Agriculture and Human Values

ISSNs: 0889-048X, 1572-8336

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  1.  3
    Window dressing inequalities and constructing women farmers as problematic—gender in Rwanda’s agriculture policy.Karolin Andersson, Katarina Pettersson & Johanna Bergman Lodin - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1245-1261.
    Rwanda is often depicted as a success story by policy makers when it comes to issues of gender. In this paper, we show how the problem of gendered inequality in agriculture nevertheless is both marginalized and instrumentalized in Rwanda’s agriculture policy. Our in-depth analysis of 12 national policies is informed by Bacchi’s _What’s the problem represented to be?_ approach. It attests that gendered inequality is largely left unproblematized as well as reduced to a problem of women’s low agricultural productivity. The (...)
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  2.  2
    Correction: From Big Ag to Big Finance: a market network approach to power in agriculture.Loka Ashwood, Andy Pilny, John Canfield, Mariyam Jamila & Ryan Thomson - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1435-1435.
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  3.  3
    From Big Ag to Big Finance: a market network approach to power in agriculture.Loka Ashwood, Andy Pilny, John Canfield, Mariyam Jamila & Ryan Thomson - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1421-1434.
    AbstractCritics charge that agriculture has reached an unsustainable level of consolidation and expropriation, as exemplified by the supply-chain breakdown of the COVID-19 pandemic. Simultaneously, advocates suggest the current system serves consumers well by keeping prices low and access to choices high. At the center of this debate rests a disagreement over how to compute market power to identify monopolies and oligopolies. We propose a method to study power across different sectors by using Social Network Analysis to analyze key players, the (...)
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  4.  6
    Power to the people? Food democracy initiatives’ contributions to democratic goods. [REVIEW]Jeroen J. L. Candel - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1477-1489.
    AbstractIn order to foster a transition of the food system toward more sustainable outcomes, scholars have increasingly pointed at the need for organizing strengthened food democracy. By increasing the participation of citizens and food system actors, democratic innovations, such as food policy councils, are believed to promote the quality and legitimacy of food policymaking. However, the question of whether and how food democracy initiatives do indeed contribute to more democratic modes of governance largely remains unexplored. This study addresses this gap (...)
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  5. Transdisciplinary research for wicked problems: a transaction costs approach.David S. Conner - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1169-1172.
    This paper outlines different types of knowledge and how they are applied to different problem types. It makes the case that co-created knowledge, generated by innovative and collaborative partnerships of scholars within a transdisciplinary framework is best suited to address the most complex and therefore most important problems in food systems scholarship. It applies Transaction Costs theory to highlight some of the options we scholars face and applies these concepts to the issue of Payments for Ecosystems Services., with an analogy (...)
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  6.  2
    Academics and the ‘easy button’: lessons from pesticide resistance management.Katherine Dentzman - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1179-1183.
    The siren call of easy solutions to socio-agricultural problems is often studied as a reflection of anthropocentric ideologies espousing faith in human ingenuity to overcome, often with technological innovations, any hurdles thrown at us. This theme has been reflected especially strongly in my own research on pesticide resistance, with farmers continually referring to the necessity of an ‘easy button’ or ‘silver bullet’ (usually in the form of a new chemical herbicide) that will solve the extremely complex and multi-dimensional problem of (...)
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  7.  3
    Rethinking gender mainstreaming in agricultural innovation policy in Nepal: a critical gender analysis.Rachana Devkota, Laxmi Prasad Pant, Helen Hambly Odame, Bimala Rai Paudyal & Kelly Bronson - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1373-1390.
    Gender mainstreaming has been prioritised within the national agricultural policies of many countries, including Nepal. Yet gender mainstreaming at the national policy level does not always work to effect change when policies are implemented at the local scale. In less-developed nations such as Nepal, it is rare to find a critical analysis of the mainstreaming process and its successes or failures. This paper employs a critical gender analysis approach to examine the gender mainstreaming efforts in Nepal as they move from (...)
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  8.  5
    Social reproduction, playful work, and bee-centred beekeeping.Rebecca Ellis - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1329-1340.
    With growing awareness of a crisis in pollinator health, the practice of urban hobbyist beekeeping has grown in Canada with practitioners arguing that this activity can help to foster healthier honey bees and more mindful beekeeping practices. However, urban hobbyist beekeepers have been critiqued for encouraging improper beekeeping practices and over-saturation of honey bees in cities. Drawing on a multispecies ethnography based in London, Ontario and Toronto, including participant observation with the Toronto Beekeeping Collective and the London Urban Beekeeping Collective (...)
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  9.  4
    Governing the soil: natural farming and bionationalism in India.Ian Carlos Fitzpatrick, Naomi Millner & Franklin Ginn - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1391-1406.
    This article examines India’s response to the global soil health crisis. A longstanding centre of agricultural production and innovation, India has recently launched an ambitious soil health programme. The country’s Soil Health Card (SHC) Scheme intervenes in farm-scale decisions about efficient fertiliser use, envisioning farmers as managers and soil as a substrate for production. India is also home to one of the world’s largest alternative agriculture movements: natural farming. This puts farmer expertise at the centre of soil fertility and attends (...)
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  10.  2
    Producer organizations as transition intermediaries? Insights from organic and conventional vegetable systems in Uruguay.Annemarie Groot-Kormelinck, Jos Bijman, Jacques Trienekens & Laurens Klerkx - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1277-1300.
    Increased pressures on agri-food systems have indicated the importance of intermediaries to facilitate sustainability transitions. While producer organizations are acknowledged as intermediaries between individual producers and other food system actors, their role as sustainability transition intermediaries remains understudied. This paper explores the potential of producer organizations as transition intermediaries to support producers in their needs to adopt sustainable production practices. Ten cases of producer organizations in conventional (regime) and organic (niche) vegetable systems in Uruguay were studied qualitatively. Findings show that (...)
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  11.  5
    Pedagogies for seed sovereignty in Colombia: epistemic, territorial, and gendered dimensions.Nathalia Hernández Vidal - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1217-1229.
