Year:

  1.  6
    AFHVS 2020 Presidential Address: Pushing Beyond the Boundaries.Molly D. Anderson - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):607-610.
    In this 2020 AFHVS Presidential Address, Molly Anderson suggests that we must push beyond the boundaries imposed by our training, institutional reward systems, political system and comfort zones in order to solve global challenges. She lists five challenges facing those who are trying to build more sustainable food systems: overcoming the technocratic and productivist approach of industrial agriculture, avoiding future pandemics, restoring degraded and depleted systems and resources, remaining united as a movement while creating collaborations with other movements, and redistributing (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  3
    Pushing Beyond Boundaries as a Pre-Tenure Rural Sociologist Who is Not From Around Here.Florence A. Becot - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):615-619.
    In her 2020 Agriculture, Food and Human Values Society presidential address, Molly Anderson outlined three ways to push beyond boundaries imposed on us and by us to work towards addressing global food system and societal problems. In this response essay, I draw on my experiences and my perspectives as a pre-tenure rural sociologist who is not from around here to highlight how I attempt to push beyond boundaries in my own work and to discuss challenges associated with the feasibility of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  5
    Juan Francisco Salazar, Céline Granjou, Matthew Kearnes, Anna Krzywoszynska, Manuel Tironi (eds): Thinking with Soils: Material Politics and Social Theory.Rob Booth - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):855-856.
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Juan Francisco Salazar, Céline Granjou, Matthew Kearnes, Anna Krzywoszynska, Manuel Tironi (Eds): Thinking with Soils: Material Politics and Social Theory: Bloomsbury, London, UK & New York, USA, 2020, 240 Pp, ISBN 9781350109575. [REVIEW]Rob Booth - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):855-856.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  4
    Critical Environmental Justice and the Nature of the Firm.Ian Carrillo & David Pellow - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):815-826.
    The critical environmental justice framework contends that inequalities are sustained through intersecting social categories, multi-scalarity, the perceived expendability of marginalized populations, and state-vested power. While this approach offers new pathways for environmental justice research, it overlooks the role of firms, suggesting a departure from long-standing political-economic theories, such as the treadmill of production, which elevate the importance of producers. In focusing on firms, we ask: how do firms operationalize diverse social forces to produce environmental injustice? What organizational logics sustain these (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  5
    Feeding Relations: Applying Luhmann’s Operational Theory to the Food System.Amy Guptill & Emelie Peine - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):741-752.
    Current, prevalent models of the food system, including complex-adaptive systems theories and commodity-as-relation thinking, have usefully analyzed the food system in terms of its elements and relationships, confronting persistent questions about a system’s identity and leverage points for change. Here, inspired by Heldke’s analysis, we argue for another approach to the “system-ness” of food that carries those key questions forward. Drawing on Niklas Luhmann’s systems theory, we propose a model of the food system defined by the relational process of feeding (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  2
    Lydia Zepeda: Bad choices in our food system.Harvey S. James - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):853-854.
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  1
    Lydia Zepeda: Bad Choices in Our Food System: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK, 2021, 237 Pp., ISBN 978-1-5275-6466-5. [REVIEW]Harvey S. James - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):853-854.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  14
    Is there a convincing case for climate veganism?Teea Kortetmäki & Markku Oksanen - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):729-740.
    Climate change compels us to rethink the ethics of our dietary choices and has become an interesting issue for ethicists concerned about diets, including animal ethicists. The defenders of veganism have found that climate change provides a new reason to support their cause because many animal-based foods have high greenhouse gas emissions. The new style of argumentation, the ‘climatic argument for veganism’, may benefit animals by persuading even those who are not concerned about animals themselves but worry about climate change. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  9
    Scholars as allies in the struggle for food systems transformation.Charles Z. Levkoe - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):611-614.
