Year:

  1.  8
    Introduction to the Symposium on Critical Adult Education in Food Movements: Learning for Transformation in and Beyond Food Movements—the Why, Where, How and the What Next?C. R. Anderson, R. Binimelis, M. P. Pimbert & M. G. Rivera-Ferre - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):521-529.
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  2.  10
    Transformative Agroecology Learning in Europe: Building Consciousness, Skills and Collective Capacity for Food Sovereignty.Colin R. Anderson, Chris Maughan & Michel P. Pimbert - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):531-547.
    Agroecology has been proposed as a key building block for food sovereignty. This article examines the meaning, practices and potentials of ‘transformative agroecology learning’ as a collective strategy for food system transformation. Our study is based on our qualitative and action research with the European Coordination of Via Campesina to develop the European Agroecology Knowledge Exchange Network. This network is linked to the global network of La Via Campesina and builds on the strong experiences and traditions of popular education in (...)
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  3.  11
    The Foundations of Institutional-Based Trust in Farmers’ Markets.Lijun Angelia Chen, Bruno Varella Miranda, Joe L. Parcell & Chao Chen - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):395-410.
    How do calculative trust and relational trust influence the emergence of institutional-based trust in farmers’ markets? We fill a gap in the literature by studying how diverse forms of trust influence the way frequent consumers evaluate the institutions of a farmers’ market. We analyze a data set of 687 frequent shoppers from the U.S. state of Missouri, assessing the institutional-based trust in farmers’ markets in comparison with the level of institutional-based trust in conventional food systems. The results suggest that calculative (...)
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  4.  9
    Chritina D. Rosan and Hamil Pearsall: Growing a Sustainable City? The Question of Urban Agriculture.Alana N. Chriest - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):647-648.
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  5.  9
    “Our School System is Trying to Be Agrarian”: Educating for Reskilling and Food System Transformation in the Rural School Garden.Sarah E. Cramer, Anna L. Ball & Mary K. Hendrickson - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):507-519.
    School gardens and garden-based learning continue to gain great popularity in the United States, and their pedagogical potential, and ability to impact students’ fruit and vegetable consumption and activity levels have been well-documented. Less examined is their potential to be agents of food system reskilling and transformation. Though producer and consumer are inextricably linked in the food system, and deskilling of one directly influences the other, theorists often focus on production-centered and consumption-centered deskilling separately. However, in a school garden, the (...)
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  6.  7
    Analysis of the Consumer’s Perception of Urban Food Products From a Soilless System in Rooftop Greenhouses: A Case Study From the Mediterranean Area of Barcelona.Mireia Ercilla-Montserrat, David Sanjuan-Delmás, Esther Sanyé-Mengual, Laura Calvet-Mir, Karla Banderas, Joan Rieradevall & Xavier Gabarrell - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):375-393.
    Soilless crops are commonly used in rooftop agriculture because they easily adapt to building constraints. However, acceptance of the produce derived from this system may be controversial. This paper evaluates consumers’ acceptance of food from RA in Mediterranean cities, focusing on the quality of the product, production system, and consumers’ motivations. We surveyed 238 respondents on the UAB university campus as potential consumers. The survey was distributed via an Internet-link that was provided along with a sample of tomatoes from RA. (...)
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  7.  5
    Multi-Actor Networks and Innovation Niches: University Training for Local Agroecological Dynamization.Josep Espluga, Marina Masso, Laura Calvet-Mir & Daniel López-García - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):567-579.
    The global environmental and social-economic crises of industrialized agriculture have led to the emergence of agroecology as an alternative approach aiming to increase the ecological, social and economic sustainability of agri–food systems. The ‘multi-level perspective’ is now a widely used framework to understand and promote the upscaling of local innovation niches, such as agroecology, to broader scales, thus reconfiguring the dominant socio-technical regimes. Additionally, emergent ‘hybrid forums’ can provide a space between niche and regime where niche innovators can become important (...)