    AbstractIn this article, I examine the pedagogical practices of La Red de Semillas Libres de Colombia, a grassroots national organization that works towards the construction of seed sovereignty. Using participant observation and interviews, I show the epistemic, territorial, and gender dimensions of these practices. I draw from extant scholarship on seed struggles, decolonial feminism, and feminist political ecology to analyze two specific practices: experimentation and demonstration and, visual technology creation, including drawings. I demonstrate how these practices organize territories through collective (...)
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  12.  2
    Agroecology: advancing inclusive knowledge co-production with society.Lia R. Kelinsky-Jones - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1173-1178.
    David Conner’s 2022 AFHVS Presidential Address discusses the importance for transdisciplinary partnerships among varied scholars and the co-creation of new knowledge. He suggests that without such co-creation, we will fail to solve wicked problems such as food system sustainability. In this essay, Kelinsky-Jones focuses on requisite changes among universities and federal funding alike to advance food system transformation sustainability and equitably. She argues that without prioritizing transdisciplinary partnerships grounded in principles of epistemic inclusion, we will fail to envision and enact (...)
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  13.  2
    Madeleine Fairbairn: Fields of gold: financing the global land rush.Carl Lewelling - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1509-1510.
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  14.  3
    Relational values and management of plant resources in two communities in a highly biodiverse area in western Mexico.Sofía Monroy-Sais, Eduardo García-Frapolli, Alejandro Casas, Francisco Mora, Margaret Skutsch & Peter R. W. Gerritsen - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1231-1244.
    AbstractIn many cultures, interactions between humans and plants are rooted in what is called “relational values”—values that derive from relationships and entail reciprocity. In Mexico, biocultural diversity is mirrored in the knowledge and use of some 6500 plant species and the domestication of over 250 Mesoamerican native crop species. This research explores how different sets of values are attributed to plants and how these influence management strategies to maintain plant resources in wild and anthropogenic environments. We ran workshops in two (...)
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  15.  9
    Restoring sense out of disorder? Farmers’ changing social identities under big data and algorithms.Ayorinde Ogunyiola & Maaz Gardezi - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1451-1464.
    AbstractAdvances in precision agriculture, driven by big data technologies and machine learning algorithms can transform agriculture by enhancing crop and livestock productivity and supporting faster and more accurate on and off-farm decision making. However, little is known about how PA can influence farmers’ sense of self, their skills and competencies, and the meanings that farmers ascribe to farming. This study is animated by scholarly commitment to social identity research, and draws from socio-cyber-physical systems research, domestication theory, and activity theory. This (...)
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  16.  1
    Who should feed hungry families during crisis? Moral claims about hunger on Twitter during the COVID-19 pandemic.Merin Oleschuk - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1437-1449.
    How do crisis conditions affect longstanding societal narratives about hunger? This paper examines how hunger was framed in public discourse during an early period in the COVID-19 crisis to mobilize attention and make moral claims on others to alleviate it. It does so through a discourse analysis of 1023 U.S.-based English-language posts dedicated to hunger on Twitter during four months of the COVID-19 pandemic. This analysis finds that Twitter users chiefly adopted hunger as a political tool to make moral claims (...)
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  17.  4
    Exploring the influence of social and informational networks on small farmers’ responses to climate change in Oregon.Melissa Parks - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1407-1419.
    Farmers’ willingness and ability to adapt to climate change are in part influenced by their social networks and sources of information. Drawing on assemblage theory and social network analysis in a novel way, this study explores the influence of Oregonian small farmers’ social and informational networks on their beliefs about and responses to climate change. The use of assemblage theory, which focuses on many disparate elements as they co-function in a space, allows for multiple entities within farmers’ networks and the (...)
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  18.  3
    City networks’ power in global agri-food systems.Lena Partzsch, Jule Lümmen & Anne-Cathrine Löhr - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1263-1275.
    Cities and local governments loom large on the sustainability agenda. Networks such as Fair Trade Towns International (FTT) and the Organic Cities Network aim to bring about global policy change from below. Given the new enthusiasm for local approaches, it seems relevant to ask to what extent local groups exercise power and in what form. City networks present their members as “ethical places” exercising _power with_, rather than _power over_ others. The article provides an empirical analysis of the power of (...)
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  19.  1
    Women, race and place in US Agriculture.Ryanne Pilgeram, Katherine Dentzman & Paul Lewin - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1341-1355.
    Research on women in U.S. agriculture highlights how, despite real challenges, women have made and continue to make spaces for themselves in this male-dominated profession. We argue that, partly due to data accessibility limitations, this work has tended to use white women’s experiences in agriculture as universal. Analyzing micro-data from the 2017 Census of Agriculture, this paper offers descriptive statistics about women and race in U.S. agriculture. We examine numerous characteristics of U.S. farms, including their spatial distribution, the average number (...)
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  20.  5
    Restore politics in societal debates on new genomic techniques.Lonneke M. Poort, Jac A. A. Swart, Ruth Mampuys, Arend J. Waarlo, Paul C. Struik & Lucien Hanssen - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1207-1216.
    End of April 2021, the European Commission published its study on New Genomic Techniques (NGTs). The study involved a consultation of Member States and stakeholders. This study reveals a split on whether current legislation should be maintained or adapted to take account of scientific progress and the risk level of NGT products. This split was predictable. New technological developments challenge both ethical viewpoints and regulatory institutions; and contribute to the growing divide between science and society that value ‘technological innovations’ differently. (...)
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  21.  6
    Agroecology in the North: Centering Indigenous food sovereignty and land stewardship in agriculture “frontiers”.Mindy Jewell Price, Alex Latta, Andrew Spring, Jennifer Temmer, Carla Johnston, Lloyd Chicot, Jessica Jumbo & Margaret Leishman - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1191-1206.
    Warming temperatures in the circumpolar north have led to new discussions around climate-driven frontiers for agriculture. In this paper, we situate northern food systems in Canada within the corporate food regime and settler colonialism, and contend that an expansion of the conventional, industrial agriculture paradigm into the Canadian North would have significant socio-cultural and ecological consequences. We propose agroecology as an alternative framework uniquely accordant with northern contexts. In particular, we suggest that there are elements of agroecology that are already (...)
