 22 (1-2):90-135.
    We evaluate the literature on the memorability of supernatural concepts, itself part of a growing body of work in the emerging cognitive science of religion. Specifically, we focus on Boyer’s Minimally Counterintuitive hypothesis according to which supernatural concepts tap a cognitively privileged memory-enhancing mechanism linked to violations of default intuitive inferences. Our assessment reveals that the literature on the MCI hypothesis is mired in empirical contradictions and methodological shortcomings which makes it difficult to assess the validity of competing theoretical models, (...)
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  15.  2
    How Shame and Guilt Influence Perspective Taking: A Comparison of Turkish and German Cultures.Sinem Söylemez, Mehmet Koyuncu, Oliver T. Wolf & Belgüzar Nilay Türkan - 2022 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 22 (1-2):20-40.
    Shame and guilt are negative social emotions that are sensitive to culture, and findings from past research have suggested that shame impairs perspective-taking cognitive ability more than guilt does. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is a lack of research that has considered culture and experimentally tested the effect of shame and guilt on perspective-taking. Taking an experimental perspective, this study aimed to examine how shame and guilt states affect perspective-taking performance in two different cultures. Data from German (...)
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  16.  6
    Modeling Emotion Contagion Within a Computational Cognitive Architecture.Ron Sun, Joseph Allen & Eric Werbin - 2022 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 22 (1-2):60-89.
    The issue of emotion contagion has been gaining attention. Humans can share emotions, for example, through gestures, through speech, or even through online text via social media. There have been computational models trying to capture emotion contagion. However, these models are limited as they tend to represent agents in a very simplified way. There exist also more complex models of agents and their emotions, but they are not yet addressing emotion contagion. We use a more psychologically realistic and better validated (...)
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  17. Buckets of Steam and Left-Handed Hammers. The Fool’s Errand as Signal of Epistemic and Coalitional Dominance.Radu Umbreș - 2022 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 22 (1-2):1-19.
    In various professional groups, experts send rookies on absurd tasks as a joke. The fool’s errand appears in factories and hospitals, in elite schools and scout camps, among soldiers, sailors, and airmen. Why are newcomers deceived and humiliated, and why are pranks relatively similar and remarkably persistent over time? I propose that the cultural success and the recurrent features of the fool’s errand are based on evolved cognitive mechanisms activated by apprenticeship as social learning and group induction. Epistemic vigilance explains (...)
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