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  8.  10
    Farming for Change: Developing a Participatory Curriculum on Agroecology, Nutrition, Climate Change and Social Equity in Malawi and Tanzania.Rachel Bezner Kerr, Sera L. Young, Carrie Young, Marianne V. Santoso, Mufunanji Magalasi, Martin Entz, Esther Lupafya, Laifolo Dakishoni, Vicki Morrone, David Wolfe & Sieglinde S. Snapp - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):549-566.
    How to engage farmers that have limited formal education is at the foundation of environmentally-sound and equitable agricultural development. Yet there are few examples of curricula that support the co-development of knowledge with farmers. While transdisciplinary and participatory techniques are considered key components of agroecology, how to do so is rarely specified and few materials are available, especially those relevant to smallholder farmers with limited formal education in Sub-Saharan Africa. The few training materials that exist provide appropriate methods, such as (...)
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  9.  2
    Farming God’s Way: Agronomy and Faith Contested.Kendra Kooy & Harry Spaling - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):411-426.
    Farming God’s Way is a type of conservation agriculture that re-interprets the CA principles of no tillage, mulching and crop rotation using biblical metaphors such as God doesn’t plow, God’s blanket, and the Garden of Eden. Through faith-based networks, FGW has spread throughout Sub-Saharan Africa, and beyond, as a development intervention for improving food security, adapting to climate change, and restoring soil productivity for resource-poor farming households. This research identifies and compares the production, sustainability and faith claims of FGW to (...)
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  10.  10
    Community Food Assistance, Informal Social Networks, and the Labor of Care.Hilda Kurtz, Abigail Borron, Jerry Shannon & Alexis Weaver - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):495-505.
    In 2016, the Atlanta Community Food Bank launched the Stabilizing Lives project to develop programs and policies that could better address clients’ needs as well as including clientele as part of the planning process. The ACFB partnered with a research team at the University of Georgia to conduct a participatory research project aimed at developing deeper insights into the factors contributing to both instability and stability in the lives of pantry clientele. This article describes the outcomes this research, offering both (...)
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  11.  9
    Multi-Actor Networks and Innovation Niches: University Training for Local Agroecological Dynamization.Daniel López-García, Laura Calvet-Mir, Marina Di Masso & Josep Espluga - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):567-579.
    The global environmental and social-economic crises of industrialized agriculture have led to the emergence of agroecology as an alternative approach aiming to increase the ecological, social and economic sustainability of agri–food systems. The ‘multi-level perspective’ is now a widely used framework to understand and promote the upscaling of local innovation niches, such as agroecology, to broader scales, thus reconfiguring the dominant socio-technical regimes. Additionally, emergent ‘hybrid forums’ can provide a space between niche and regime where niche innovators can become important (...)
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  12.  11
    Justin Nordstrom : Aunt Sammy’s Radio Recipes: The Original 1927 Cookbook and Housekeeper’s Chat.Katherine Magruder - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):641-642.
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  13.  14
    What’s Wrong with Permaculture Design Courses? Brazilian Lessons for Agroecological Movement-Building in Canada.Marie-Josée Massicotte & Christopher Kelly-Bisson - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):581-594.
    This paper focuses on the centrality of permaculture design courses as the principal sociopolitical strategy of the permaculture community in Canada to transform local food production practices. Building on the work of Antonio Gramsci and political agroecology as a framework of analysis, we argue that permaculture instruction remains deeply embedded within market and colonial relations, which orients the pedagogy of permaculture trainings in such a way as to reproduce the basic elements of the colonial capitalist economy among its practitioners. In (...)
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  14.  15
    Teaching the Territory: Agroecological Pedagogy and Popular Movements.Nils McCune & Marlen Sánchez - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):595-610.