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  22.  2
    Shaila Seshia Galvin: Becoming organic—Nature and agriculture in the Indian Himalaya. [REVIEW]Rama Shankar Sahu - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1511-1512.
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  23.  1
    Negotiating agricultural change in the Midwestern US: seeking compatibility between farmer narratives of efficiency and legacy.Nathan J. Shipley, William P. Stewart & Carena J. van Riper - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1465-1476.
    AbstractAgroecosystems in the Midwestern United States are undergoing changes that pressure farmers to adapt their farming practices. Because farmers decide what practices to implement on their land, there are needs to understand how they adapt to competing demands of changes in global markets, technology, farm sizes, and decreasing rural populations. Increased understanding of farmer decision-making can also inform agricultural policy in ways that encourage farmer adoption of sustainable practices. In this research we adopt a grounded view of farmers by interpreting (...)
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  24.  1
    How digital communications contribute to shaping the career paths of youth: a review study focused on farming as a career option. [REVIEW]İlkay Unay-Gailhard & Mark A. Brennen - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1491-1508.
    Can the power of digital communications create opportunities for overcoming generational renewal problems on farms? This interdisciplinary review explores the reported impacts of digital communication on career initiation into farming from a global perspective via the lens of career theories. Seventy-three papers were synthesized into two domains: (1) the impact of digital communication interactions on farming career initiation, and (2) the dynamics of digital communication initiatives that create opportunities to inspire youth into farming. The finding shows that the mainstream literature (...)
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  25.  1
    The agri-food system (re)configuration: the case study of an agroecological network in the Ecuadorian Andes.Virginia Vallejo-Rojas, Marta G. Rivera-Ferre & Federica Ravera - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1301-1327.
    AbstractSocial Ecological System research highlights the importance of understanding the potential of collective actions, among other factors, when it comes to influencing the transformative configuration of agri-food systems in response to global change. Such a response may result in different desired outcomes for those actors who promote collective action, one such outcome being food sovereignty. In this study, we used an SES framework to describe the configuration of local agri-food systems in Andean Ecuador in order to understand which components of (...)
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  26.  4
    Revisiting the adequacy of the economic policy narrative underpinning the Green Revolution.Jacob van Etten - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1357-1372.
    AbstractThe Green Revolution still exerts an important influence on agricultural policy as a technology-centred development strategy. A main policy narrative underpinning the Green Revolution was first expounded in Transforming Traditional Agriculture, a book published in 1964 by Nobel Prize-winning economist Ted Schultz. He famously argued that traditional farmers were ‘poor but efficient’. As farmers responded to economic incentives, technology-driven strategies would transform traditional agriculture into an engine of economic growth. Schultz relied on published ethnographic data and his own calculations to (...)
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  27. Transdisciplinary research for wicked problems.Michelle R. Worosz - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1185-1189.
    Addressing “wicked” socio-ecological problems necessitate the integration of knowledge and methods from multiple disciplines. Transdisciplinarity (TD) is one such strategy; its focus is to enhance the comprehensiveness, robustness, and relevance of science via cross-disciplinary team science (CDTS). What separates TD from other forms of CDTS (e.g., multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary) is the meaningful inclusion of a diverse set of nonacademic stakeholders. In collaboration, the TD team draws on tacit and explicit knowledge to co-develop new understandings of vexing “real-world” problems. However, guidance for (...)
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  28.  5
    Genome-edited versus genetically-modified tomatoes: an experiment on people’s perceptions and acceptance of food biotechnology in the UK and Switzerland.Angela Bearth, Gulbanu Kaptan & Sabrina Heike Kessler - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):1117-1131.
    Biotechnology might contribute to solving food safety and security challenges. However, gene technology has been under public scrutiny, linked to the framing of the media and public discourse. The study aims to investigate people’s perceptions and acceptance of food biotechnology with focus on transgenic genetic modification versus genome editing. An online experiment was conducted with participants from the United Kingdom and Switzerland. The participants were presented with the topic of food biotechnology and more specifically with experimentally varied vignettes on transgenic (...)
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  29.  4
    Medical economic vulnerability: a next step in expanding the farm resilience scholarship.Florence A. Becot & Shoshanah M. Inwood - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):1097-1116.
    In recent years, the long-standing questions of why, how, and which farm families continue farming in the face of ongoing changes have increasingly been studied through the resilience lens. While this body of work is providing updated and novel insights, two limitations, a focus on macro-level challenges faced by the farm operation and a mismatch between the scale of challenges and resilience measures, likely limit our understanding of the factors at play. We use the example of medical economic vulnerability, a (...)
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  30.  4
    Community financing for sustainable food and farming: a proximity perspective.Gerlinde Behrendt, Sarah Peter, Simone Sterly & Anna Maria Häring - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):1063-1075.
    An increasing number of small and medium-sized enterprises in the German organic agri-food sector involves citizens through different community financing models. While such models provide alternative funding sources as well as marketing opportunities to SMEs, they allow private investors to combine their financial and ethical concerns by directly supporting the development of a more sustainable food system. Due to the low level of financial intermediation, community financing is characterized by close relations between investors and investees. Against this background, we apply (...)
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  31.  4
    Understanding the pathways to women’s empowerment in Northern Ghana and the relationship with small-scale irrigation.Elizabeth Bryan & Elisabeth Garner - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):905-920.
    Women’s empowerment is often an important goal of development interventions. This paper explores local perceptions of empowerment in the Upper East Region of Ghana and the pathways through which small-scale irrigation intervention targeted to men and women farmers contributes to women’s empowerment. Using qualitative data collected with 144 farmers and traders through 28 individual interviews and 16 focus group discussions, this paper innovates a framework to integrate the linkages between small-scale irrigation and three dimensions of women’s empowerment: resources, agency, and (...)
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  32.  2
    Liberation extension: building capacities for civilizational transition.Nicholas Copeland - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):859-870.