    Molly Anderson’s 2020 Presidential Address for the Agriculture and Human Values Society, is a bold call to action that considers the scope and depth of the challenges facing global food systems. This call has particular relevance to scholars who are closely aligned with struggles for food justice and food sovereignty. In this discussion piece, I suggest additional nuance that builds and expands on Anderson’s three opportunities for “pushing beyond the boundaries”. First, collaborations for social and ecological change must be willing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  5
    The Farmer’s Battlefield: Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Unexploded Bombs in Cambodia.Erin Lin, Christine D. Sprunger & Jyhjong Hwang - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):827-837.
    What role does traditional ecological knowledge play in the lives of smallholder farmers in post-conflict communities as they cope with the destructive impacts of war? In many cases, military weapons, such as unexploded bombs, are left behind in the surrounding landscape, forcing farmers to adapt their livelihood practices to the increased risk of death and injury. We analyze trends in the local production of knowledge in Ratanak Kiri province, Cambodia, an area heavily bombarded by the US Air Force during the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  7
    Promises of Meat and Milk Alternatives: An Integrative Literature Review on Emergent Research Themes. [REVIEW]Annika Lonkila & Minna Kaljonen - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):625-639.
    Increasing concerns for climate change call for radical changes in food systems. There is a need to pay more attention to the entangled changes in technological development, food production, as well as consumption and consumer demand. Consumer and market interest in alternative meat and milk products—such as plant based milk, plant protein products and cultured meat and milk—is increasing. At the same time, statistics do not show a decrease in meat consumption. Yet alternatives have been suggested to have great transitional (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  9
    Disrupted gender roles in Australian agriculture: first generation female farmers’ construction of farming identity.Lucie Newsome - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):803-814.
    This article examines the experiences of female farmers in the Australian context who neither married into nor were born into farming and how they construct their farmer identity. Drawing on interviews with seventeen first generation female farmers it demonstrates a detraditionalized farmer identity created in response to concern for environmental and social sustainability. They are enabled by an online, global community of practice and shifting narratives of what constitutes responsible farming. Participants leveraged their skills from previous occupations to their farming (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  2
    Boundary Politics and the Social Imaginary for Sustainable Food Systems.Kim L. Niewolny - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):621-624.
    In this essay, Kim Niewolny, current President of AFHVS, responds to the 2020 AFHVS Presidential Address given by Molly Anderson. Niewolny is encouraged by Anderson’s message of moving “beyond the boundaries” by focusing our gaze on the insurmountable un-sustainability of the globalized food system. Anderson recommends three ways forward to address current challenges. Niewolny argues that building solidarity with social justice movements and engendering anti-racist praxis take precedence. This work includes but is not limited to dismantling the predominance of neoliberal-fueled (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  2
    Correction To: A Small Iowa Farmer's Perspective on COVID-19.Denise O’Brien - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):851-851.
    The article A small Iowa farmer's perspective on COVID-19, written by Denise O’Brien, was originally published electronically on the publisher’s internet portal on 14 May 2020 with open access. With the author’ decision to step back from Open Choice, the copyright of the article changed December/2020 to © Springer Nature B.V. 2020 and the article is forthwith distributed under the terms of copyright.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  2
    Stuart McCook: Coffee is not forever: a global history of the coffee leaf rust.Sabine Parrish - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):857-858.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Stuart McCook: Coffee is Not Forever: A Global History of the Coffee Leaf Rust: Ohio University Press, Athens, OH, 2019, 306 Pp, ISBN 9780821423875. [REVIEW]Sabine Parrish - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):857-858.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  8
    Josh Tickell: Kiss the ground: How the food you eat can reverse climate change, heal your body and ultimately save our world.Shannon F. Paulson - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):859-860.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  1
    Josh Tickell: Kiss the Ground: How the Food You Eat Can Reverse Climate Change, Heal Your Body and Ultimately Save Our World: Atria/Enliven Books, New York, NY, USA 2020, 334 Pp, ISBN 978-1-5011-7026-3. [REVIEW]Shannon F. Paulson - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):859-860.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  5
    Digitalization and the third food regime.Louisa Prause, Sarah Hackfort & Margit Lindgren - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):641-655.
