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  1.  4
    COVID-19 in Argentine Agriculture: Global Threats, Local Contradictions and Possible Responses.Juan Manuel Villulla - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (3):595-596.
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  2.  6
    The Promise and Pitfalls of Mobile Markets: An Exploratory Survey of Mobile Food Retailers in the United States and Canada.Evan Weissman, Jonnell Robinson & William Cecio - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (3):895-906.
    In recent years innovative approaches have emerged across the United States and Canada to improve access to healthful foods. Mobile markets—traveling food retailers that specifically target food deserts—are one such strategy. Given the recent emergence of mobile markets, and their positioning as a solution to disparities in food access, research is needed to understand potentials and limitations of the model. In this article, we report on findings from a survey of mobile market operators in the United States and Canada. Results (...)
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  3.  10
    Book review: Patricia Hill Collins: Intersectionality as critical social theory: Duke University Press, Durham, NC, 2019, 360 pp., ISBN 978-1-4780-0646-6. [REVIEW]Hannah T. Whitley - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (3):925-926.
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  4.  16
    Managing for the Middle: Rancher Care Ethics Under Uncertainty on Western Great Plains Rangelands.Hailey Wilmer, María E. Fernández-Giménez, Shayan Ghajar, Peter Leigh Taylor, Caridad Souza & Justin D. Derner - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (3):699-718.
    Ranchers and pastoralists worldwide manage and depend upon resources from rangelands across Earth’s terrestrial surface. In the Great Plains of North America rangeland ecology has increasingly recognized the importance of managing rangeland vegetation heterogeneity to address conservation and production goals. This paradigm, however, has limited application for ranchers as they manage extensive beef production operations under high levels of social-ecological complexity and uncertainty. We draw on the ethics of care theoretical framework to explore how ranchers choose management actions. We used (...)
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  5.  4
    COVID-19 and Medical Professionals: Lessons for Agriculture.Steven A. Wolf - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (3):567-568.
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  6.  12
    Emerging sociotechnical imaginaries for gene edited crops for foods in the United States: implications for governance.Carmen Bain, Sonja Lindberg & Theresa Selfa - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):265-279.
    Gene editing techniques, such as CRISPR, are being heralded as powerful new tools for delivering agricultural products and foods with a variety of beneficial traits quickly, easily, and cheaply. Proponents are concerned, however, about whether the public will accept the new technology and that excessive regulatory oversight could limit the technology’s potential. In this paper, we draw on the sociotechnical imaginaries literature to examine how proponents are imagining the potential benefits and risks of gene editing technologies within agriculture. We derive (...)
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  7.  22
    “Trust us, we feed this to our kids”: women and public trust in the Canadian agri-food system.Jennifer Braun, Mary Beckie & Ken Caine - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):495-507.
    Public trust of conventionally produced food is now a pivotal issue for the Canadian food supply chain as consumers are increasingly demanding traceability, transparency and sustainability of the agri-food system. To ensure that Canadians understand what farmers do, how they do it, and why—there has been significant human and financial investment by both the agri-food industry and government over the last decade. Farmers, civil servants, and non-farming agricultural professionals alike are being encouraged to join the national conversation promoting the legitimacy (...)
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  8.  16
    Staying Under the Radar: Constraints on Labour Agency of Pineapple Plantation Workers in Costa Rica?Annelien Gansemans & Marijke D’Haese - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):397-414.
    Plantation workers have seemingly little opportunities for labour agency, defined as the worker’s ability to act and improve their conditions. In response to a call for a better understanding of the horizontal dimension shaping labour agency, this article questions what local factors determine the worker’s ability to act by analysing the institutional constraints embedded in the national context through a mixed methods approach. A combination of qualitative and quantitative data is used to understand what shapes and constrains the potential for (...)
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  9.  11
    J. L. Anderson: Capitalist pigs: pigs, pork, and power in America : West Virginia University Press, Morgantown, WV, 2019, pp. 285, ISBN 978-1-946684-73-8.Hannah Kass - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):511-512.
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  10.  5
    Do Food Donation Tax Credits for Farmers Address Food Loss/Waste and Food Insecurity? A Case Study From Ontario.Lesia Kinach, Kate Parizeau & Evan D. G. Fraser - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):383-396.