    COVID 19 has exacerbated and underscored structural inequalities and endemic vulnerabilities in food, economic, and social systems, compounding concerns about environmental sustainability and racial and economic justice. Convergent crises have amplified a growing chorus of voices and movements calling for new thinking and new practices to adapt to these shifts, mitigate their impact, and address their root causes through far reaching changes in social and economic life and values, including breaking with the free market paradigm. In the face of a (...)
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  33.  2
    Sustainability assessment of short food supply chains (SFSC): developing and testing a rapid assessment tool in one African and three European city regions.Alexandra Doernberg, Annette Piorr, Ingo Zasada, Dirk Wascher & Ulrich Schmutz - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):885-904.
    Recent literature demonstrates the contribution of short food supply chains to regional economies and sustainable food systems, and acknowledges their role as drivers for sustainable development. Moreover, different types of SFSC have been supported by urban food policies over the few last years and actors from the food chain became part of new institutional settings for urban food policies. However, evidence from the sustainability impact assessment of these SFSC in urban contexts is limited. Our paper presents an approach for the (...)
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  34.  3
    Agroecology from the ground up: a critical analysis of sustainable soil management in the highlands of Guatemala.Nathan Einbinder, Helda Morales, Mateo Mier Y. Terán Giménez Cacho, Bruce G. Ferguson, Miriam Aldasoro & Ronald Nigh - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):979-996.
    A persistent problem in the dominant agricultural development model is the imposition of technologies without regard to local processes and cultures. Even with the recent shift towards sustainability and agroecology, initiatives continue to overlook local knowledge. In this article we provide analysis of agroecological soil management in the Maya-Achi territory of Guatemala. The Achí, subject to five decades of interventions and development, present an interesting case study for assessing the complementarities and tensions between traditional, generally preventative practices and external initiatives (...)
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  35.  4
    Ben White: Agriculture and the generation problem: Practical Action Publishing, Rugby, England, 2020, 155 pp, ISBN: 9781773631677.Bernard Ekumah - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):1163-1164.
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  36.  2
    Landownership and power: reorienting land tenure theory.Ennea Fairchild & Peggy Petrzelka - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):997-1006.
    Historically, land tenure theory tends to present the relationships between agricultural landowners and their renter as either a dominant renter-subordinate landlord relationship where the renter holds the power in decision-making on the land, or a dominant landlord-subordinate renter relationship where the landlord maintains the power over decisions on the land. However, these relationships are much more complex and nuanced, as more recent studies have begun to emphasize. In our study, we contribute to this evolving re-orientation in land tenure theory by (...)
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  37.  2
    Means and ways of engaging, communicating and preserving local soil knowledge of smallholder farmers in Central Vietnam.Ha T. N. Huynh, Lisa A. Lobry de Bruyn, Oliver G. G. Knox & Hoa T. T. Hoang - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):1039-1062.
    Increasing interest in farmers’ local soil knowledge and soil management practice as a way to promote sustainable agriculture and soil conservation needs a reliable means to connect to it. This study sought to examine if Visual Soil Assessment and farmer workshops were suitable means to engage, communicate and preserve farmers’ LSK in two mountainous communes of Central Vietnam. Twenty-four farmers with reasonable or comprehensive LSK from previously studied communes were selected for the efficacy of VSA and farmer workshops for integrating (...)
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  38.  4
    Decolonizing agriculture in the United States: Centering the knowledges of women and people of color to support relational farming practices.Emma Layman & Nicole Civita - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):965-978.
    While the agricultural knowledges and practices of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color and women have shaped agriculture in the US, these knowledges have been colonized, exploited, and appropriated, cleaving space for the presently dominant white male agricultural narrative. Simultaneously, these knowledges and practices have been transformed to fit within a society that values individualism, production, efficiency, and profit. The authors use a decolonial Feminist Political Ecology framework to highlight the ways in which the knowledges of Indigenous, Black, and women (...)
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  39.  3
    Commons, global markets and small-scale family enterprises: the case of mezcal production in Oaxaca, Mexico.María G. Lira, James P. Robson & Daniel J. Klooster - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):937-952.
    Interactions with global markets offer development opportunities for Indigenous communities. They also place pressure on the natural resources that communities depend upon for their livelihood and, in many cases, their political and cultural autonomy. These markets often interact with family-based enterprises embedded within commons, with important implications for the social relationships and shared territorial resources that characterise such regimes. In this paper, we analyse the relationships that exist between commons, global markets, and small-scale family enterprises, using the case of mezcal (...)
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  40.  2
    Agroecological producers shortening food chains during Covid-19: opportunities and challenges in Costa Rica.Mary Little & Olivia Sylvester - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):1133-1140.
    The Covid-19 pandemic has compounded the global food insecurity crisis, disproportionately affecting the consumers, farmers, and food workers. The significant disruptions caused by Covid-19 have called international attention to food security and sparked conversations about how to better support food production and trade. Our paper contributes to a small but growing literature on the impacts and responses of agroecological farmers to Covid-19 in Costa Rica. Specifically, we interviewed 30 agroecological farmers about livelihood disruptions during Covid-19, the areas of food production (...)
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  41.  2
    Julie C. Keller: Milking in the shadows: migrants and mobility in America’s dairyland: Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ, USA, 2019, 196 pp, ISBN: 978-0813596419. [REVIEW]Kyle McDonald & Amanda McMillan Lequieu - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):1159-1160.
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  42.  2
    Julie C. Keller: Milking in the shadows: migrants and mobility in America’s dairyland.Amanda McMillan Lequieu & Kyle McDonald - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):1159-1160.
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  43.  3
    From marginalized to miracle: critical bioregionalism, jungle farming and the move to millets in Karnataka, India.David Meek - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):871-883.
    Historically marginalized foods, which occupy the social periphery, and often function as a bulwark in times of hunger, are increasingly being rediscovered and revalued as niche commodities. From açaí to quinoa, the move from marginal to miracle is often tied to larger narratives surrounding sustainable development, resilience to climate change, and traditional foodways. This article analyses the recent move towards millet production and consumption in the southern Indian state of Karnataka. Focusing upon one of the grain’s chief proponents, I explore (...)
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  44.  7
    L’Atelier Paysan: Reprendre la Terre aux Machines: Manifeste pour une Autonomie Paysanne et Alimentaire [taking back the land from the machines: a manifesto for peasant and food autonomy].Morgan Meyer - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):1161-1162.
