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  1. Embedding Social Innovation: Shaping Societal Norms and Behaviors Throughout the Innovation Process.Daniel Arenas & Henrike Purtik - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (5):963-1002.
    New products and services that tackle grand societal challenges often require changes in societal norms, values, and expectations. This research investigates the question of how innovating actors shape these informal institutions throughout the innovation process by drawing on the literature on social innovation and institutional theory. In a comparison of four case studies, we observe that all innovating actors under study engage in a diverse set of practices to challenge and shape societal norms and expectations as well as user habits (...)
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  2.  4
    Social Movements as Catalysts for Corporate Social Innovation: Environmental Activism and the Adoption of Green Information Systems.Abhijit Chaudhury, David L. Levy, Pratyush Bharati & Edward J. Carberry - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (5):1083-1127.
    Although the literature on social innovation has focused primarily on social enterprises, social innovation has long occurred within mainstream corporations. Drawing upon recent scholarship on social movements and institutional complexity, we analyze how movements foster corporate social innovation. Our context is the adoption of green information systems, which are information systems employed to transform organizations and society into more sustainable entities. We trace the historical emergence of green IS as a corporate response to increasing demands for sustainability reporting, a key (...)
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  3.  5
    Breaking the Wall: Emotions and Projective Agency Under Extreme Poverty. [REVIEW]Pablo D. Fernández, Alberto Willi & Pablo Martin de Holan - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (5):919-962.
    In this inductive, exploratory study, we explore how emotions affect the agency of vulnerable persons and their engagement in social innovation to challenge oppressive institutional constraints. By presenting the in-depth case of a successful entrepreneur from a shantytown, we show how emotions affect the construction of a self that contributes to the reproduction of social order rather than change, and how effective interventions can break the cycle of poverty and hopelessness that is dominant among excluded people. We find that this (...)
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  4. From Balancing Missions to Mission Drift: The Role of the Institutional Context, Spaces, and Compartmentalization in the Scaling of Social Enterprises.Royston Greenwood, Johanna Winter, Thomas Gegenhuber & M. Paola Ometto - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (5):1003-1046.
    In this article, we explain the mechanisms that allow social enterprises to balance their missions, and the risk of mission drift as organizations grow. We empirically explore Incubator-BUS, a student organization within a private Brazilian university, which sought to incubate cooperatives for vulnerable groups. Although initially successful in balancing its missions, I-BUS then failed. We show how scaling-up can complicate the balancing of different missions within the same organization. We propose that, to balance their missions, social enterprises—especially recently formed and (...)
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  5. Conditioning a Professional Exchange Field for Social Innovation.Jo-Louise Huq - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (5):1047-1082.
    Social innovation is about solving important problems in new ways. In professional exchange fields, however, structuring and constraining forces make introducing new solutions exceedingly difficult, and known pathways that introduce new solutions are unlikely to be successful. In this article, I examine how social innovation can be encouraged in a professional exchange field. I identify three kinds of disrupting action that can be used to encourage social innovation. These actions interrupt and expand essential elements of professionals’ work and they condition (...)
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  6. Social Innovation: Integrating Micro, Meso, and Macro Level Insights From Institutional Theory.Ignasi Martí, Frank G. A. de Bakker, Silvia Dorado, Charlene Zietsma & Jakomijn van Wijk - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (5):887-918.
    Social innovations are urgently needed as we confront complex social problems. As these social problems feature substantial interdependencies among multiple systems and actors, developing and implementing innovative solutions involve the re-negotiating of settled institutions or the building of new ones. In this introductory article, we introduce a stylized three-cycle model highlighting the institutional nature of social innovation efforts. The model conceptualizes social innovation processes as the product of agentic, relational, and situated dynamics in three interrelated cycles that operate at the (...)
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  7.  1
    The Transferability of Financial Inclusion Models: A Process-Based Approach.Frédéric Lavoie, Tania Pereira Christopoulos & Marlei Pozzebon - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (4):841-882.
    Although a number of microfinance initiatives have improved financial inclusion in various regions of developing countries, the transferability of their foundations from one context to another is still a challenge. This study proposes an innovative process-based model targeting the initial stages of the transfer process that links three interconnected categories: local contextual conditions, transferring practices, and initial developmental consequences. The results were produced through a longitudinal study of the implementation of three community development banks on the periphery of Sao Paulo (...)
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  8.  2
    Patterns of Firm Responses to Different Types of Natural Disasters.Martina K. Linnenluecke & Brent McKnight - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (4):813-840.
    This article examines the relationships between disaster type and firms’ disaster responses. We draw on a unique dataset of 2,164 press releases related to the occurrence of 206 natural disasters over a 10-year period to analyze how firm responses are shaped by the type of disaster it faces. Firms play an increasingly important role in disaster response. We find that firms engage in more anticipatory responses when the type of disaster a firm faces exhibits even impact dispersion and high expected (...)