    To increase donations of nutritious food, Ontario introduced a tax credit for farmers who donate agricultural products to food banks in 2013. This research seeks to investigate the role of Ontario’s Food Donation Tax Credit for Farmers in addressing both food loss and waste and food insecurity through a case study of fresh produce rescue in Windsor-Essex, Ontario. This research also documents the challenges associated with rescuing fresh produce from farms, as well as alternatives to donating. Interviews with food banks, (...)
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  11.  4
    Exploring Migrants’ Knowledge and Skill in Seasonal Farm Work: More Than Labouring Bodies.Natascha Klocker, Olivia Dun, Lesley Head & Ananth Gopal - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):463-478.
    Migrant farmworkers dominate the horticultural workforce in many parts of the Minority World. The ‘manual’ work that they do—picking and packing fruits and vegetables, and pruning vines and trees—is widely designated unskilled. In policy, media, academic, activist and everyday discourses, hired farm work is framed as something anybody can do. We interrogate this notion with empirical evidence from the Sunraysia horticultural region of Australia. The region’s grape and almond farms depend heavily on migrant workers. By-and-large, the farmers and farmworkers we (...)
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  12.  8
    ‘Pesticides Are Our Children Now’: Cultural Change and the Technological Treadmill in the Burkina Faso Cotton Sector.Jessie K. Luna - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):449-462.
    Amidst broad debates about the “New Green Revolution” in Africa, input-intensive agriculture is on the rise in some parts of Africa. This paper examines the underlying drivers of the recent and rapid adoption of herbicides and genetically modified seeds in the Burkina Faso cotton sector. Drawing on 8 months of ethnographic fieldwork in the Houndé region, this article contends that economic and cultural dynamics—often considered separately in analyses of technology adoption—have co-produced a self-reinforcing technological treadmill. On the one hand, male (...)
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  13.  3
    Cosmopolitan Translations of Food and the Case of Alternative Eating in Manila, the Philippines.Marvin Joseph F. Montefrio - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):479-494.
    Scholars believe that cosmopolitans—individuals who are open to foreign cultures—contribute to the adoption of Euro-American conceptions of food in the Global South. However, there remains a dearth in our understanding of the links between globalization, cosmopolitanism, and the reproduction of food and food cultures more broadly. In this paper, I draw from the sociology of translation to examine the mechanisms by which cosmopolitans reproduce food across space and time, a conceptual approach I refer to as ‘cosmopolitan translations of food.’ This (...)
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  14.  6
    Superfood as spatial fix: the ascent of the almond.Emily Reisman - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):337-351.
    In the twenty-first century, a widening array of unassuming fruits, vegetables, seeds and grains have been crowned “superfoods.” While many are exotic imports marketed to Western consumers through neocolonial narratives, others are familiar domestically-grown supermarket staples spectacularly rebranded. Why has “superfood” status become so central to the American produce industry? What sort of subjectivities does a superfood cultivate among consumers? This paper charts the ascent of the almond to superfood status as the latest in a series of spatial fixes alleviating (...)
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  15.  11
    Hashtag hijacking and crowdsourcing transparency: social media affordances and the governance of farm animal protection.Olga Rodak - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):281-294.
    The post-war Western world has seen a gradual shift from government to governance, a process that also concerned the issues related to agro-food sustainability, such as food quality, environmental impact, social justice, and farm animal welfare. Scholars believe that social media are a new site that reconfigures relations between various actors involved in the governance of these problems. However, empirical research on this matter remains scarce. This paper fills this gap by examining the case of Februdairy, a Twitter hashtag campaign (...)
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  16.  17
    Tore C. Olsson: Agrarian Crossings: Reformers and the Remaking of the US and Mexican Countryside: Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 2017, 296 Pp, ISBN 978-0-691-16520-2.Kelsey Ryan-Simkins - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):509-510.
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  17.  3
    The troubled path to food sovereignty in Nepal: ambiguities in agricultural policy reform.Puspa Sharma & Carsten Daugbjerg - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):311-323.
