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  1.  11
    Current Status and Future Challenges of Biobank Research in Malaysia.Latifah Amin, Angelina Olesen, Zurina Mahadi & Maznah Ibrahim - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (3):297-315.
    The establishment of MyCohort in 2005 showed that there is a growing interest on the part of the Malaysian government in the creation of biobanks in the country. This project can be considered as the biggest and most comprehensive cohort study in Malaysia, where hundreds of thousands of human samples are stored for epidemiological and biomedical research. However, little is known about the current issues or the situation related to biobank research in Malaysia. There are pressing issues that need answers (...)
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  2.  3
    Reciprocal Trust as an Ethical Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic.Hui Yun Chan - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (3):335-354.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has generated a range of responses from countries across the globe in managing and containing infections. Considerable research has highlighted the importance of trust in ethically and effectively managing infectious diseases in the population; however, considerations of reciprocal trust remain limited in debates on pandemic response. This paper aims to broaden the perspective of good ethical practices in managing an infectious disease outbreak by including the role of reciprocal trust. A synthesis of the approaches drawn from South (...)
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  3. Meeting the Publishing Needs of the Bioethics Community.Graeme T. Laurie - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (3):279-282.
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  4.  1
    Mitochondrial Replacement Techniques, the Non-Identity Problem, and Genetic Parenthood.William Simkulet - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (3):317-334.
    Mitochondrial replacement techniques are designed to allow couples to have children without passing on mitochondrial diseases. Recently, Giulia Cavaliere and César Palacios-González argued that prospective parents have the right to use MRTs to pursue genetic relatedness, such that some same-sex couples and/or polygamous triads could use the process to impart genetic relatedness between a child and more of its caregivers. Although MRTs carry medical risks, Cavaliere and Palacios-González contend that because MRTs are identity-affecting, they do not cause harm to an (...)
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  5.  8
    The Human Organ Transplantation Act in Bangladesh: Towards Proper Family-Based Ethics and Law.Md Sanwar Siraj - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (3):283-296.
    The Human Organ Transplantation Act came into officially force in Bangladesh on April 13, 1999, allowing organ donations from both living and brain-dead donors. The Act was amended by the Parliament on January 8, 2018, with the changes coming into effect shortly afterwards on January 28. The Act was revised to extend a living donor pool from close relatives to include certain other relatives such as grandparents, grandchildren, and first cousins. The Act was also revised to allow individuals to prioritize (...)
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  6.  1
    A Proposed Model of Core Competencies for Research Ethics Consultants.Tadao Takano, Hiroaki Yanagawa, Yusuke Inoue & Kenji Matsui - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (3):355-370.
    Research ethics consultation services, which function as an advisory service to facilitate the resolution of complex ethical issues in clinical research, have been proliferating over the last decade. However, the qualification of an individual who provides RECS, or “a research ethics consultant,” has not been thoroughly investigated, in contrast to healthcare ethics consultants, whose core competencies have been discussed and clarified to a great extent. In this study, we investigated core competencies necessary for research ethics consultants, referring to the core (...)
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  7.  2
    Is COVID-19 Immune to Misinformation? A Brief Overview.Sana Ali, Atiqa Khalid & Erum Zahid - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (2):255-277.
    During the current COVID-19 pandemic, misinformation is a major challenge, raising several social and psychological concerns. This article highlights the prevailing misinformation as an outbreak containing hoaxes, myths, and rumours. In comparison to traditional media, online media platforms facilitate misinformation even more widely. To further affirm this ethical concern, the researchers cite relevant studies demonstrating the role of new media in misinformation and its potential consequences. Besides other significant psychosocial impacts, such as xenophobia, psychological distress, LGBT rights violation, gender-based violence, (...)
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  8.  5
    CRISPR-Cas9 and He Jiankui's Case: An Islamic Bioethics Review Using Maqasid Al-Shari'a and Qawaid Fighiyyah.Nimah Alsomali & Ghaiath Hussein - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (2):149-165.
    The discovery of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and the CRISPR-mediated protein 9 (CRISPR-Cas9) immediately revealed numerous potential therapeutic applications. Although CRISPR-Cas9 will most likely be useful for addressing issues such as genetic diseases and related medical issues, use of this modality for germline modification generates complex ethical questions regarding the safety and efficacy, human genetic enhancement, and “designer” babies. In this article, the case of the He Jiankui affair is used as an example of the potential for (...)