    This contribution traces the parallel development of two distinct approaches to peasant agroecological education: the peasant-to-peasant horizontal method that disseminated across Mesoamerica and the Caribbean beginning in the 1970s, and the political-agroecological training schools of combined consciousness-building and skill-formation that have been at the heart of the educational processes of member organizations of La Via Campesina since the 1990s. Applying a theoretical framework that incorporates territorial struggle, agroecology and popular education, we examine spatial and organizational aspects of each of these (...)
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  15.  9
    Food Sovereignty Education Across the Americas: Multiple Origins, Converging Movements.David Meek, Katharine Bradley, Bruce Ferguson, Lesli Hoey, Helda Morales, Peter Rosset & Rebecca Tarlau - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):611-626.
    Social movements are using education to generate critical consciousness regarding the social and environmental unsustainability of the current food system, and advocate for agroecological production. In this article, we explore results from a cross-case analysis of six social movements that are using education as a strategy to advance food sovereignty. We conducted participatory research with diverse rural and urban social movements in the United States, Brazil, Cuba, Bolivia, and Mexico, which are each educating for food sovereignty. We synthesize insights from (...)
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  16.  12
    Images of Work, Images of Defiance: Engaging Migrant Farm Worker Voice Through Community-Based Arts.J. Adam Perry - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):627-640.
    This article addresses a stated need within the food justice movement scholarship to increase the attention paid to the political socialization of hired farm hands in industrial agriculture. In Canada, tackling the problem of farm worker equity has particular social and political contours related to the Canadian horticultural industry’s reliance on a state-managed migrant agricultural labour program designed to fill the sector’s labour market demands. As Canada’s Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program produces relations of ‘unfree labour’, engaging migrant farm workers in (...)
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  17.  8
    Gendered Agrobiodiversity Management and Adaptation to Climate Change: Differentiated Strategies in Two Marginal Rural Areas of India.Federica Ravera, Victoria Reyes-García, Unai Pascual, Adam G. Drucker, David Tarrasón & Mauricio R. Bellon - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):455-474.
    Social and cultural contexts influence power dynamics and shape gender perceptions, roles, and decisions regarding the management of agrobiodiversity for dealing with and adapting to climate change. Based on a feminist political ecology framework and a mixed method approach, this research performs an empirical analysis of two case studies in the northern of India, one in the Himalayan Mountains and another in the Indian-Gangetic plains. It explores context-specific influence of gender roles and responsibilities on on-farm agrobiodiversity management gendered expertise and (...)
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  18.  8
    Explaining the Uncertainty: Understanding Small-Scale Farmers’ Cultural Beliefs and Reasoning of Drought Causes in Gaza Province, Southern Mozambique.Daniela Salite - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):427-441.
    This paper explores small-scale farmers’ cultural beliefs about the causes of drought events and the reasoning behind their beliefs. Cultural beliefs vary across countries, regions, communities, and social groups; this paper takes the case of farmers from Gaza Province in southern Mozambique as its focus. Findings show that the farmers have a limited knowledge and understanding of the scientific explanation about drought. Thus, farmers’ beliefs about the causes of drought are strongly based on the indigenous and Christian philosophies that attribute (...)
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  19.  15
    Joshua Sbicca. Food Justice Now! Deepening the Roots of Social Struggle.Annie Shattuck & M. Jahi Chappell - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):643-644.
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  20.  2
    Farming for Change: Developing a Participatory Curriculum on Agroecology, Nutrition, Climate Change and Social Equity in Malawi and Tanzania.Sieglinde Snapp, David Wolfe, Vicki Morrone, Laifolo Dakishoni, Esther Lupafya, Martin Entz, Mufunanji Magalasi, Marianne Santoso, Carrie Young, Sera Young & Rachel Bezner Kerr - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):549-566.
    How to engage farmers that have limited formal education is at the foundation of environmentally-sound and equitable agricultural development. Yet there are few examples of curricula that support the co-development of knowledge with farmers. While transdisciplinary and participatory techniques are considered key components of agroecology, how to do so is rarely specified and few materials are available, especially those relevant to smallholder farmers with limited formal education in Sub-Saharan Africa. The few training materials that exist provide appropriate methods, such as (...)