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  45.  2
    L’Atelier Paysan: Reprendre la Terre aux Machines: Manifeste pour une Autonomie Paysanne et Alimentaire [taking back the land from the machines: a manifesto for peasant and food autonomy]: Le Seuil, Paris, 2021, 288 pp, ISBN ‎2021478173. [REVIEW]Morgan Meyer - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):1161-1162.
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  46.  3
    The contestations of diversity, culture and commercialization: why tissue culture technology alone cannot solve the banana Xanthomonas wilt problem in central Uganda.Lucy Mulugo, Paul Kibwika, Florence Birungi Kyazze, Aman Omondi Bonaventure & Enoch Kikulwe - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):1141-1158.
    Several initiatives by the Government of Uganda, Research Institutes and CGIAR centers have promoted the use of tissue culture banana technology as an effective means of providing clean planting material to reduce the spread of Banana Xanthomonas wilt but its uptake is still low. We examine factors that constrain uptake of tissue culture banana planting materials in central Uganda by considering the cultural context of banana cultivation. Data were collected using eight focus group discussions involving 64 banana farmers and 10 (...)
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  47.  2
    Bt cotton, pink bollworm, and the political economy of sociobiological obsolescence: insights from Telangana, India.Katharina Najork, Jonathan Friedrich & Markus Keck - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):1007-1026.
    After genetically engineered Bt cotton lost its effectiveness in central and southern Indian states, pink bollworm infestations have recently returned to farmers’ fields and have substantially shifted their vulnerability context. We conceive Bt cotton as a neoliberal technology that is built to protect farmers only temporarily from Lepidopteran pests while ultimately driving the further concentration of capital. Based on data from a representative survey of the three major cotton-producing districts of the state of Telangana, we find that pink bollworm pest (...)
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  48.  4
    The adoption problem is a matter of fit: tracing the travel of pruning practices from research to farm in Ghana’s cocoa sector.Faustina Obeng Adomaa, Sietze Vellema, Maja Slingerland & Richard Asare - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):921-935.
    Good Agricultural Practices are central to sustainability standards and certification programmes in the global cocoa chain. Pruning is one of the practices promoted in extension services associated with these sustainability efforts. Yet concerns exist about the low adoption rate of these GAPs by smallholder cocoa farmers in Ghana. A common approach to addressing this challenge is based on creating enabling conditions and offering appropriate incentives. We use the concepts of inscription and affordance to trace the vertically coordinated travel of recommended (...)
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  49.  1
    Work without workers: legal geographies of family farm exclusions from labour laws in Alberta, Canada.Emily Reid-Musson, Ellen MacEachen, Mary Beckie & Lars Hallström - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):1027-1038.
    Under the Canadian labour laws that govern workplace safety, wage, and other work conditions, ‘family’ workers are not covered by the law under special rules for agriculture. Among other legal exclusions, the family farm exclusion contributes to a dearth of basic work, health, and safety standards in the sector, despite the commercialization and industrialization of family farming activities. Through a focus on Alberta, Canada—where farm labour rules have only applied to agriculture since 2016—this article explores the family exclusion in relation (...)
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  50.  2
    “How do we measure justice?”: missions and metrics in urban agriculture.Sara Shostak - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):953-964.
    This paper offers a critical analysis of program evaluation in contemporary urban agriculture. Drawing on data from an exploratory study designed at the request of and in collaboration with urban agriculture practitioners in Massachusetts, it describes both their critiques of extant practices of program evaluation and their visions for alternative ways of telling the story of their work. Related, it explores practitioners’ interest in building capacity for policy advocacy, working collectively to create transformative social change, and, related, establishing new kinds (...)
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  51.  2
    Hitting the target and missing the point? On the risks of measuring women’s empowerment in agricultural development.Katie Tavenner & Todd A. Crane - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):849-857.
    There is a strong impetus in international agricultural development to close ‘gender gaps’ in agricultural productivity. The goal of empowering women is often framed as the solution to closing these gaps, stimulating the proliferation of new indicators and instruments for the targeting, measurement, and tracking of programmatic goals in research for agricultural development. Despite these advances, current measurements and indices remain too simplified in terms of unit and scope of analysis, as well as being fundamentally flawed in how they aim (...)
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  52.  3
    Understanding the challenges faced by Michigan’s family farmers: race/ethnicity and the impacts of a pandemic.Dorceta E. Taylor, Lina M. Farias, Lia M. Kahan, Julia Talamo, Alison Surdoval, Ember D. McCoy & Socorro M. Daupan - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (3):1077-1096.
    Michigan is a critical agricultural state, and small family farms are a crucial component of the state’s food sector. This paper examines how the race/ethnicity of the family farm owners/operators is related to farm characteristics, financing, and impacts of the pandemic. It compares 75 farms owned/operated solely by Whites and 15 with People of Color owners/operators. The essay examines how farmers finance their farm operations and the challenges they face doing so. The article also explores how the Coronavirus-19 pandemic affected (...)
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  53.  1
    Reflexive policies and the complex socio-ecological systems of the upland landscapes in Indonesia.Sacha Amaruzaman, Douglas K. Bardsley & Randy Stringer - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):683-700.
    Well-intended natural resource policies that ignore the complexity of socio-ecological systems too often threaten local values and opportunities for sustainable development. Upland areas throughout Indonesia provide examples of complex socio-ecological systems experiencing rapid socio-economic and environmental transformations in response to interactions between development policies and local agendas. Broad natural resource policies influence socio-ecological systems in different ways. In some cases, there are converging national and local goals, while in others the goals of national policy conflict with local aspirations. This study (...)
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  54.  3
    Does direct farm marketing fulfill its promises? analyzing job satisfaction among direct-market farmers in Canada.Stevens Azima & Patrick Mundler - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):791-807.
    Short food supply chains have become the focus of considerable research in the last two decades. However, studies so far remain highly localized, and claims about the economic and social advantages of such channels for farmers are not backed by large-scale empirical evidence. Using a web survey of 613 direct-market farmers across Canada, this article explores the potential economic and social benefits that farmers derive from participating in short food supply chains. We used multivariate analysis to test whether a farmer’s (...)