    The food sovereignty movement arose as a challenge to neoliberal models of agriculture and food and the corporatization of agriculture, which is claimed to have undermined peasant agriculture and sustainability. However, food sovereignty is an ambiguous idea. Yet, a few countries are institutionalizing it. In this paper, we argue that food sovereignty possesses the attributes of a ‘coalition magnet’ and, thus, brings together policy actors that support agricultural reform, but have diverse and often opposing interests, in a loose coalition. This (...)
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  18.  9
    Impacts on food policy from traditional and social media framing of moral outrage and cultural stereotypes.Virginia Small & James Warn - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):295-309.
    Food policy increasingly attempts to accommodate a wider and more diverse range of stakeholder interests. However, the emerging influence of different communities and networks of actors with localized concerns and interests around how food should be produced and traded, can challenge attempts to achieving more open, sustainable and globally-integrated food chains. This article analyses how cultural factors internal to a developed country can disrupt the export of food to a developing country. A framing analysis is applied to examine how activists (...)
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  19.  7
    How wage structure and crop size negatively impact farmworker livelihoods in monocrop organic production: interviews with strawberry harvesters in California.Rachel Soper - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):325-336.
    Because organic certification standards institutionalized a product-based rather than process-based definition, certified organic produce can be grown on large-scale industrial monocrop farms. Besides toxicity of inputs, these farms operate in much the same way as conventional production. Scholars emphasize the fact that labor rights have been left out of certification criteria, and because of that, organic farms reproduce the same labor relations as conventional. Empirical studies of organic farm labor, however, rely primarily on the perspective of farmers. In this study, (...)
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  20.  8
    Renegotiating Gender Roles and Cultivation Practices in the Nepali Mid-Hills: Unpacking the Feminization of Agriculture.Kaitlyn Spangler & Maria Elisa Christie - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):415-432.
    The feminization of agriculture narrative has been reproduced in development literature as an oversimplified metric of empowerment through changes in women’s labor and managerial roles with little attention to individuals’ heterogeneous livelihoods. Grounded in feminist political ecology, we sought to critically understand how labor and managerial feminization interact with changing agricultural practices. Working with a local NGO as part of an international, donor-funded research-for-development project, we conducted semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions, and participant observation with over 100 farmers in Mid-Western (...)
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  21.  2
    Does Certification Improve Hired Labour Conditions and Wageworker Conditions at Banana Plantations?Fédes van Rijn, Ricardo Fort, Ruerd Ruben, Tinka Koster & Gonne Beekman - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):353-370.
    Certification of banana plantations is widely used as a device for protecting and improving socio-economic conditions of wageworkers, including their incomes, working conditions and—increasingly—voice [related to labour relations and workplace representation]. However, to date, evidence about the effectiveness of certification in these domains is scarce. We collected detailed field data on economic benefits for improving household income, social benefits for labour practices, and the voice of wageworkers focusing on identity and identification issues amongst wageworkers at Fairtrade certified banana plantations and (...)
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  22.  5
    Mobilising Common Biocultural Heritage for the Socioeconomic Inclusion of Small Farmers: Panarchy of Two Case Studies on Quinoa in Chile and Bolivia.Thierry Winkel, Lizbeth Núñez-Carrasco, Pablo José Cruz, Nancy Egan, Luís Sáez-Tonacca, Priscilla Cubillos-Celis, Camila Poblete-Olivera, Natalia Zavalla-Nanco, Bárbara Miño-Baes & Maria-Paz Viedma-Araya - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):433-447.
    Valorising the biocultural heritage of common goods could enable peasant farmers to achieve socially and economically inclusive sustainability. Increasingly appreciated by consumers, peasant heritage products offer small farmers promising opportunities for economic, social and territorial development. Identifying the obstacles and levers of this complex, multi-scale and multi-stakeholder objective requires an integrative framework. We applied the panarchy conceptual framework to two cases of participatory research with small quinoa producers: a local fair in Chile and quinoa export production in Bolivia. In both (...)
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  23.  4
    FASTing in the Mid-West?: A Theoretical Assessment of ‘Feminist Agrifoods Systems Theory’.Wynne Wright & Alexis Annes - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):371-382.