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  9.  2
    Moral Reasoning and Its Connections With Machiavellianism and Authoritarianism: The Critical Roles of Index Choice and Utilization.E. Sharon Mason & Peter E. Mudrack - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (4):779-812.
    Moral reasoning typically relates unexpectedly weakly with both Machiavellianism and authoritarianism. Although researchers often explain this by pointing to apparent shortcomings in both the construct and the measure of moral reasoning, such explanations are questionable given the many instances of support for hypotheses involving moral reasoning using the same construct and measure. As these latter cannot only sometimes be flawed, we explored the possible influence of moral reasoning index choice on observed results by using multiple indices available in the Defining (...)
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  10.  4
    Business News Framing of Corporate Social Responsibility in the United States and the United Kingdom: Insights From the Implicit and Explicit CSR Framework.Daniel Riffe & Tae Ho Lee - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (4):683-711.
    This study aims to contribute to the understanding of business news coverage of corporate social responsibility within a comparative international context by investigating two business newspapers, The Wall Street Journal from the United States and The Financial Times from the United Kingdom. Drawing on the news framing research and the implicit and explicit CSR framework of Matten and Moon, this content analysis shows that business news coverage of CSR in the United States and in the United Kingdom differs in terms (...)
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  11.  3
    Creating Community-Inclusive Organizations: Managerial Accountability Framework.Nava Subramaniam, Fara Azmat & Yuka Fujimoto - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (4):712-748.
    Based on a community psychology perspective, this qualitative study explores the community-inclusion effort of one of the largest pulp and paper companies in the world. Extending the literature on workforce diversity/inclusion, we present the community-inclusive organizational framework, which signifies the dynamics of community inclusiveness of organizations highlighting key managerial accountabilities based on the community psychology perspective. Theoretical and practical implications are presented for promoting community-inclusive organizations, along with avenues for further research.
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  12.  3
    Sensemaking in Military Critical Incidents: The Impact of Moral Intensity.Desiree E. M. Verweij, Dominique J. W. Meijer, Ellen Giebels & Miriam C. de Graaff - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (4):749-778.
    This study explores the relationship between moral intensity and the use of different sensemaking strategies in military critical incidents. First, narratives of military personnel were used to select prototypical high/low moral intensity critical incidents. In a follow-up, a scenario study was conducted with active duty military personnel to examine the relationship between moral intensity and the use of sensemaking tactics. This study offers three main conclusions. First, the use of sensemaking tactics is strongly tied to the level of moral intensity (...)
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  13.  4
    You Scratch My Back and I Scratch Yours: Investigating Inter-Partner Legitimacy in Relationships Between Social Enterprises and Their Key Partners.Markus Göbel, Christiana Weber & Kathrin Weidner - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (3):493-532.
    Social enterprises, like almost all organizations, continuously strive for external legitimacy. To be perceived as externally legitimated by society, social enterprises often engage in strategic partnerships. However, scholars have only recently turned their attention to the legitimating function of such partnerships. The purpose of this article is to address the hitherto neglected construct of inter-partner legitimacy. Drawing on institutional theory, we hypothesize that such inter-partner legitimacy affects the resource transfer among partners, which will, in turn, be recognized by society and (...)
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  14. Corporate Social Responsibility and Cost Stickiness.Mostafa Monzur Hasan & Ahsan Habib - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (3):453-492.
    This article examines the effects on cost stickiness of firms’ involvement in corporate social responsibility activities. Cost stickiness represents asymmetric cost behavior whereby the magnitude of cost increases in response to an increase in the activity level is greater than the magnitude of cost decreases with a decrease in the activity level. We hypothesize that CSR involvement requires ongoing investments in value-creating activities; hence, it is difficult to scale down committed resources instantly even when the activity declines. We use two (...)
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  15.  1
    Publishing Interdisciplinary Research in Business & Society.Bryan W. Husted, Irene Henriques, Andrew Crane & Frank de Bakker - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (3):443-452.
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  16.  3
    The Chief Political Officer: CEO Characteristics and Firm Investment in Corporate Political Activity.Andrew F. Johnson & Bruce C. Rudy - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (3):612-643.
    Research on corporate political activity has considered a number of antecedents to a firm’s engagement in politics. The majority of this research has focused on either industry or firm-level motivations that lead to corporate political activity, leaving the role of the firm’s leader noticeably absent in such scholarship. This article combines ideas from Upper Echelons Theory with research in corporate political activity to bridge this important gap. More specifically, this research utilizes CEO demographic characteristics to determine whether a firm will (...)
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  17.  3
    Government–Business Partnerships for Radical Eco-Innovation.Haiying Lin - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (3):533-573.