    This article asks how the application of digital technologies is changing the organization of the agri-food system in the context of the third food regime. The academic debate on digitalization and food largely focuses on the input and farm level. Yet, based on the analysis of 280 digital services and products, we show that digital technologies are now being used along the entire food commodity chain. We argue that digital technologies in the third food regime serve on the one hand (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  2
    A Farm Systems Approach to the Adoption of Sustainable Nitrogen Management Practices in California.Jessica Rudnick, Mark Lubell, Sat Darshan S. Khalsa, Stephanie Tatge, Liza Wood, Molly Sears & Patrick H. Brown - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):783-801.
    Improving nitrogen fertilizer management in agricultural systems is critical to meeting environmental goals while maintaining economically viable and productive food systems. This paper applies a farm systems framework to analyze how adoption of N management practices is related to different farming operation characteristics and the extent to which fertilizer, soil and irrigation practices are related to each other. We develop a multivariate probit regression model to analyze the interdependency of these adoption behaviors from 966 farmers across three watersheds and diverse (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  1
    Framing of Sustainable Agricultural Practices by the Farming Press and its Effect on Adoption.Niki A. Rust, Rebecca M. Jarvis, Mark S. Reed & Julia Cooper - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):753-765.
    There is growing political pressure for farmers to use more sustainable agricultural practices to protect people and the planet. The farming press could encourage farmers to adopt sustainable practices through its ability to manipulate discourse and spread awareness by changing the salience of issues or framing topics in specific ways. We sought to understand how the UK farming press framed sustainable agricultural practices and how the salience of these practices changed over time. We combined a media content analysis of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  1
    The Intersection of Food Justice and Religious Values in Secular Spaces: Insights From a Nonprofit Urban Farm in Columbus, Ohio.Kelsey Ryan-Simkins - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):767-781.
    Critical food scholars have argued that activists’ political ideologies and environmental values are important influences on their food justice projects. However, this body of work has given little attention to religion and spirituality even though religious studies scholars maintain that religious values affect environmental and social action. Bringing together these perspectives considers the way religious values and meaning making intersect with actions toward food justice outside of traditionally religious spaces. This paper draws on qualitative research, including a dozen interviews and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  3
    Exploring the mechanisms behind farmers’ perceptions of nutrient loss risk.Elizabeth R. Schwab, Robyn S. Wilson & Margaret M. Kalcic - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):839-850.
    Harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie’s western basin are caused in large part by nutrient loss from agricultural production. While use of nutrient management practices is encouraged to reduce agricultural nutrient loss and its consequent environmental impacts, such practices are not universally adopted. This study aims to better understand the factors that influence western Lake Erie basin farmers’ risk perceptions associated with agricultural nutrient loss, and thus further our knowledge of how adoption of nutrient management practices may be increased. We (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  6
    Innovation and the Commons: Lessons From the Governance of Genetic Resources in Potato Breeding.Koen Beumer, Dirk Stemerding & Jac A. A. Swart - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):525-539.
    This article explores the relation between innovation and resources that are governed as commons by looking at the governance of potato genetic resources, especially in the context of the emergence of hybrid diploid potato breeding that will enable potato propagation through true seeds. As a new breeding tool, hybrid diploid potato breeding may not only revolutionize traditional potato breeding practices, it may also strongly affect current governance modes of potato genetic resources as a commons. Contrary to conventional accounts of the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  7
    Southern sustainability initiatives in agricultural value chains: a question of enhanced inclusiveness? The case of Trustea in India.Verena Bitzer & Alessia Marazzi - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):381-395.