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  21.  7
    Farming God’s Way: Agronomy and Faith Contested.Harry Spaling & Kendra Vander Kooy - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):411-426.
    Farming God’s Way is a type of conservation agriculture that re-interprets the CA principles of no tillage, mulching and crop rotation using biblical metaphors such as God doesn’t plow, God’s blanket, and the Garden of Eden. Through faith-based networks, FGW has spread throughout Sub-Saharan Africa, and beyond, as a development intervention for improving food security, adapting to climate change, and restoring soil productivity for resource-poor farming households. This research identifies and compares the production, sustainability and faith claims of FGW to (...)
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  22.  7
    Beyond ‘Hobby Farming’: Towards a Typology of Non-Commercial Farming.Lee-Ann Sutherland, Carla Barlagne & Andrew P. Barnes - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):475-493.
    In this paper we develop a typology of ‘non-commercial’ approaches to farming, based on a survey of a representative sample of farmers in Scotland, United Kingdom. In total, 395 farmers indicated that they do not seek to make a profit on their farms. We estimate that these non-commercial approaches to farming are utilised on at least 13% of agricultural land in Scotland. As such, non-commercial farming is not a marginal practice, nor are NCF limited to small-scale ‘hobby’ farms: NCF exist (...)
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  23.  7
    Michelle Phillipov: Media and Food Industries: The New Politics of Food.Luke van Ryn - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):645-646.
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  24.  7
    Which Communication Channels Shape Normative Perceptions About Buying Local Food? An Application of Social Exposure.Laura Witzling, Bret Shaw & David Trechter - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):443-454.
    We examined how information from multiple communication channels can inform social norms about local food purchasing. The concept of social exposure was used as a guide. Social exposure articulates how information in social, symbolic, and physical environments contributes to normative perceptions. Data was collected from a sample in Wisconsin. Results indicated that information from communication channels representing symbolic, social, and physical environments all contributed to normative perceptions. We also found that for individuals who frequent farmers’ markets, information from some communication (...)
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  25.  13
    Food Poverty, Food Waste and the Consensus Frame on Charitable Food Redistribution in Italy.Sabrina Arcuri - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):263-275.
    Food poverty and food waste are two major contemporary food system problems, which have gained prominence amongst both scholars and policy-makers, due to recent economic and environmental concerns. In this context, the culturally dominant perspective portrays charitable food redistribution as a “win–win solution” to confront food poverty and food waste in affluent societies, although this view is contested by many scholars. This paper applies the notions of framings and flat/sharp keyings to unpack the different narratives entailed by public discourses on (...)
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  26.  7
    Susan L. Marquis: I Am Not a Tractor!: How Florida Farmworkers Took on the Fast Food Giants and Won.Florence A. Becot - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):369-370.
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  27.  8
    Symposium Introduction—Ethics and Sustainable Agri-Food Governance: Appraisal and New Directions.Gianluca Brunori, Damian Maye, Francesca Galli & David Barling - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):257-261.
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  28.  12
    Systemic Ethics and Inclusive Governance: Two Key Prerequisites for Sustainability Transitions of Agri-Food Systems.Sibylle Bui, Ionara Costa, Olivier De Schutter, Tom Dedeurwaerdere, Marek Hudon & Marlene Feyereisen - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):277-288.
    Food retailers are powerful actors of the agro-industrial food system. They exert strong lock-in effects that hinder transitions towards more sustainable agri-food systems. Indeed, their marketing practices generally result in excluding the most sustainable food products, such as local, low-input, small-scale farmers’ products. Recently in Belgium, several initiatives have been created to enable the introduction of local products on supermarket shelves. In this article, we study three of those initiatives to analyse if the development of local sourcing in supermarkets opens (...)