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  9.  4
    Ethical Responses to the COVID-19 Pandemic—Lessons From Sri Lanka.Dineshani Hettiarachchi, Nafeesa Noordeen, Chanpika Gamakaranage, E. A. Rumesh Buddhika D. Somarathne & Saroj Jayasinghe - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (2):225-233.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has undoubtedly become an era-defining challenge for the entire world. It has implications not only in the public health sector but also in the global economy and political landscape. The prevention strategy that has been followed in Sri Lanka is unique. Early action taken by the government and the ministry of health, being one of pre-emptive quarantining and isolation of suspected contacts even before they developed symptoms, was vital to contain the spread of the disease. During the (...)
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  10.  5
    Ethics and Health Communication in English: Tackling the Consequences of Colonial Era Linguicism and Racism.Saroj Jayasinghe - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (2):245-253.
    Sri Lanka, once a colony of Britain, gained independence in 1948. However, especially the health sector continues to use English as its main medium of communication. Such language bias leads to marginalization of those less fluent in English, and hinders achieving a higher level of health literacy. Discrimination of people or social groups based on their language is termed linguicism. Tackling linguicism requires an understanding of its historic roots and an exploration of potential links to colonial racial prejudices. Published literature (...)
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  11.  1
    COVID-19 Pandemic, Transparency, and “Polidemic” in the Republic of Korea.Cheol Kang & Ilhak Lee - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (2):213-224.
    This article examines the development of the Republic of Korea’s strategy to prevent the spread of COVID-19 with particular focus on ethical issues and the problem of politicization of public communication. Using prominent examples of stakeholders who have acted and expressed themselves in highly contradictory ways on the topic of the pandemic, we provide an analysis of how the public health policy discourse has entered into the realm of politicization and elaborate on the danger that this phenomenon poses in terms (...)
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  12.  5
    Conception of Saviour Siblings: Ethical Perceptions of Selected Stakeholders in Malaysia.Chee Ying Kuek, Sharon Kaur A./P. Gurmukh Singh & Pek San Tay - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (2):167-178.
    The conception of saviour siblings using preimplantation genetic diagnosis coupled with human leukocyte antigen typing or HLA typing alone is controversial and receives a wide divergence of legal responses among countries around the world. The resulting child conceived through this procedure is dubbed a ‘saviour sibling’ as the child can potentially act as a compatible donor for an elder ailing sibling who needs a haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. At present, the acceptability of this procedure in Malaysia is ambiguous as there (...)
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  13.  3
    Conception, COVID, and Communication.Graeme T. Laurie - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (2):129-132.
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  14.  1
    The Possibility/Impossibility of Ethical Community During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Philosophical Reflection.Shining Star Lyngdoh - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (2):235-243.
    The outbreak of COVID-19 has raised a global concern and calls for an urgent response. During this perpetual time of epidemic crisis, philosophy has to stand on trial and provide a responsible justification for how it is still relevant and can be of used during this global crisis. In such a time of crisis like that of COVID-19, this paper offers a philosophical reflection from within the possibility/impossibility of community thinking in India, and the demand for an ethical responsivity and (...)
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  15.  2
    Technicization of “Birth” and “Mothering”: Bioethical Debates From Feminist Perspectives.Zairu Nisha - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (2):133-148.
    Birthing is a natural phenomenon. However, in the era of modernisation, it has dramatically changed and transformed into a technological affair. Some feminists claim that advances in medicine and assisted reproductive technologies have opened up numerous opportunities and choices for women to free themselves from their destined role of maternity by separating sex from reproduction. But are these technological artefacts always there to emancipate women or just another way to keep them subordinated to serve social needs? Other feminists argue that (...)
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  16.  2
    Perceptions of ‘Precision’ and ‘Personalised’ Medicine in Singapore and Associated Ethical Issues.Serene Ong, Jeffrey Ling, Angela Ballantyne, Tamra Lysaght & Vicki Xafis - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (2):179-194.
    Governments are investing in precision medicine with the aim of improving healthcare through the use of genomic analyses and data analytics to develop tailored treatment approaches for individual patients. The success of PM is contingent upon clear public communications that engender trust and secure the social licence to collect and share large population-wide data sets because specific consent for each data re-use is impractical. Variation in the terminology used by different programmes used to describe PM may hinder clear communication and (...)