    Recent studies have shed light on the emergence of Southern sustainability initiatives in commodity-based value chains. These initiatives position themselves as countering the exclusionary nature of many global multi-stakeholder initiatives, as critically analysed by previous studies. However, a common theoretical perspective on the inclusiveness of MSIs is still lacking. By drawing on the theory of regimes of engagement, we develop a theoretical framework which helps understanding the overt and subtle practices of including or excluding different stakeholders in MSIs. We apply (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  10
    Soil Balancing Within Organic Farming: Negotiating Meanings and Boundaries in an Alternative Agricultural Community of Practice.Caroline Brock, Douglas Jackson-Smith, Steven Culman, Douglas Doohan & Catherine Herms - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):449-465.
    Soil balancing is widely used in organic farming, but little is known about the practice because technical knowledge and goals for the practice are produced and negotiated within an alternative community of practice. We used a review of the private soil balancing literature and semi-structured interviews with farmers and consultants to document the knowledge, shared meanings, and goals of key actors within the soil balancing CoP. Our findings suggest this CoP is dominated by discourse between private consultants and farmers, with (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  4
    Craig B. Upright: Grocery Activism: The Radical History of Food Cooperatives in Minnesota.Joshua K. Chaney - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):595-596.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  2
    Craig B. Upright: Grocery Activism: The Radical History of Food Cooperatives in Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2020, 264 Pp, ISBN 978-1-5179-0073-1. [REVIEW]Joshua K. Chaney - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):595-596.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  5
    How water quality improvement efforts influence urban–agricultural relationships. [REVIEW]Sarah P. Church, Kristin M. Floress, Jessica D. Ulrich-Schad, Chloe B. Wardropper, Pranay Ranjan, Weston M. Eaton, Stephen Gasteyer & Adena Rissman - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):481-498.
    Urban and agricultural communities are interdependent but often differ on approaches for improving water quality impaired by nutrient runoff waterbodies worldwide. Current water quality governance involves an overlapping array of policy tools implemented by governments, civil society organizations, and corporate supply chains. The choice of regulatory and voluntary tools is likely to influence many dimensions of the relationship between urban and agricultural actors. These relationships then influence future conditions for collective decision-making since many actors participate for multiple years in water (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  5
    Using Smartphone App Collected Data to Explore the Link Between Mechanization and Intra-Household Allocation of Time in Zambia.Thomas Daum, Filippo Capezzone & Regina Birner - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):411-429.
    Digital tools may help to study socioeconomic aspects of agricultural development that are difficult to measure such as the effects of new policies and technologies on the intra-household allocation of time. As farm technologies target different crops and tasks, they can affect the time-use of men, women, boys, and girls differently. Development strategies that overlook such effects can have negative consequences for vulnerable household members. In this paper, the time-use patterns associated with different levels of agricultural mechanization during land preparation (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  3
    Overcoming the Social Stigma of Consuming Food Waste by Dining at the Open Table.Ferne Edwards - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):397-409.
    Stigma is often encountered by recipients who receive food donations from charities, while the consumption of wasted food, also traditionally considered to be a stigmatized practice, has recently become part of a popular food rescue movement that seeks to reduce environmental impacts. These two stigmas—charitable donation and the consumption of waste—are brought together at the Open Table, a community group in Melbourne, Australia, that serves community meals cooked from surplus food. This paper examines how Open Table de-stigmatizes food donations through (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  5
    Enhancing Farmers’ Agency in the Global Crop Commons Through Use of Biocultural Community Protocols.Michael Halewood, Ana Bedmar Villanueva, Jazzy Rasolojaona, Michelle Andriamahazo, Naritiana Rakotoniaina, Bienvenu Bossou, Toussaint Mikpon, Raymond Vodouhe, Lena Fey, Andreas Drews, P. Lava Kumar, Bernadette Rasoanirina, Thérèse Rasoazafindrabe, Marcellin Aigbe, Blaise Agbahounzo, Gloria Otieno, Kathryn Garforth, Tobias Kiene & Kent Nnadozie - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):579-594.