    In this article, we assess the generalizability of the feminist agrifood systems model developed by Sachs et al.. We ask to what extent might these findings generated from the study of Pennsylvania women farmers be generalized to other regions of the U.S. We define and situate the FAST theory to the Michigan, U.S. context in order to better understand how the shifts in agriculture and women’s roles in the U.S. based on our data, align or depart with that experienced by (...)
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  24.  16
    What is technology adoption? Exploring the agricultural research value chain for smallholder farmers in Lao PDR.Kim S. Alexander, Garry Greenhalgh, Magnus Moglia, Manithaythip Thephavanh, Phonevilay Sinavong, Silva Larson, Tom Jovanovic & Peter Case - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):17-32.
    A common and driving assumption in agricultural research is that the introduction of research trials, new practices and innovative technologies will result in technology adoption, and will subsequently generate benefits for farmers and other stakeholders. In Lao PDR, the potential benefits of introduced technologies have not been fully realised by beneficiaries. We report on an analysis of a survey of 735 smallholder farmers in Southern Lao PDR who were questioned about factors that influenced their decisions to adopt new technologies. In (...)
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  25.  6
    Women Farmers in Developed Countries: A Literature Review.Jennifer A. Ball - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):147-160.
    Very little research into women farmers in developed countries has been produced by economists, but much of what has been studied by scholars in other disciplines has economic implications. This article reviews such research produced by scholars in all disciplines to explore to what extent women farmers are becoming more equal to men farmers and to suggest further contributions to the literature. As examples, topics that has been widely researched in developing countries but have received almost no attention in developed (...)
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  26.  15
    “Going Local”: Farmers’ Perspectives on Local Food Systems in Rural Canada.Naomi Beingessner & Amber J. Fletcher - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):129-145.
    Amid the highly industrialized, export-focused food system of the Canadian prairies, some farmers and consumers are turning to localized agriculture as an alternative—they are “going local”. Despite farmers’ obvious importance to the food system, surprisingly little research has examined their motivations and reasons for localization. To date, most local food scholarship in North America has focused on either consumers’ motivations to buy local or the systemic aspects of local food, such as regulations, infrastructure, and marketing arrangements. Existing research suggests that (...)
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  27.  14
    Density of resident farmers and rural inhabitants’ relationship to agriculture: operationalizing complex social interactions with a structural equation model.Ramona Bunkus, Ilkhom Soliev & Insa Theesfeld - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):47-63.
    The presence of agriculture is diminishing in today’s society: it provides only a small percentage of jobs, and the number of visible farms that can provide exposure to agricultural processes is continuously decreasing. We hypothesize that the direct involvement with farm activities or interaction with farmers and visual appreciation of agricultural processes of all kinds, influences rural inhabitants’ relationship to agriculture. We assume that the latter plays a role in how far inhabitants are attached to their place, and more specifically, (...)
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  28.  9
    Mark Schapiro: Seeds of resistance—the fight to save our food supply: Hot Books, Skyhorse Publishing, New York, 2018, 192 pp, ISBN 9781510705760.Tom Burggraf - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):251-252.
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  29.  9
    Malign and Benign Neglect: A Local Food System and the Myth of Sustainable Redevelopment in Appalachia Ohio.Angela M. Chapman & Harold A. Perkins - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):113-127.
    Local food systems seem virtuous in the larger context of the neoliberalization of global food systems and increasing food insecurity. However, local food systems are critiqued for reproducing neoliberalism when they prioritize niche-market consumerism over enhancing access for poor people. Advocates, in contrast, insist local food systems contribute to an equitable political economy of food if they are place-based and inclusive. Local food systems must not, according to them, be condemned monolithically in light of their neoliberal tendencies, but evaluated instead (...)
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  30.  15
    Maria J. Veri and Rita Liberti: Gridiron gourmet: gender and food at the football tailgate: University of Arkansas Press, Fayetteville, Arkansas, 2019, 200 pp, ISBN 978-1-68226-101-9.Carol J. Pierce Colfer - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):259-260.
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  31.  13
    Plastic scraps: biodegradable mulch films and the aesthetics of ‘good farming’ in US specialty crop production.Katherine Dentzman & Jessica R. Goldberger - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):83-96.