    This study assessed whether and how government–business partnerships offer a unique platform that targets profound environmental impacts via the promotion of radical eco-innovation. It applied transactional cost and complementary logics to explain the rationale of GBP formation for radical eco-innovation, and further assessed the operation of GBPs from governance, learning, and rulemaking aspects. This study applied propensity score matching technique to empirically test these theoretical associations using 225 observations representing 166 U.S. firms’ participation in 192 environmental alliances between 1985 and (...)
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  18. Corporate Political Transparency.Murad A. Mithani - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (3):644-678.
    Corporations are facing a growing demand for the transparency of political contributions. In the United States, this demand has largely focused on the implementation of a mandatory disclosure law. It rests on the assumption that legal enforcement can make it easier to observe the ties between corporations and political parties. In this study, I challenge this assumption. I build my case by first developing a conceptual foundation of corporate political transparency. I argue that in the absence of economic benefits, legal (...)
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  19.  2
    Board Socio-Cognitive Decision-Making and Task Performance Under Heightened Expectations of Accountability.Andrew J. Ward, Marcus M. Butts, Ann Buchholtz & Jill A. Brown - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (3):574-611.
    This study examines how heightened expectations of board responsibility and accountability affect the socio-cognitive decision-making of boards and their collective task performance. Using data from the directors of 60 boards who served before and after the enactment of Sarbanes–Oxley, this study provides insight into the potential negative impact that this tightened accountability environment can have on a board’s task performance. Examining several socio-cognitive elements of board decision-making, board authority is found to have a positive main effect on board task performance, (...)
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  20.  6
    Organizational Transparency: Conceptualizations, Conditions, and Consequences.Mikkel Flyverbom & Oana Brindusa Albu - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (2):268-297.
    Transparency is an increasingly prominent area of research that offers valuable insights for organizational studies. However, conceptualizations of transparency are rarely subject to critical scrutiny and thus their relevance remains unclear. In most accounts, transparency is associated with the sharing of information and the perceived quality of the information shared. This narrow focus on information and quality, however, overlooks the dynamics of organizational transparency. To provide a more structured conceptualization of organizational transparency, this article unpacks the assumptions that shape the (...)
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  21.  5
    Managing Physical Impacts of Climate Change: An Attentional Perspective on Corporate Adaptation.Federica Gasbarro & Jonatan Pinkse - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (2):333-368.
    Based on a study of the oil and gas industry, this article examines how physical impacts of climate change become events that firms notice and interpret in a way that leads to an active response to adapt to these impacts. Theoretically, the study draws on the attention-based view to highlight the potential biases that might occur as a consequence of firms’ preconceptions as well as organizational structure and context. In the empirical analysis, the article derives a model that explains the (...)
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  22.  7
    Building Blocks for Alternative Four-Dimensional Pyramids of Corporate Social Responsibilities.Peter Gomez & Timo Meynhardt - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (2):404-438.
    Carroll shaped the corporate social responsibility discourse into a four-dimensional pyramid framework, which was later adapted to corporate citizenship and sustainability approaches. The four layers of the pyramid—structured from foundation to apex as economic, legal, ethical, and philanthropic responsibilities—drew considerable managerial attention. An important criticism of the economic foundation of the Carroll pyramid concerns the identification and ordering of the four dimensions, which are inadequately justified theoretically. The authors of this article propose an alternative approach that builds on the public (...)
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  23.  7
    Outcomes to Partners in Multi-Stakeholder Cross-Sector Partnerships: A Resource-Based View.Adriane MacDonald & Amelia Clarke - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (2):298-332.
    The prevalence and complexity of local sustainable development challenges require coordinated action from multiple actors in the business, public, and civil society sectors. Large multi-stakeholder partnerships that build capacity by developing and leveraging the diverse perspectives and resources of partner organizations are becoming an increasingly popular approach to addressing such challenges. Multi-stakeholder partnerships are designed to address and prioritize a social problem, so it can be challenging to define the value proposition to each specific partner. Using a resource-based view, this (...)
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  24.  3
    Contextualizing Individual Competencies for Managing the Corporate Social Responsibility Adaptation Process: The Apparent Influence of the Business Case Logic.Martin Mulder, Vincent Blok, Renate Wesselink & Eghe R. Osagie - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (2):369-403.
    Companies committed to corporate social responsibility should ensure that their managers possess the appropriate competencies to effectively manage the CSR adaptation process. The literature provides insights into the individual competencies these managers need but fails to prioritize them and adequately contextualize them in a manner that makes them meaningful in practice. In this study, we contextualized the competencies within the different job roles CSR managers have in the CSR adaptation process. We interviewed 28 CSR managers, followed by a survey to (...)
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  25.  3
    Decoupling Among CSR Policies, Programs, and Impacts: An Empirical Study.Hugo Smid & Johan Graafland - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (2):231-267.