    Crop genetic resources constitute a ‘new’ global commons, characterized by multiple layers of activities of farmers, genebanks, public and private research and development organizations, and regulatory agencies operating from local to global levels. This paper presents sui generis biocultural community protocols that were developed by four communities in Benin and Madagascar to improve their ability to contribute to, and benefit from, the crop commons. The communities were motivated in part by the fact that their national governments’ had recently ratified the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  7
    Carolyn Steel: Sitopia: how food can save the world.Andrew Heffernan - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):597-598.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  2
    Carolyn Steel: Sitopia: How Food Can Save the World: Chatto & Windus, London, UK, 2020, 373 Pp, ISBN 9780701188719. [REVIEW]Andrew Heffernan - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):597-598.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  7
    Regulating surplus: charity and the legal geographies of food waste enclosure.Joshua D. Lohnes - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):351-363.
    Food charity in the United States has grown into a critical appendage of agro-food supply chains. In 2016, 4.5 billion pounds of food waste was diverted through a network of 200 regional food banks, a fivefold increase in just 20 years. Recent global trade disruptions and the COVID-19 pandemic have further reinforced this trend. Economic geographers studying charitable food networks argue that its infrastructure and moral substructure serve to revalue food waste and surplus labor in the capitalist food system. The (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  9
    ‘I Will Know It When I Taste It’: Trust, Food Materialities and Social Media in Chinese Alternative Food Networks.Leigh Martindale - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):365-380.
    Trust is often an assumed outcome of participation in Alternative Food Networks as they directly connect producers with consumers. It is based on this potential for trust “between producers and consumers” that AFNs have emerged as a significant field of food studies analysis as it also suggests a capacity for AFNs to foster associated embedded qualities, like ‘morality’, ‘social justice’, ‘ecology’ and ‘equity’. These positive benefits of AFNs, however, cannot be taken for granted as trust is not necessarily an outcome (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  4
    Chickens, weeds, and the production of green middle-class identity through urban agriculture in deindustrial Michigan, USA.Megan Maurer - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):467-479.
    In recent decades, urban agriculture has drawn practitioners seeking ways to increase both environmental sustainability and social equity in their cities. The practice has also drawn criticism for the ways it reproduces inequalities based on differences of class and race. In this paper, I argue contestations around urban agriculture are part of ongoing yet shifting processes of class formation intersecting with racial differentiation, in particular the emergence of green middle-class identity. Drawing on fourteen months of ethnographic fieldwork in a small (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  6
    Commoning the Seeds: Alternative Models of Collective Action and Open Innovation Within French Peasant Seed Groups for Recreating Local Knowledge Commons.Armelle Mazé, Aida Calabuig Domenech & Isabelle Goldringer - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):541-559.
    In this article, we expand the analytical and theoretical foundations of the study of knowledge commons in the context of more classical agrarian commons, such as seed commons. We show that it is possible to overcome a number of criticisms of earlier work by Ostrom on natural commons and its excludability/rivalry matrix in addressing the inclusive social practices of “commoning”, defined as a way of living and acting for the preservation of the commons. Our empirical analysis emphasizes, using the most (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40.  7
    Transforming a Traditional Commons-Based Seed System Through Collaborative Networks of Farmer Seed-Cooperatives and Public Breeding Programs: The Case of Sorghum in Mali.Fred Rattunde, Eva Weltzien, Mamourou Sidibé, Abdoulaye Diallo, Bocar Diallo, Kirsten vom Brocke, Baloua Nebié, Aboubacar Touré, Yalaly Traoré, Amadou Sidibé, Chiaka Diallo, Soriba Diakité, Alhousseïni Bretaudeau & Anja Christinck - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):561-578.
    Malian farmers’ traditional system for managing seed of sorghum, an indigenous crop of vital importance for food security and survival, can be conceptualized as a commons. Although this system maintains a wide range of varieties and helps ensure access to seed, its ability to create and widely disseminate new varieties to meet evolving opportunities and challenges is limited. A network of farmer groups, public breeding programs, and development organizations collaborating in decentralized creation and dissemination of sorghum varieties in Mali is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  5
    Introduction to the symposium: seed as a commons—exploring innovative concepts and practices of governing seed and varieties.Stefanie Sievers-Glotzbach & Anja Christinck - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):499-507.