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  55.  6
    SNAP, campus food insecurity, and the politics of deservingness.Maggie Dickinson - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):605-616.
    Many low-income college students are barred from food assistance for no reason other than the fact that they are pursuing a college education. Based on 22 interviews that capture the experiences of food insecure college students as they attempt to navigate SNAP, this study shows how low enrollment in the program and food insecurity are the predictable outcomes of policy decisions intended to restrict access to both free public higher education and public assistance in the 1980’s and 1990’s and were (...)
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  56.  3
    Raj Patel: Stuffed and starved: the hidden battle for the world food system: Melville House, Brooklyn, New York, 2012, 432 pp, ISBN 978-1-61219-127-0.Kelley R. Gallop - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):841-842.
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  57.  2
    Examining farmers’ adoption of nutrient management best management practices: a social cognitive framework.Lijing Gao & J. Arbuckle - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):535-553.
    The Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy aims to reduce nutrient loads in waterways from nonpoint sources such as farm fields. Farmers’ voluntary adoption of soil and water conservation practices is crucial for achieving NRS goals. Although the Iowa NRS has been active since 2013, farmer participation and net pollutant reductions have been insufficient. Therefore, continued efforts to understand the motivations and barriers that underlie farmers’ conservation actions in a comprehensive and integrated manner are needed to improve outreach strategies, and research examining (...)
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  58.  4
    Development through commodification: exploring apple commodity production as pesticide promotion in the High Atlas.Zachary A. Goldberg - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):663-682.
    Global development initiatives frequently promote agricultural commodity chain projects to improve livelihoods. In Morocco, development projects, including the Plan Maroc Vert, have promoted apple production in rural regions of the country. In order to access domestic markets, these new apple producers often use pesticides to meet market standards. Through situated ethnographic inquiry and commodity chain analysis, using a combination of surveys and interviews with apple wholesalers, government officials, along with farmers, this paper works to critique the PMV’s development approach that (...)
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  59.  6
    Transforming landscapes and mindscapes through regenerative agriculture.Ethan Gordon, Federico Davila & Chris Riedy - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):809-826.
    Agriculture occupies 38% of the planet’s terrestrial surface, using 70% of freshwater resources. Its modern practice is dominated by an industrial–productivist discourse, which has contributed to the simplification and degradation of human and ecological systems. As such, agricultural transformation is essential for creating more sustainable food systems. This paper focuses on discursive change. A prominent discursive alternative to industrial–productivist agriculture is regenerative agriculture. Regenerative discourses are emergent, radically evolving and diverse. It is unclear whether they have the potential to generate (...)
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  60.  2
    Collaborative research as boundary work: learning between rice growers and conservation professionals to support habitat conservation on private lands.Erin Hardie Hale, Christopher C. Jadallah & Heidi L. Ballard - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):715-731.
    Multi-stakeholder initiatives for biodiversity conservation on working landscapes often necessitate strategies to facilitate learning in order to foster successful collaboration. To investigate the learning processes that both undergird and result from collaborative efforts, this case study employs the concept of boundary work as a lens to examine learning between rice growers and conservation professionals in California’s Central Valley, who were engaged in a collaborative research project focused on migratory bird conservation. Through analysis of workshop observations, project documents, and interviews with (...)
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  61.  3
    Discourses of sustainability and imperial modes of food provision: agri-food-businesses and consumers in Germany.Steffen Hirth, Theresa Bürstmayr & Anke Strüver - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):573-588.
    It is widely accepted that overcoming the social-ecological crises we face requires major changes to the food system. However, opinions diverge on the question whether those ‘great efforts’ towards sustainability require systemic changes or merely systematic ones. Drawing upon Brand and Wissen’s concept of “imperial modes of living”, we ask whether the lively debates about sustainability and ‘ethical’ consumption among producers and consumers in Germany are far reaching enough to sufficiently reduce the imperial weight on the environment and other human (...)
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  62.  2
    Food sovereignty and sustainability mid-pandemic: how Michigan’s experience of Covid-19 highlights chasms in the food system.Sarah King, Amy McFarland & Jody Vogelzang - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):827-838.
    This paper offers observations on people’s lived experience of the food system in Michigan during the early Covid-19 pandemic as an initial critical foray into the everyday pandemic food world. The Covid-19 crisis illuminates a myriad of adaptive food behaviors, as people struggle to address their destabilized lives, including the casual acknowledgement of the pandemic, then anxiety of the unknown, the subsequent new dependency, and the possible emergence of a new normal. The pandemic makes the injustices inherent in the food (...)
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  63.  2
    Colin Ray Anderson, Janneke Bruil, M. Jahi Chappell, Csilla Kiss, Michel Patrick Pimbert: Agroecology now! Transformations towards more just and sustainable food systems: Palgrave Macmillan, Cham, Switzerland, 2021, 199 pp, ISBN 978-3-030-61314-3 (book), ISBN 978-3-030-61315-0.Rafael Cavalcanti Lembi - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):839-840.
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  64.  4
    Cultural biodiversity unpacked, separating discourse from practice.Mariagiulia Mariani, Claire Cerdan & Iuri Peri - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):773-789.
    In this article, we question to what extent origin-food labels, namely Geographical Indications and Slow Food Presidia, may effectively account for cultural biodiversity. Building on Foucault’s discourse theory, we question how the Slow Food movement and GI promoters have developed their own discourse and practice on CB, how these discourses contrast, and how they inform projects. Focusing on the practices to cultivate the microbiological life of three origin labeled cheeses, we have revealed the gap between these institutional discourses and what (...)
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  65.  8
    Narrating agricultural resilience after Hurricane María: how smallholder farmers in Puerto Rico leverage self-sufficiency and collaborative agency in a climate-vulnerable food system.Abrania Marrero, Andrea Lόpez-Cepero, Ramón Borges-Méndez & Josiemer Mattei - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):555-571.