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  29.  12
    Desert Wonderings: Reimagining Food Access Mapping.Kathryn Teigen De Master & Jess Daniels - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):241-256.
    For over 20 years, the concept of “food deserts” has served as an evocative metaphor, signifying spatialized patterns of injustice associated with low access to nutritious foods through retail and social exclusion. Yet in spite of its pithy appeal, scholars and activists increasingly critique the food desert concept as stigmatizing, inaccurate, and insufficient to characterize entrenched structural inequities. These well-founded critiques demonstrate a convincing need to reframe approaches to spatialized food injustice. We argue that food desert maps, which aim to (...)
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  30.  8
    The Impact of Supermarket Supply Chain Governance on Smallholder Farmer Cooperatives: The Case of Walmart in Nicaragua.Sara D. Elder - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):213-224.
    Non-governmental organizations and governments are promoting cooperatives as key to linking smallholder farmers with modern markets to achieve inclusive development, yet the specifics of these supply relationships remain poorly understood. This article uses data from 51 interviews with supply chain stakeholders and a survey of 110 smallholder vegetable farmers in Nicaragua to investigate the impact of cooperative-supermarket supply chain relationships on cooperatives, and the role retailers and NGOs play in facilitating these relationships. The study found that in Nicaragua, cooperatives selling (...)
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  31.  7
    Food Waste Reduction and Food Poverty Alleviation: A System Dynamics Conceptual Model.Francesca Galli, Alessio Cavicchi & Gianluca Brunori - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):289-300.
    The contradictions between food poverty affecting a large section of the global population and the everyday wastage of food, particularly in high income countries, have raised significant academic and public attention. All actors in the food chain have a role to play in food waste prevention and reduction, including farmers, food manufacturers and processors, caterers and retailers and ultimately consumers. Food surplus redistribution is considered by many as a partial solution to food waste reduction and food poverty mitigation, while others (...)
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  32.  6
    Correction To: Ethics and Responsibilisation in Agri-Food Governance: The Single-Use Plastics Debate and Strategies to Introduce Reusable Coffee Cups in UK Retail Chains.Damian Maye, James Kirwan & Gianluca Brunori - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):313-314.
    The original version of this article has been corrected due to typesetting mistakes regarding Fig. 1.
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  33.  13
    Ethics and Responsibilisation in Agri-Food Governance: The Single-Use Plastics Debate and Strategies to Introduce Reusable Coffee Cups in UK Retail Chains.Damian Maye, James Kirwan & Gianluca Brunori - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):301-312.
    This paper extends arguments about the potential for reflexive governance in agri-food sustainability by linking food ethics to the notion of ‘unintended consequences’ and ‘responsibilisation’. Analysis of sustainable consumption governance shows the way authorities and intermediaries use food waste reduction projects to ‘responsibilise’ the consumer, including recent examples of shared responsibility. This paper takes this argument further by developing a ‘strategies of responsibilisation’ framework that connects relations between food system outcomes, problematisation in public discourse and strategies of responsibilisation in agri-food (...)
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  34.  6
    ‘Fractures’ in Food Practices: Exploring Transitions Towards Sustainable Food.Kirstie J. O’Neill, Adrian K. Clear, Adrian Friday & Mike Hazas - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):225-239.
    Emissions arising from the production and consumption of food are acknowledged as a major contributor to climate change. From a consumer’s perspective, however, the sustainability of food may have many meanings: it may result from eating less meat, becoming vegetarian, or choosing to buy local or organic food. To explore what food sustainability means to consumers, and what factors lead to changes in food practice, we adopt a sociotechnical approach to compare the food consumption practices in North West England with (...)
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  35.  5
    Responsible Innovation Through Conscious Contestation at the Interface of Agricultural Science, Policy, and Civil Society.Laxmi Prasad Pant - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):183-197.