    This Symposium explores how the theory of commons can be used to study, conceptualize and transform governance models for seed and plant varieties to counter ongoing trends towards agrobiodiversity loss and concentration of economic and political power in farming and food systems. Contributions to the Symposium present case studies from a range of geographical and socio-cultural contexts from the Global North and South. They show how seed and varieties relate to various known commons categories, including natural resource commons, knowledge and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  4
    Beyond the Material: Knowledge Aspects in Seed Commoning.Stefanie Sievers-Glotzbach, Johannes Euler, Christine Frison, Nina Gmeiner, Lea Kliem, Armelle Mazé & Julia Tschersich - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):509-524.
    Core sustainability issues concerning the governance of seeds revolve around knowledge aspects, such as intellectual property rights over genetic information or the role of traditional knowledge in plant breeding, seed production and seed use. While the importance of knowledge management for efficient and equitable seed governance has been emphasized in the scientific discourse on Seed Commons, knowledge aspects have not yet been comprehensively studied. With this paper, we aim to to analyze the governance of knowledge aspects in both global and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  3
    Leah Penniman: Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm’s Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land.Emily M. L. Southard - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):601-602.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  1
    Leah Penniman: Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm’s Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land: Chelsea Green Publishing, White River Junction, VT, USA, 2018, 368 Pp., ISBN 978-1603587617. [REVIEW]Emily M. L. Southard - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):601-602.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  6
    Camille Toulmin: Land, investment and migration: thirty-five years of village life in Mali.Ann Waters-Bayer - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):599-600.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  2
    Camille Toulmin: Land, Investment and Migration: Thirty-Five Years of Village Life in Mali: Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 2020, 257 Pp, ISBN 978-0-19-885276-6. [REVIEW]Ann Waters-Bayer - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):599-600.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  3
    Preserving Cultural Heritage Through the Valorization of Cordillera Heirloom Rice in the Philippines.Subir Bairagi, Marie Claire Custodio, Alvaro Durand-Morat & Matty Demont - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):257-270.
    For centuries, heirloom rice varieties have been grown on the terraces of the Cordillera Mountains of Luzon, Philippines, terroirs known for their significant historical, cultural, and aesthetic values. However, heritage heirloom rice farming is gradually being abandoned, mainly because of its lower productivity and the struggle of the sector to create a sustainable niche market for heirloom rice by branding its cultural, social, and nutritional values. We propose several demand-side intervention strategies for the valorization of heirloom rice. To support the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  5
    How the Collaborative Work of Farm to School Can Disrupt Neoliberalism in Public Schools.Andrea Bisceglia, Jennifer Hauver, David Berle & Jennifer Jo Thompson - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):59-71.
    Farm to school is a popular approach to food systems education in K-12 schools across the United States. FTS programs are highly heterogeneous, but generally include serving locally grown fruits and vegetables in school nutrition programs, planting and maintaining school gardens, and engaging students in garden and food-based learning across the school curriculum. While FTS has been promoted as a “win–win–win” for children, farmers, and communities, it has also been critiqued for reinscribing neoliberal trends that exacerbate social inequalities. Through a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  6
    The Power to Convene: Making Sense of the Power of Food Movement Organizations in Governance Processes in the Global North.Jill K. Clark, Kristen Lowitt, Charles Z. Levkoe & Peter Andrée - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):175-191.
    Dominant food systems, based on industrial methods and corporate control, are in a state of flux. To enable the transition towards more sustainable and just food systems, food movements are claiming new roles in governance. These movements, and the initiatives they spearhead, are associated with a range of labels and use a variety of strategies to enact change. In this paper, we use the concept of relational fields to conduct a post-hoc analysis of nine cases, examining how social movement organizations (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50.  7
    How many chickens does it take to make an egg? Animal welfare and environmental benefits of replacing eggs with plant foods at the University of California, and beyond.David Arthur Cleveland, Quentin Gee, Audrey Horn, Lauren Weichert & Mickael Blancho - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):157-174.