    Climate change is a threat to food system stability, with small islands particularly vulnerable to extreme weather events. In Puerto Rico, a diminished agricultural sector and resulting food import dependence have been implicated in reduced diet quality, rural impoverishment, and periodic food insecurity during natural disasters. In contrast, smallholder farmers in Puerto Rico serve as cultural emblems of self-sufficient food production, providing fresh foods to local communities in an informal economy and leveraging traditional knowledge systems to manage varying ecological and (...)
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  66.  2
    Richard A. Sikora, Eugene R. Terry, Paul L. G. Vlek and Joyce Chitja (eds): Transforming agriculture in southern Africa: Constraints, technologies, policies and processes: Routledge Press, New York, USA, 2020, 348 pp, ISBN 9781032083926. [REVIEW]Eliaza Mkuna - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):843-844.
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  67.  6
    Can agroecology and CRISPR mix? The politics of complementarity and moving toward technology sovereignty.Maywa Montenegro de Wit - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):733-755.
    Can gene editing and agroecology be complementary? Various formulations of this question now animate debates over the future of food systems, including in the UN Committee on World Food Security and at the UN Food Systems Summit. Previous analyses have discussed the risks of gene editing for agroecosystems, smallholders, and the concentration of wealth by and for agro-industry. This paper takes a different approach, unpacking the epistemic, socioeconomic, and ontological politics inherent in complementarity. I ask: How is complementarity understood? Who (...)
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  68.  3
    Digesting agriculture development: nutrition-oriented development and the political ecology of rice–body relations in India.Carly E. Nichols - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):757-771.
    Nutrition-sensitive agriculture has emerged as a major development paradigm that works to diversify crops and diets throughout the Global South in order to improve nutritional outcomes. Drawing on a conceptual framework from political ecologies of health that looks at political economic factors, social discourse, and embodied, material experiences of food, I analyze qualitative and ethnographic data from an integrated NSA intervention in Madhya Pradesh and Jharkhand, India. The analysis shows that while embodied experiences of differing rice varieties were central to (...)
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  69.  4
    Forging just dietary futures: bringing mainstream and critical nutrition into conversation.Carly Nichols, Halie Kampman & Mara van den Bold - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):633-644.
    Despite decades of action to reduce global malnutrition, rates of undernutrition remain stubbornly high and rates of overweight, obesity and chronic disease are simultaneously on the rise. Moreover, while volumes of robust research on causes and solutions to malnutrition have been published, and calls for interdisciplinarity are on the rise, researchers taking different epistemological and methodological choices have largely remained disciplinarily siloed. This paper works to open a scholarly conversation between “mainstream” public health nutrition and “critical” nutrition studies. While critical (...)
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  70.  1
    Can agriculture and conservation be compatible in a coastal wetland? Balancing stakeholders’ narratives and interactions in the management of El Hondo Natural Park, Spain.Sandra Ricart & Antonio M. Rico-Amorós - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):589-604.
    Coastal wetlands are among the most productive and valuable ecosystems worldwide, although one of the main factors affecting their survival is the coexistence between agriculture and conservation. This paper analyses the complex balance between agriculture and conservation coexistence in El Hondo Natural Park coastal wetland by examining stakeholders’ narratives, perceptions, and interactions. The aim is to highlight the concurrence between socio-economic progress and socio-environmental justice perspectives by identifying those driving factors motivating stakeholders’ conflicts while expanding stakeholders’ behaviour and interaction when (...)
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  71.  4
    Strategic framing of genome editing in agriculture: an analysis of the debate in Germany in the run-up to the European Court of Justice ruling.Robin Siebert, Christian Herzig & Marc Birringer - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):617-632.
    New techniques in genome editing have led to a controversial debate about the opportunities and uncertainties they present for agricultural food production and consumption. In July 2018, the Court of Justice of the European Union defined genome editing as a new process of mutagenesis, which implies that the resulting organisms count as genetically modified and are subject, in principle, to the obligations of EU Directive 2001/18/EG. This paper examines how key protagonists from academia, politics, and the economy strategically framed the (...)
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  72.  5
    The agroecological transition in Senegal: transnational links and uneven empowerment.Sébastien Boillat, Raphaël Belmin & Patrick Bottazzi - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):281-300.
    Senegal is among the few African countries that counts with an important agroecological movement. This movement is strongly backed up by a network of transnational partnerships and has recently matured into an advocacy coalition that promotes an agroecological transition at national scale. In this article, we investigate the role of transnational links on the empowerment potential of agroecology. Combining the multi-level perspective of socio-technical transitions and Bourdieu’s theory of practices, we conceptualize the agroecological network as a niche shaped by the (...)
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  73.  2
    Pathways towards coexistence with large carnivores in production systems.L. Boronyak, B. Jacobs, A. Wallach, J. McManus, S. Stone, S. Stevenson, B. Smuts & H. Zaranek - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):47-64.
    Coexistence between livestock grazing and carnivores in rangelands is a major challenge in terms of sustainable agriculture, animal welfare, species conservation and ecosystem function. Many effective non-lethal tools exist to protect livestock from predation, yet their adoption remains limited. Using a social-ecological transformations framework, we present two qualitative models that depict transformative change in rangelands grazing. Developed through participatory processes with stakeholders from South Africa and the United States of America, the models articulate drivers of change and the essential pathways (...)
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  74.  5
    Behind the scenes of a learning agri-food value chain: lessons from action research.Charis Linda Braun, Vera Bitsch & Anna Maria Häring - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):119-134.
    The development of sustainable agri-food systems requires not only new academic knowledge, but also concrete social and organizational change in practice. This article reflects on the action research process that supported and explored the learning process in an emerging agri-food value chain in the Berlin-Brandenburg region in eastern Germany. The action research study involved value chain actors, academic researchers, and process facilitators in a learning network. By framing the network’s learning and problem solving processes in concepts of organizational learning, lessons (...)
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  75.  3
    Citizen views on genome editing: effects of species and purpose.Gesa Busch, Erin Ryan, Marina A. G. von Keyserlingk & Daniel M. Weary - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):151-164.
