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  1. Investigating the Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) on Risk Management Practices.Loren Falkenberg, Xiaoyu Liu & Hao Lu - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (2):496-534.
    To date, the value of corporate social responsibility activities has primarily been measured through the company’s reputation, with little attention given to exploring whether there are internal influences between CSR and other management practices. We argue that the efficacy of CSR extends beyond a company’s reputation for managing social and environmental concerns; in particular, it can influence other business practices such as risk management. Our results suggest that overall, firms with better CSR performance are more likely to adopt integrated risk (...)
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  2. Exploring the Relationship of Variant Degrees of National Economic Freedom to the Ethical Profiles of Millennial Business Students in Eight Countries.Jessica McManus Warnell & James Weber - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (2):457-495.
    This research explores the relationship of variant degrees of a country’s economic freedom to the ethical profiles of millennial business students, specifically an individual’s personal value orientation and post-conventional reasoning. Grounded in Social Identity, Personal Values, and Cognitive Moral Development theories, we construct an ethical profile to compare responses provided by millennial business students from eight countries. Our results suggest that a country’s degree of economic freedom has some association with an individual’s ethical profile, yet we also discuss other national (...)
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  3. Managing Competing Demands: Coping With the Inclusiveness–Efficiency Paradox in Cross-Sector Partnerships.Guido Möllering, Andreas Rasche & Leona A. Henry - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (2):267-304.
    This article discusses how cross-sector partnerships for sustainability manage the paradoxical tension between stakeholder inclusiveness and administrative efficiency. Drawing on qualitative data from a case study of a CSP focused on urban sustainability, we show how the inclusiveness–efficiency paradox unfolded throughout the studied collaboration. We discuss how the paradox reemerged in a different guise within each phase of the partnership and how three practices of paradox management helped actors to cope with the tension: “customized inviting”, “sequential including”, and “tailored instructing”. (...)
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  4. Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) Tweets: Do Shareholders Care?Bouchra M’Zali, Jean-Yves Filbien & Marion Dupire - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (2):419-456.
    We study how messages on Twitter by large non-governmental organizations, targeting companies from the S&P500, affect these companies’ stock prices. With a sample of 1,611 tweets between 2009 and 2017 by 18 large NGOs, we observe significant changes in the stock prices of the targeted firms. More specifically, NGO tweets stating a positive message about the environmental, social, or governance. Actions of the firm have a positive effect on stock prices, while negative tweets have a negative effect. Nevertheless, we find (...)
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  5. Mixed-Ownership Reform and Private Firms’ Corporate Social Responsibility Practices: Evidence From China.Ailing Pan, Xin Liu, Ron P. McIver, Lei Xu & Bin Li - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (2):389-418.
    China’s historical mixed-ownership reform has prioritized enhancing the efficiency and financial performance of its large state-owned enterprises through introduction of partial private-sector equity ownership. However, the presence of a significant gap between China’s private enterprises’ corporate social responsibility practices and those of its SOEs suggests potential for Reform-related ownership changes to negatively impact economy-wide CSR performance. We therefore examine the Reform’s impact on private acquirer firms’ CSR practices. We use a proprietary data set of firms listed on the Shanghai and (...)
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  6. Caste-Based Discrimination, Microfinance Credit Scores, and Microfinance Loan Approvals Among Females in India.Vinit Parida, Sambit Lenka & Pankaj C. Patel - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (2):372-388.
    We draw on the phenomenon of caste-based discrimination in India and signaling theory to assess whether microfinance credit scores improve the odds of female micropreneurs from a lower caste receiving loans and whether visible business characteristics further improve the odds of receiving microfinance loans. In a sample of 3,144 female microfinance loan applicants at a female-focused microloan enterprise in India, females from a lower caste, relative to those from a higher caste, have lower odds of receiving loans when their credit (...)
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  7. Business and Society Research Drawing on Institutionalism: Integrating Normative and Descriptive Research on Values.David Risi - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (2):305-339.
    Business and society scholarship that uses the theoretical perspective of institutionalism combines different research approaches to values. Within the B&S literature drawing on institutionalism, we identified and categorized the research on values according to a spectrum of normative and/or descriptive approaches. Primarily, we focused on how the normative and descriptive approaches interrelate and integrate. We argue that drawing on John Dewey’s pragmatism and Philip Selznick’s institutionalism can help further an integrative approach, which holds great potential for advancing theorization in the (...)
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  8. Toward a Professions-Based Understanding of Ethical and Responsible Lobbying.Lila Skountridaki & Andrew Barron - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (2):340-371.