    There are relatively few empirical studies on the impacts of corporate social responsibility policies and programs. This article addresses the research gap by analyzing the incidence of, and the conditions that affect, decoupling among CSR policies, implementation of CSR programs, and CSR impacts for various environmental and social issues. Complete decoupling is a condition of full divergence among policies, programs, and impacts amounting to purely ceremonial CSR. Using ratings from a sustainability rating agency on a sample of about 1,000 large (...)
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  26.  4
    The Business Case for Corporate Social Responsibility: A Critique and an Indirect Path Forward.Michael L. Barnett - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (1):167-190.
    Do firms benefit from their voluntary efforts to alleviate the many problems confronting society? A vast literature establishing a “business case” for corporate social responsibility appears to find that usually they do. However, as argued herein, the business case literature has established only that firms usually benefit from responding to the demands of their primary stakeholders. The nature of the relationship between the interests of business and those of broader society, beyond a subset of powerful primary stakeholders, remains an open (...)
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  27.  7
    Sustainability Reporting in the Mining Sector: Exploring Its Symbolic Nature.Julieta Godfrid, Diego I. Murguía & Kathrin Böhling - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (1):191-225.
    Sustainability reporting has become a well-entrenched practice in the mining sector. Failure to adequately live up to societal expectations is now considered a significant threat to the viability of the industry. There is general agreement that broad endorsement of standards for nonfinancial disclosure supports mining companies to improve their image, while conflicts persist. Because sustainability reports “speak” on behalf of sustainably operating organizations and may create socio-political effects, we explore the symbolic nature of SR. We conceive of SR as a (...)
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  28.  18
    The Governance of Digital Technology, Big Data, and the Internet: New Roles and Responsibilities for Business.Dirk Matten, Ronald Deibert & Mikkel Flyverbom - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (1):3-19.
    The importance of digital technologies for social and economic developments and a growing focus on data collection and privacy concerns have made the Internet a salient and visible issue in global politics. Recent developments have increased the awareness that the current approach of governments and business to the governance of the Internet and the adjacent technological spaces raises a host of ethical issues. The significance and challenges of the digital age have been further accentuated by a string of highly exposed (...)
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  29.  7
    Public Trust in Business and Its Determinants.Bidhan Parmar, Kirsten Martin & Michael Pirson - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (1):132-166.
    Public trust in business, defined as the degree to which the public—meaning society at large—trusts business in general, is largely understudied. This article suggests four domains of existing trust research from which scholars of public trust in business can draw. The authors then propose four main hypotheses, which aim to predict the determinants of public trust, and test these hypotheses using a factorial vignette methodology. These results will provide scholars with more direction as this article is, to the authors’ knowledge, (...)
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  30.  1
    The Effectiveness of Voluntarily Produced Transparency Reports.Christopher Parsons - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (1):103-131.
    This article analyzes the relative effectiveness and limitations of companies’ voluntarily produced transparency reports in promoting change in firm and government behavior. Such reports are published by telecommunications companies and disclose how often and on what grounds government agencies compel customer data from these companies. These reports expose corporate behaviors while lifting the veil of governmental secrecy surrounding these kinds of compulsions. Fung, Graham, and Weil’s “targeted transparency” model is used to evaluate the extent to which these reports affect behavior. (...)
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  31.  6
    The “Right to Be Forgotten”: Negotiating Public and Private Ordering in the European Union.Roxana Radu & Jean-Marie Chenou - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (1):74-102.
    Although the Internet is frequently referred to as a global public resource, its functioning remains predominantly controlled by private actors. The Internet brought about significant shifts in the way we conceptualize governance. In particular, the handling of “big data” by private intermediaries has a direct impact on routine practices and personal lives. The implementation of the “right to be forgotten” following the May 2014 decision of the Court of Justice of the European Union against Google blurs the boundaries between the (...)
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  32.  8
    Data Capitalism: Redefining the Logics of Surveillance and Privacy.Sarah Myers West - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (1):20-41.
    This article provides a history of private sector tracking technologies, examining how the advent of commercial surveillance centered around a logic of data capitalism. Data capitalism is a system in which the commoditization of our data enables an asymmetric redistribution of power that is weighted toward the actors who have access and the capability to make sense of information. It is enacted through capitalism and justified by the association of networked technologies with the political and social benefits of online community, (...)
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  33.  4
    Born Political: A Dispositive Analysis of Google and Copyright.Glen Whelan - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (1):42-73.
    Google is a complex and complicated political beast with a significant, and often confusing, interest, in copyright matters. On one hand, for example, Google is widely accused of profiting from piracy. On the other, Google routinely complies with what is rapidly approaching a billion copyright takedown requests annually. In the present article, Foucault, neo-Gramscians, and Deleuze and Guattari are utilized to help construct a 32 dispositive analysis framework that overlaps three dispositive modalities and perspectives. In applying the framework to the (...)
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