    Public opinion can affect the adoption of genome editing technologies. In food production, genome editing can be applied to a wide range of applications, in different species and with different purposes. This study analyzed how the public responds to five different applications of genome editing, varying the species involved and the proposed purpose of the modification. Three of the applications described the introduction of disease resistance within different species, and two targeted product quality and quantity in cattle. Online surveys in (...)
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  76.  6
    Cacao cultivation as a livelihood strategy: contributions to the well-being of Colombian rural households.Héctor Eduardo Hernández-Núñez, Isabel Gutiérrez-Montes, Angie Paola Bernal-Núñez, Gustavo Adolfo Gutiérrez-García, Juan Carlos Suárez, Fernando Casanoves & Cornelia Butler Flora - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):201-216.
    Cacao cultivation is one of the most important livelihoods for rural households in Colombia, where it is promoted as a substitute for the illegal cultivation of coca. To strengthen Colombian cacao farming, it is important to understand the livelihood strategies associated with cacao cultivation and the impact of these different strategies on the well-being of Colombian rural households. We analyzed the impact of cacao cultivation on the livelihood strategies and well-being of rural households in western Colombia. Research with 92 rural (...)
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  77.  3
    Alex Blanchette: Porkopolis: American animality, standardized life, and the factory farm.Michaela Hoffelmeyer - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):497-498.
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  78.  9
    Seeking justice, eating toxics: overlooked contaminants in urban community gardens.Melanie Malone - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):165-184.
    Over the past several decades, urban community gardens have arisen in diverse and economically compromised neighborhoods across the U.S. as part of multiple environmental justice efforts. Urban community gardens have enabled users to mitigate the effects of many environmental injustices such as the impact of food deserts, nutrient poor food found at convenience stores, and pesticide laden grocery items. While these benefits have promulgated across the U.S., community gardens are also well known to be located in historically contaminated locations in (...)
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  79.  4
    Searching for the plot: narrative self-making and urban agriculture during the economic crisis in Slovenia.Petra Matijevic - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):301-314.
    Analyses of household urban agriculture have demonstrated a wealth of personal, economic, social, moral or political uses for self-provisioned food, yet have often understood the practice itself as merely a production process. This ‘means-to-an-end’ perspective is especially pronounced in studies of locations undergoing economic hardship. Urban gardening in postsocialist Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union has been framed as an element of an informal economy, enabling household savings, access to informal networks and avoidance of industrial goods deemed (...)
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  80.  2
    AFHVS 2021 Presidential Address: critical praxis and the social imaginary for food systems transformation.Kim L. Niewolny - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):1-4.
    In this 2021 AFHVS Presidential Address, Kim Niewolny provides a brief foray into the onto-epistemic framing of critical praxis for sustainable food systems transformation. Niewolny proposes we engage in the creative entanglement of critical praxis and the social imaginary to “unthink” the orthodoxies that govern our ideas of the possible. She offers several possibilities as pathways toward a food system that embodies health equity, ecological justice, land sovereignty, and human rights, including: agroecological research and movement building; food, farm, and health (...)
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  81.  5
    Who is ruining farmers markets? Crowds, fraud, and the fantasy of “real food”.Sang-Hyoun Pahk - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):19-31.
    Critical food scholars have long noted that much of local food discourse in the US is underwritten by a deeply regressive agrarian imaginary that valorizes “small family farms” while erasing historical legacies of racism. In this paper, I examine one influential expression of the agrarian imaginary that I call the fantasy of “real food,” and illustrate how that discourse contributes to ongoing exclusions in farmers markets. Drawing on Lacanian psychoanalysis, I explain how the fantasy of real food positions white middle-class (...)
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  82.  7
    Cultivating health: diabetes resilience through neo-traditional farming in Mopan Maya communities of Belize.Michelle Schmidt - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):269-279.
    My research explores Maya perspectives on neo-traditional farming as a source of metabolic health and resilience to the global epidemic of type-two diabetes. This article is based on long-term ethnographic research and interviews in Maya Mountains Reservation communities in southern Belize, an area with low diabetes prevalence relative to national and global populations. Research participants see lower rates of diabetes in the MMR as the result of neo-traditional peasant and subsistence farming on ancestral lands. Good metabolic health represents the embodiment (...)
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  83.  9
    The embodied precarity of year-round agricultural work: health and safety risks among Latino/a immigrant dairy farmworkers in New York.Kathleen Sexsmith - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):357-370.
    This paper analyzes how industrial agricultural production and an exclusionary immigration regime produce an embodied form of precarity among an undocumented immigrant labor force in the New York dairy industry, a much-celebrated engine of rural economic growth. In this industry, immigrant workers settle for years at a time, forming ethnic enclaves from which employers source workers for low-wage, exhausting, dangerous, year-round jobs. While much of the literature on migrant worker precarity has focused on temporary, insecure, flexible, and informal workers, this (...)
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  84.  2
    A transdisciplinary study of agroecological niches: understanding sustainability transitions in vineyards.Naama Teschner & Daniel E. Orenstein - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):33-45.
    Despite a widely agreed necessity for agroecological transition, there are various substantial constraints that hinder the adoption of alternative, more sustainable, practices. We employ the niche management concept to examine the initial phases of transition in the local wine-growing niche in Israel, or specifically, the replacement of herbicides with the use of cover-crops combined with the practice of mowing of herbaceous growth using specialized trimming machines. Our goal is to uncover the triggers, drivers and agents of change in farming practices (...)
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  85.  2
    Seeing the workers for the trees: exalted and devalued manual labour in the Pacific Northwest craft cider industry.Anelyse M. Weiler - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):65-78.
    Craft food and beverage makers regularly emphasize transparency about the ethical, sustainable sourcing of their ingredients and the human labour underpinning their production, all of which helps elevate the status of their products and occupational communities. Yet, as with other niche ethical consumption markets, craft industries continue to rely on employment conditions for agricultural workers that reproduce inequalities of race, class, and citizenship in the dominant food system. This paper interrogates the contradiction between the exaltation of craft cidermakers’ labour and (...)
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  86.  2
    Anitra Nelson and Ferne Edwards (Eds.): Food for degrowth: perspectives and practices.Kerry Woodward - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):499-500.
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