    This research examines a series of case studies from the agricultural sector to illustrate how various models of innovation embrace value proposition. A conscious value contestation at the interface of science, policy and civil society requires transformations in the triple-helix model of university-government-industry collaboration, because reiterations in the triple-helix model of innovation, such as quadruple, quintuple and higher helices, do not necessarily address civil society concerns for human values and science ethics. This research develops and tests a matrix model of (...)
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  36.  10
    Faith in International Agricultural Development: Conservation Agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa.Corné J. Rademaker & Henk Jochemsen - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):199-212.
    The role of faith and religion in international development cooperation is hotly debated today. The legitimacy of this role remains, however, often confided to instrumental reasons. Yet, thinking about faith and religion only in instrumental terms leaves unquestioned the possibility of a religious background of development cooperation as a practice itself and the potential role of faith through individual practitioners that operate within secular NGOs, and research and policy institutes. The aim of the present paper is therefore to consider the (...)
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  37.  8
    Alison Hope Alkon and Julie Guthman : The New Food Activism: Opposition, Cooperation, and Collective Action.Kelsey Ryan-Simkins - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):371-372.
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  38.  11
    Establishing Ethical Organic Poultry Production: A Question of Successful Cooperation Management?Martina Schäfer - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):315-327.
    In reaction to growing critics regarding ecological and ethical aspects of intensive animal husbandry, different initiatives of ethical poultry production try to establish alternative food supply chains on the market. To be able to stabilise these niche innovations parallel to the mainstream regime, new forms of cooperation along the value added chain and with the consumers play an important role. Based on a case study of integrated egg and meat production from a dual-purpose breed by small multifunctional farms in Northeast (...)
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  39.  7
    ‘The Right Thing to Do’: Ethical Motives in the Interpretation of Social Sustainability in the UK’s Conventional Food Supply.Rosalind Sharpe & David Barling - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):329-340.
    This paper explores the role of ethics and responsibility as drivers of a transition to a more sustainable agri-food system, by drawing on an investigation of the governance of social sustainability in the UK’s conventional food supply. The paper investigates how and why various non-state actors in the conventional food supply construe certain social obligations as being part of the remit of the food supply; whether ethics plays a motivating role; and the extent to which their activities are linked to (...)
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  40.  15
    John Lever and Johan Fischer: Religion, Regulation, Consumption: Globalising Kosher and Halal Markets.Janet Smith - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):365-366.
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  41.  8
    Qing Li: Forest Bathing – How Trees Can Help You Find Health and Happiness.S. Suresh Ramanan - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):367-368.
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  42.  5
    Charitable Food Aid in Finland: From a Social Issue to an Environmental Solution.Ville Tikka - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):341-352.
    Since the establishment of the first food bank in 1995, charitable food aid has become entrenched in Finland as a seemingly irreplaceable solution to food poverty. Further, it has recently been suggested that the focus of food aid activities is shifting from food poverty and temporary hunger alleviation towards environmental sustainability through addressing food waste via organized re-distribution of expiring food from retail to charitable organizations. This potentially creates a mechanism that solidifies food poverty and fortifies the paradoxical situation where (...)
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  43.  5
    Whose Ethics and for Whom? Dealing with Ethical Disputes in Agri-Food Governance.Talis Tisenkopfs, Emils Kilis, Mikelis Grivins & Anda Adamsone-Fiskovica - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):353-364.
    In contemporary societies there is a continuous process of creation and destruction of ethics. Shared norms are fuzzy, as actors tend to share core principles but interpret them differently. In this paper we analyse three cases of ethical dispute in the agri-food sector by employing the distinction between matters of fact and matters of concern proposed by Bruno Latour. We further suggest that ethics in the agri-food industry should be considered in relation to collective goals such as sustainability and social (...)
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  44.  11
    Inequality Regimes in Indonesian Dairy Cooperatives: Understanding Institutional Barriers to Gender Equality.Gea D. M. Wijers - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (2):167-181.