    Responding to calls for more substantive studies into ethical and responsible lobbying, we analyze data collected over a 5-year period in Brussels to explore how individual lobbyists understand the ethical dimensions of their work. Mobilizing insights from the sociology of the professions, we expose an emerging lobbying professionalism and unpack practitioners’ understandings of what being a professional lobbyist entails, focusing in particular on their espoused values of transparency and honesty. While expectations to lobby more transparently and honestly stem from political (...)
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  9. Executive Migration Matters: The Transfer of CSR Profiles Across Organizations.Eonsoo Kim, Jon Jungbien Moon & Bongsun Kim - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (1):155-190.
    This study investigates whether and how the corporate social responsibility profile of a company transfers to another company when an executive leaves a firm. We integrate upper echelon and institutional theories, and develop a novel measure of CSR profiles to explore this issue with a longitudinal data set of executive migrations over a 14-year period. We find that migrated executives assimilate elements of their old firms’ CSR profiles into their new firms, and this is true for both CSR and corporate (...)
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  10. How Corruption is Tolerated in the Greek Public Sector: Toward a Second-Order Theory of Normalization.Spyros Lioukas, Maria Boura, Stelios Zyglidopoulos & Peter Fleming - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (1):191-224.
    Secrecy and “social cocooning” are critical mechanisms allowing the normalization of corruption within organizations. Less studied are processes of normalization that occur when corruption is an “open secret.” Drawing on an empirical study of Greek public-sector organizations, we suggest that a second-order normalization process ensues among non-corrupt onlookers both inside and beyond the organization. What is normalized at this level is not corruption, but its tolerance, which we disaggregate into agent-focused tolerance and structure-focused tolerance. Emphasizing the importance of non-corrupt bystanders, (...)
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  11. Examining the Conflicting Consequences of CEO Public Responses to Social Activist Challenges.François Neville - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (1):45-80.
    While the notion that CEOs have a general influence over their firms’ stakeholder strategies is well accepted, little attention has been given to how CEOs can actively and performatively manage social activism in and around their firms. I seek to develop an initial understanding of this phenomenon by examining some of the critical consequences of CEOs’ public responses to social activist challenges. Drawing on instrumental stakeholder theory and social movement theory, I recognize the dualistic nature of CEOs’ public responses to (...)
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  12. Why Do Institutions Revert? Institutional Elasticity and Petroleum Sector Reforms in India.Abhoy K. Ojha, K. V. Gopakumar & Kshitij Awasthi - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (1):81-116.
    The institutional change literature has predominantly focused on successful changes and sparsely on failed changes, but the idea of institutional fields reverting to their pre-change or near pre-change state, after change attempts, remains underexplored. Although recent studies have explored similar phenomenon from the perspective of actors resisting change and trying to restore status quo, a field-level understanding of the processes and the dynamics associated with it remains underexamined. The present study, using the case of reforms in the field of petroleum (...)
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    How Social Ventures Grow: Understanding the Role of Philanthropic Grants in Scaling Social Entrepreneurship.Jacob Park & Saurabh A. Lall - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (1):3-44.
    Although early-stage finance is critical to the growth of most ventures, it is even more important for social ventures as they face the challenges of balancing their social and commercial objectives. Drawing on institutional logics and signaling theory, this study uses a panel data set of 3,401 nascent social ventures to investigate the important role philanthropic grant funding plays in the organizational and financial development of social ventures. We find mixed results, with positive effects on employment and subsequent access to (...)
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    How Does the Stock Market Value Female Directors? International Evidence.Hendrik Rupertus & Thomas R. Loy - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (1):117-154.
    We analyze investors’ perception and long-term effects of board gender diversity on firms’ stock market performance in an international setting. Our results, controlling for the endogenous nature of board compositions, indicate that female board representation neither improves nor reduces firms’ long-term stock performance. Hence, we argue that it is imperative to go beyond the conventional thinking in terms of the business case for gender diversity and broaden the perspective also to incorporate societal and ethical aspects in the strive to board (...)
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  15. Community Influential Directors and Corporate Social Performance.Dusya Vera, Seemantini Pathak, Ashley Salaiz & Klavdia Evans - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (1):225-263.
    We draw upon the attention-based view of the firm to identify the conditions under which community influentials on a board impact a firm’s corporate social performance. We test our hypotheses with a panel data set of Fortune 500 firms from 2004 to 2008, including 3,955 unique firm–director combinations. Although CIs are often considered less powerful directors, we identify that when the firm is experiencing poor CSP, CIs have a positive effect on CSP. The ability of CIs to influence CSP is (...)
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