    Agriculture is a serious contributor to pollution and other environmental harms, making it an important site of action for the development of environmentally friendly products and practices. However, farmer adoption of such options is varied and dependent on a wide range of factors including the visual appeal of sustainable farming. Recent studies have shown that negative aesthetics related to more environmentally friendly ways of farming can delay or prevent adoption of such practices. Drawing on the concepts of good farming, cultural (...)
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  32.  4
    Responding to the Problem of ‘Food Security’ in Animal Cruelty Policy Debates: Building Alliances Between Animal-Centred and Human-Centred Work on Food System Issues.Brodie Evans & Hope Johnson - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):161-174.
    Research on ethical issues within food systems is often human-centric. As a consequence, animal-centric policy debates where regulatory decisions about food are being made tend to be overlooked by food scholars and activists. This absence was notable in the recent debates around Australia’s animal live export industry. Using Foucault’s tools, we explore how ‘food security’ is conceptualised and governed within animal cruelty policy debates about the live export trade. The problem of food security produced in these debates shaped Indonesians as (...)
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  33.  17
    Peter Dauvergne: Will big business destroy the planet?: Polity, Cambridge, UK, 2018, 139 pp, ISBN 978-1-5095-2401-3.Ritwick Ghosh - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):255-256.
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  34.  6
    Correction To: Migrant Farmworker Injury: Temporality, Statistical Representation, Eventfulness.Seth M. Holmes - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):249-249.
    The original version of this article was revised due to missing institute information in the “Context: methods and positionality” section. Where it says “there is IRB approval from X University”, it should specify “there is IRB approval from the University of California Berkeley”.
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  35.  13
    Migrant Farmworker Injury: Temporality, Statistical Representation, Eventfulness.Seth M. Holmes - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):237-247.
    This article considers ethnographic field research in order to analyze the violence and exploitation inherent to our transnational agro-food system and the ways in which temporality and statistics may aid in making visible and invisible certain experiences of migrant farmworker injury as well as individual and collective actions for wellbeing. Based in long-term, in-depth ethnographic research, this article utilizes theories of temporality and events in order to highlight social and health inequalities in agricultural labor and encourage agricultural, food and health (...)
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  36.  16
    Moral Conflicts, Premises and the Social Dimension of Agricultural Sustainability.Judith Janker - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):97-111.
    The most cited sustainability definition, by the World Commission on the Environment and Development, contains a moral imperative, as pointed out by several scholars. While ethical implications have been examined by philosophers and social scientists, concepts such as agricultural sustainability have been challenged less. The present work should contribute to the debate on the implicit moral values of agricultural sustainability and help uncover conflicting moral perspectives regarding agricultural sustainability. Choosing the social dimension of agricultural sustainability as starting point, the idea (...)
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  37.  6
    Governance for global stewardship: can private certification move beyond commodification in fostering sustainability transformations?Agni Kalfagianni, Lena Partzsch & Miriam Beulting - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):65-81.
    Stewardship—the caring for fellow human beings as well as the nonhuman world—is receiving increasing attention from scholars in the field of global environmental change. Recent publications underscore that stewardship is becoming a key norm within the global international system of states, but that in remaining state-centric, stewardship fails to create a deeper systemic transformation of the international system’s normative structure. In this article, we examine whether stewardship also underpins hybrid governance arrangements, which are a combination of public requirements and private (...)
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  38.  16
    Gluten Aversion is Not Limited to the Political Left.Trey Malone & F. Bailey Norwood - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):1-15.
    Despite a heightened political discourse surrounding food choices, few studies have identified connections between political beliefs and consumer perceptions. Using gluten as an example, this article identifies how political opinions relate to opinions of food products. If an avoidance of gluten is a biological condition and not a social construct, there should be no correlation between political opinions and gluten avoidance. Our study uncovers a complex relationship between the social construction of gluten avoidance and the potential role of political views. (...)
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  39.  9
    Using chiles and comics to address the physical and emotional wellbeing of farmworkers in Vermont’s borderlands.Teresa Mares, Naomi Wolcott-MacCausland, Julia Doucet, Andy Kolovos & Marek Bennett - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):197-208.