    Women are important actors in smallholder farmer milk production. Therefore, female input in the dairy cooperatives is essential to dairy development in emerging economies. Within dairy value chains, however, their contributions are often not formally acknowledged or rewarded. This article contributes to filling this gap by adopting a multileveled institutional perspective to explore the case of dairy development in the Pangalengan mixed-sex dairy cooperative on West Java, Indonesia. The objective is to add evidence from the dairy development practice in Indonesia (...)
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  45.  10
    Farmers Framing Fatherhood: Everyday Life and Rural Change.Berit Brandth - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):49-59.
    This article explores how farming fathers frame fatherhood according to time-specific ideals. Based on interviews with fathers and their adult sons in Norway, findings show clear differences between the two generations concerning how fathers engage with their children and justify their practices. For the older generation, the major frames are “complementary gender roles,” “good farming practices” and “farm succession.” The current generation frames their fathering practices in “involved fathering,” “changing childhoods” and “intensive parenting.” Considering where the frames come from, it (...)
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  46.  15
    Naturecultures and the Affective Entanglements of Happy Meat.Heide K. Bruckner, Annalisa Colombino & Ulrich Ermann - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):35-47.
    In recent decades, there has been a proliferation of alternative food networks which promote an agenda of reconnection, allegedly linking consumers and producers to the socio-ecological origins of food. Rarely, however, does the AFN literature address “origins” of food in terms of animals, as in the case of meat. This article takes a relational approach to the reconnection agenda between humans and animals by discussing how the phenomenon of animal welfare and “happy” meat are enacted by producers and consumers in (...)
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  47.  7
    Community Gardens and the Making of Organic Subjects: A Case Study From the Peruvian Andes.Kevin Cody - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):105-116.
    This research contributes to emergent theories on subject formation by showing how community garden participants in a small rural town in Northern Peru came to embrace a set of ideas and practices related to organic agriculture. Most CG scholarship describes the myriad benefits for participants and their communities, as well as individuals’ motivations for wanting to grow their own food. Relatively little research has explored how various kinds of gardens and their organizers produce subjects. Drawing from scholarship on community gardens (...)
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  48.  11
    The Impact of Shale Development on Crop Farmers: How the Size and Location of Farms Matter.Jessica A. Crowe - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):17-33.
    New technologies coupled with high energy prices, a desire for energy independence, and cleaner energy, have led to many energy companies investing large amounts of capital into rural places. In the last decade, along with solar and wind, unconventional shale oil and gas production has risen steeply throughout the United States boosting economic growth and stimulating wealth creation in many communities. Because farmers own or operate over half of rural lands in the lower 48 states, the possibility is high for (...)
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  49.  12
    Doing but Not Knowing: How Apple Farmers Comply with Standards in China.Jiping Ding, Paule Moustier, Xingdong Ma, Xuexi Huo & Xiangping Jia - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):61-75.
    Are public and private standards affecting farmer knowledge and moving farm practices toward food safety and environmental sustainability in China? We surveyed 355 apple farmers involved in chains supplying a diversity of retailing points, including supermarkets. Using a multivariate regression model, we find no measurable evidence that the certification schemes of farm bases and agribusiness companies lead to improved apple growers’ knowledge regarding pest and disease management. The observed behavioral changes are mainly prompted by delegated decision-making towards leaders of farm (...)
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  50.  16
    Racial, Ethnic and Gender Inequities in Farmland Ownership and Farming in the U.S.Megan Horst & Amy Marion - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):1-16.
    This paper provides an analysis of U.S. farmland owners, operators, and workers by race, ethnicity, and gender. We first review the intersection between racialized and gendered capitalism and farmland ownership and farming in the United States. Then we analyze data from the 2014 Tenure and Ownership Agricultural Land survey, the 2012 Census of Agriculture, and the 2013–2014 National Agricultural Worker Survey to demonstrate that significant nation-wide disparities in farming by race, ethnicity and gender persist in the U.S. In 2012–2014, White (...)