    Our question “How many chickens does it take to make an egg?” was inspired by the successful replacement of egg-based mayonnaise with plant-based mayonnaise in general dining at the University of California, Santa Barbara, in order to increase animal welfare. Our indicator of improved animal welfare due to decreased egg consumption was the reduction in number of chickens in the stressful and unhealthy conditions of the US egg industry. To measure this we calculated the ratio of chickens to eggs and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  51.  8
    Food Justice for All?: Searching for the ‘Justice Multiple’ in UK Food Movements.Helen Coulson & Paul Milbourne - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):43-58.
    In this paper, we examine diverse political philosophical conceptualisations of justice and interrogate how these contested understandings are drawn upon in the burgeoning food justice scholarship. We suggest that three interconnected dimensions of justice—plurality, the spatial–temporal and the more-than-human—deserve further analytical attention and propose the notion of the ‘justice multiple’ to bring together a multiplicity of framings and situated practices of justice. Given the lack of critical engagement food justice has received as both a concept and social movement in the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  52.  2
    Monica M. White: Freedom Farmers: Agricultural Resistance and the Black Freedom Movement.Fiona C. Doherty - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):345-346.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  53.  5
    In vino veritas, in aqua lucrum: Farmland investment, environmental uncertainty, and groundwater access in California’s Cuyama Valley.Madeleine Fairbairn, Jim LaChance, Kathryn Teigen De Master & Loka Ashwood - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):285-299.
    This paper explores the relationship between farmland investment and environmental uncertainty. It examines how farmland investors seek to “render land investible” in spite of drought, groundwater depletion, and changing regulations. To do so, we analyze a single case study: the purchase of 8000 acres of dry rangeland in California’s Cuyama Valley by the Harvard University endowment for use in creating an irrigated vineyard. Drawing from interviews with Cuyama Valley farmers and community members, participant observation at community meetings, and public document (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  54.  6
    Locked-in or Ready for Climate Change Mitigation? Agri-Food Networks as Structures for Dairy-Beef Farming.Maja Farstad, Heidi Vinge & Egil Petter Stræte - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):29-41.
    Many countries have included agriculture as one of the sectors where they intend to obtain significant greenhouse gas emission reductions. In Norway, the dairy-beef sector, in particular, has been targeted for considerable emission cuts. Despite publicly expressed interest within the agricultural sector for reducing emissions, significant measures have yet to be implemented. In this paper, we draw on qualitative data from Norway when examining the extent the wider agri-food network around farmers promotes or restrains the transition toward low-emission agricultural production. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  55.  4
    Laura-Anne Minkoff-Zern: The New American Farmer: Immigration, Race, and the Struggle for Sustainability.Andrew Flachs - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):341-342.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  56.  9
    Food sovereignty policies and the quest to democratize food system governance in Nicaragua.Wendy Godek - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):91-105.
    This article explores the question of the efficacy of state-level food sovereignty projects for democratizing local control over food systems by examining the case of Nicaragua, where the Ortega administration adopted food sovereignty into policy. The main task of food sovereignty is to transform the power relations that govern food systems. This article builds on the previous work of food sovereignty scholars by arguing that devolving power to local territories is necessary but insufficient for deepening democracy, and rather must be (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  57.  4
    Christopher Mayes: Unsettling food politics: agriculture, dispossession and sovereignty in Australia.Eden Kinkaid - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):343-344.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  58.  1
    Unearthing the Entangled Roots of Urban Agriculture.Jonathan K. London, Bethany B. Cutts, Kirsten Schwarz, Li Schmidt & Mary L. Cadenasso - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):205-220.