    In Vermont, approximately 1000–1200 migrant workers from Latin America are helping to sustain the state’s dairy industry. These dairy workers, the majority of whom are from Mexico and Guatemala, experience significant mental health impacts stemming from a combination of stressors due to leaving their home of origin and challenges related to working in rural Vermont. This article employs a framework of structural violence and structural vulnerability to situate the lived experiences and health concerns of migrant farmworkers in Vermont’s dairy industry. (...)
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  40.  15
    Steffanie Scott, Zhenzhong Si, Theresa Schumilas, Aijuan Chen : Organic food and farming in China: top-down and bottom-up ecological initiatives: Routledge, New York, NY, 2018, 223 pp, ISBN: 9781138573000.Leigh Martindale - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):253-254.
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  41.  9
    Food provisioning strategies among Latinx farm workers in southwestern Idaho.Lisa Meierotto & Rebecca Som Castellano - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):209-223.
    Food provisioning refers to the mental, physical and emotional labor involved in providing food for oneself and one’s family. The labor of food provisioning has been found to be made more difficult by a number of factors, including gender, socioeconomic status, age, and geography. However, little research has been done examining the labor of food provisioning among farm workers, a significantly marginalized population in the United States. In order to examine the food provisioning strategies and struggles of farm workers, we (...)
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  42.  9
    Introduction to the Symposium: Bienestar —the Well-Being of Latinx Farmworkers in a Time of Change.Lisa Meierotto, Teresa Mares & Seth M. Holmes - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):187-196.
    This symposium explores the well-being of Latinx farmworkers living and laboring in the United States. Our primary aim is to take a deeper look at the lived experiences of farmworkers. In the introduction, we explore the various ways in which well-being is framed in diverse academic disciplines, and how the concept of well-being has been employed in previous research on Latinx farmworkers. We argue that ethnographic methods have potential to represent farmworker experiences in a more nuanced manner than many other (...)
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  43.  10
    Erin McKenna: Livestock: food, fiber, and friends: University of Georgia Press, Athens, 2018, 251 pp, ISBN 9780820351919.Sarah Berger Richardson - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):257-258.
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  44.  11
    “Modern” Farming and the Transformation of Livelihoods in Rural Tanzania.Katherine A. Snyder, Emmanuel Sulle, Deodatus A. Massay, Anselmi Petro, Paschal Qamara & Dan Brockington - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):33-46.
    This paper focuses on smallholder agriculture and livelihoods in north-central Tanzania. It traces changes in agricultural production and asset ownership in one community over a 28 year period. Over this period, national development policies and agriculture programs have moved from socialism to neo-liberal approaches. Using a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods, we explore how farmers have responded to these shifts in the wider political-economic context and how these responses have shaped their livelihoods and ideas about farming and wealth. This (...)
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  45.  14
    Health by Mail: Mail Order Medication Practices of Latinx Dairy Worker Households on the Northern US Border.Naomi Wolcott-MacCausland, Teresa Mares & Daniel Baker - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):225-236.
    Latinx migrant farmworkers face numerous barriers in accessing health care which are linked in part to self-medication practices using health products manufactured and sold abroad. This study explores the use of mail-ordered medication among the understudied population of Latinx migrant dairy workers in Vermont, a northeastern international border state. Thirty-four Latinx migrant dairy workers or their domestic partners were interviewed. Data analysis found that myriad health access barriers compounded by increased fear of law enforcement as a result of international border (...)
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  46.  5
    Constructing Freshness: The Vitality of Wet Markets in Urban China.Shuru Zhong, Mike Crang & Guojun Zeng - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):175-185.
    Wet markets, a ‘traditional’ form of food retail, have maintained their popularity in urban China despite the rapid expansion of ‘modern’ supermarket chains. Their continued popularity rests in the freshness of their food. Chinese consumers regard freshness as the most important aspect of food they buy, but what constitutes ‘freshness’ in produce is not simply a given. Freshness is actively produced by a range of actors including wholesalers, vendors as well as consumers. The paper examines what fresh food means to (...)
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