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  17.  2
    Figuring India and China in the Constitution of Globally Stratified Sex Selection.Rajani Bhatia - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (1):23-37.
    The advent of techniques of sex selection that rely on assisted reproduction led to a questioning of whether sex selection should be deemed always and everywhere unethical. While China and India are normally associated with condemned practices, they are also implicated in processes that constitute globally stratified sex selection inclusive of its more valued form, often referred to as family balancing. Through an application of Ong and Collier’s concept of global assemblage, I demonstrate how family balancing, which has taken on (...)
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  18.  4
    ‘You Are Not Young Anymore!’: Gender, Age and the Politics of Reproduction in Post-Reform China.Xiaorong Gu - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (1):57-76.
    Based on in-depth interview data and popular culture texts, the current study has explored the politics of reproduction revolving around women’s age in contemporary China. Conceptualizing reproduction as a site of contestation and politics between different, and often contradictory, sets of discourses and power structures, I pursue a feminist and social constructivist analysis of the politics of reproduction in the lives of a group of urban professional women who are yet to enter motherhood at their late 20s and 30s. I (...)
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  19.  2
    The Gendered Biopolitics of Sex Selection in India.Ravinder Kaur & Taanya Kapoor - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (1):111-127.
    After China, India has the most skewed sex ratio at birth. These two Asian countries account for about 90 to 95% of the estimated 1.2 to 1.5 million missing female births annually, worldwide, due to gender-biased sex selection. To understand this extreme discrimination against girls, this article examines the gendered biopolitics embedded in population policies, new sex selection technologies, and in the social reproduction of patriarchal society. The ethical consequences of advanced reproductive technologies, which remove the moral turpitude around gender-based (...)
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  20.  2
    Ageing and Reproductive Decline in Assisted Reproductive Technologies in India: Mapping the ‘Management’ of Eggs and Wombs.Anindita Majumdar - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (1):39-55.
    In this paper, I discuss the ethical underpinnings to the anthropological analysis of age and reproductive decline in the ‘management’ of infertility, by suggesting that assisted reproductive technologies ‘use’ age and reproductive decline to further endanger women’s bodies by subjecting it to disaggregation into parts that do not belong to them anymore. Here, the category of age becomes a malleable concept to manipulate women seeking fertility management. In ethnographic findings from two Indian ART clinics, amongst women aged between 20 and (...)
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  21.  2
    Social Sciences, Bioethics, and the Question of Population.Anindita Majumdar, Paro Mishra & Ravinder Kaur - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (1):1-5.
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  22.  3
    Marriage, Health, and Old-Age Support: Risk to Rural Involuntary Bachelors’ Family Development in Contemporary China.Yang Meng, Bo Yang, Shuzhuo Li & Marcus W. Feldman - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (1):77-89.
    In the traditional system of Chinese families, individuals are embedded in the institution of the family with defined obligations to enhance family development. As a consequence of the male-biased sex ratio at birth in China since the 1980s, an increasing number of surplus rural males have been affected by a marriage squeeze becoming involuntary bachelors. Under China’s universal heterosexual marriage tradition, family development of rural involuntary bachelors has largely been ignored, but in China’s gender-imbalanced society, it is necessary to adopt (...)
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  23.  4
    Reproductive Technologies, Care Crisis and Inter-Generational Relations in North India: Towards a Local Ethics of Care.Paro Mishra - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (1):91-109.
    This paper reflects on the social consequences of biotechnological control of population for values and ethics of care within the family household in rural north India. Based on long-term ethnographic research, it illustrates the manner in which social practices intermingle with reproductive choices and new reproductive technologies, leading to a systematic elimination of female foetuses, and thus, imbalanced sex ratios. This technological fashioning of populations, the paper argues, has far-reaching consequences for the institutions of family, marriage and kinship in north (...)
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  24.  4
    Changing Fertility Landscapes: Exploring the Reproductive Routes and Choices of Fertility Patients From China for Assisted Reproduction in Russia.Christina Weis - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (1):7-22.
    Global reproductive landscapes and with them cross-border routes are rapidly changing. This paper examines the reproductive routes and choices of fertility travellers from China to Russia as reported by medical professionals and fertility service providers. Providing new empirical data, it raises new ethical questions on the facilitation of cross-border reproductive travel and the commercialisation of reproductive treatment. The relaxation of the one-child policy in 2014 in China, the increasing demand for ART exceeding the capacity of national fertility clinics and the (...)
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