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  51.  7
    Is There an “Ideal Feeder”? How Healthy and Eco-Friendly Food Consumption Choices Impact Judgments of Parents.Emily Huddart Kennedy & Julie A. Kmec - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):137-151.
    On top of working longer hours in paid employment and spending more time actively caring for children, parents, especially mothers, also feel pressured to safeguard the health of their children and the planet through their food consumption choices. Surprisingly, little evidence identifies whether the health value and environmental impact of food consumption choices impact judgments of parents’ abilities, morality, or general worth. We address this gap by drawing on an experiment administered to an online convenience sample of the United States (...)
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  52.  12
    How Consumers Use Mandatory Genetic Engineering Labels: Evidence From Vermont.Jane Kolodinsky, Sean Morris & Orest Pazuniak - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):117-125.
    Food labels legislated by the U.S. government have been designed to provide information to consumers. It has been asserted that the simple disclosures “produced using genetic engineering” on newly legislated U.S. food labels will send a signal that influences individual preferences rather than providing information. Vermont is the only US state to have experienced mandatory labeling of foods produced using genetic engineering via simple disclosures. Using a representative sample of adults who experienced Vermont’s mandatory GE labeling policy, we examined whether (...)
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  53.  8
    “We Do This Because the Market Demands It”: Alternative Meat Production and the Speciesist Logic.Markus Lundström - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):127-136.
    The past decades’ substantial growth in globalized meat consumption continues to shape the international political economy of food and agriculture. This political economy of meat composes a site of contention; in Brazil, where livestock production is particularly thriving, large agri-food corporations are being challenged by alternative food networks. This article analyzes experiential and experimental accounts of such an actor—a collectivized pork cooperative tied to Brazil’s Landless Movement—which seeks to navigate the political economy of meat. The ethnographic case study documents these (...)
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  54.  14
    Jennifer Meta Robinson and James Robert Farmer: Selling Local: Why Local Food Movements Matter.Emily Nink - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):159-160.
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  55.  12
    Collen Murphy, Paolo Gardoni and Robert McKim : Climate Change and its Impacts: Risks and Inequalities.Ionica Oncioiu - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):153-154.
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  56.  10
    Stephanie Paladino and Shirley J. Fiske : The Carbon Fix: Forest Carbon, Social Justice, and Environmental Governance.S. Suresh Ramanan - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):155-156.
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  57.  11
    Challenging the Urban–Rural Dichotomy in Agri-Food Systems.Rachel M. Shellabarger, Rachel C. Voss, Monika Egerer & Shun-Nan Chiang - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):91-103.
    The idea of a profound urban–rural divide has shaped analysis of the 2016 U.S. presidential election results. Here, through examples from agri-food systems, we consider the limitations of the urban–rural divide framework in light of the assumptions and intentions that underpin it. We explore the ideas and imaginaries that shape urban and rural categories, consider how material realities are and are not translated into U.S. rural development, farm, and nutrition policies, and examine the blending of rural and urban identities through (...)
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  58.  13
    The Importance of Food Retailers: Applying Network Analysis Techniques to the Study of Local Food Systems.Shawn A. Trivette - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):77-90.
    As local food activities expand and grow, an important question to answer is how various participants contribute to a local food system’s overall vitality and strength. This paper does so by focusing on the relationships between locally-oriented farm and retail actors and assessing what the configuration of these relationships tells us about the workings of the broader local food system. Such an analysis reveals two things. Empirically, it shows the important role food retailers play in the overall vibrancy of local (...)
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  59.  13
    Book Review: Steve Ventura and Martin Bailkey : Good Food, Strong Communities: Promoting Social Justice Through Local and Regional Food Systems. [REVIEW]Hannah T. Whitley - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):157-158.
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  60.  8
    Brandi Janssen: Making Local Food Work: The Challenges and Opportunities of Today’s Small Farmers.Simona Zollet - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):161-162.
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