    This study examines urban agriculture in Sacramento, California, the nation's self-branded “Farm-to-Fork Capital,” in order to highlight UA’s distinct yet entangled roots. The study is based on 24 interviews with a diverse array of UA leaders, conducted as part of a five-year transdisciplinary study of UA in Sacramento. In it, we unearth three primary “taproots” of UA projects, each with its own historical legacies, normative visions, and racial dynamics. In particular, we examine UA projects with “justice taproots,” “health taproots,” and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  59.  8
    Organizing for Thoughtful Food: A Meshwork Approach.Kathryn Pavlovich, Alison Henderson & David Barling - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):145-155.
    This paper provides an alternative narrative for organizing food systems. It introduces meshwork as a novel theoretical lens to examine the ontological assumptions underlying the shadow and informal dynamics of organizing food. Through a longitudinal qualitative case study, we place relationality and becoming at the centre of organizing food and food systems, demonstrating how entangled relationships can create a complex ontology through the meshwork knots, threads and weave. We show how issues of collective concern come together to form dynamic knots (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  60.  10
    Blunting EU Regulation 1107/2009: following a regulation into a system of agricultural innovation.Sophie Payne-Gifford, C. S. Srinivasan & Peter Dorward - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):221-241.
    This paper explores the role of regulation and legislation on influencing the development and diffusion of technologies and methods of crop production. To do this, the change in pesticide registration under European Regulation 1107/2009 ‘Placing Plant Protection Products on the Market’ was followed through the UK’s agricultural system of innovation. Fieldwork included: a series of interviews conducted with scientists, agronomists and industry organisations; a programme of visiting agricultural events; as well as sending an electronic survey to British potato growers. The (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  61.  5
    Correction to: Introduction to symposium ‘Reimagining land: materiality, affect and the uneven trajectories of land transformation’.Sarah Ruth Sippel & Oane Visser - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):283-283.
    Unfortunately there has been a severe mis-referencing in the published article. Therefore the article has been updated.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  62.  7
    Introduction to Symposium ‘Reimagining Land: Materiality, Affect and the Uneven Trajectories of Land Transformation’.Sarah Ruth Sippel & Oane Visser - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):271-282.
    Over the past decade land has again moved to the centre of resource conflicts, agrarian struggles, and competing visions over the future of food and farming. This renewed interest in land necessitates asking the seemingly simple, but pertinent, question ‘whatisland?’ To reach a more profound understanding of the uniqueness of land, and what distinguishes land from other resources, this symposium suggests the notion of ‘land imaginaries’ as a crucial lens in the study of current land transformations. Political-economy, and the particular (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  63.  5
    Food system perspective on fisheries and aquaculture development in Asia. [REVIEW]Xavier Tezzo, Simon R. Bush, Peter Oosterveer & Ben Belton - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):73-90.
    This paper reviews development research and policies on freshwater fish in South and Southeast Asia. We conduct a systematic review of academic literature from three major science-based policy institutions to analyze development research and policies that have accompanied the ongoing transition from freshwater capture fisheries to aquaculture in the region. Using a ‘food fish system’ framework allows for the identification and systematic comparison of assumptions underpinning dominant development policies. We analyze the interrelations between the production, provisioning, and consumption of wild (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  64.  6
    Building and Transforming Collective Agency and Collective Identity to Address Latinx Farmworkers’ Needs and Challenges in Rural Vermont.Diego Thompson - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):129-143.
    Immigrant farmworkers from Latin America experience multiple challenges in rural Vermont. A large body of literature has shown the benefits that collective agency can represent for migrant farmworkers in the U.S. food system. These initiatives have mainly focused on the improvement of human and labor conditions by empowering farmworkers. However, little is known about what factors influence the creation and progress of these types of collaborative efforts to address challenges faced by immigrant farmworkers in rural areas. By analyzing work completed (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  65.  6
    Steven McFadden: Deep agroecology: farms, food, and our future.Simona Zollet - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):339-340.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues