Year:

  1.  6
    Being Responsible: How Managers Aim to Implement Corporate Social Responsibility.Anne Galander, Simon Oertel & Michael Hunoldt - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (7):1441-1482.
    Focusing on the corporate social responsibility implementation process, we analyze how institutional complexity that arises from tensions between social and environmental elements and economic and technical concerns is managed by CSR managers. We further question how these micro-level processes interact with organizational-level processes over time. Our research is a 24-month qualitative process study in which we followed CSR managers. The study’s results allow us to distinguish between four strategies that CSR managers use to promote CSR implementation and to cope with (...)
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  2.  9
    Cross-Sector Partnerships as Capitalism’s New Development Agents: Reconceiving Impact as Empowerment.Thilde Langevang, Mette Morsing, Luisa Murphy & Anne Vestergaard - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (7):1339-1376.
    Cross-sector partnerships are currently praised as capitalism’s key governance instrument to address development challenges. Although some concern has been raised about the effectiveness of such partnerships, little is known about their actual impact. Often it is assumed that partnership outputs transform straightforwardly into societal impact such as poverty alleviation. This article problematizes this assumption. Employing a critical micro-level study, which draws on a qualitative case study of a nongovernmental organization –business partnership in Ghana, we examine how outputs provided by a (...)
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  3.  1
    The Partial Organization of Networked Corruption.Carl Rhodes, Su-Dol Kang & Kyoung-Hee Yu - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (7):1377-1409.
    This article uses the concept of partial organization to examine how organizing principles can facilitate the effective operation of networked forms of corruption. We analyze the case study of a corruption network in the South Korean maritime industry in terms of how it operated by selectively appropriating practices normally associated with formal bureaucratic organizations. Our findings show that organizational elements built into the corruption network enabled coordination of corruption activities and served to distort and override practices within member organizations. The (...)
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  4.  1
    Time and Business Sustainability: Socially Responsible Investing in Swiss Banks and Insurance Companies.David Risi - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (7):1410-1440.
    Business sustainability aims to combine market logic with social welfare logic. In literature, it is commonly assumed that sustainability and the social welfare logic associated with it are characterized by a long-term orientation. However, this assumption is problematic because this principle may not apply in certain contexts. This qualitative study challenges this assumption and focuses on the mechanisms by which time affects the adoption of sustainability practices in the context of socially responsible investing practices in Swiss banks and insurance companies. (...)
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  5.  1
    The Impact of Cause Portfolio Focus and Contribution Amount on Stakeholder Evaluations.Stefanie Robinson & Meike Eilert - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (7):1483-1514.
    When companies engage in corporate philanthropy, they can donate to a number of causes supporting a variety of issues, thus establishing cause portfolios. This research examines how the focus of a cause portfolio affects company evaluations. Results from an experiment show that when a company donates a small amount of money, consumers have lower evaluations of a company when the cause portfolio is focused versus diverse. This is because the focused portfolio is perceived to have a weaker impact to society. (...)
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  6.  3
    Bound to Fail? Exploring the Systemic Pathologies of CSR and Their Implications for CSR Research.Anselm Schneider - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (7):1303-1338.
    Among critics of corporate social responsibility, there is growing concern that CSR is largely ineffective as a corrective to the shortcomings of capitalism, namely, the negative effects of business on society and the undersupply of public goods. At the same time, researchers suggest that despite the shortcomings of CSR, it is possible to make it more effective in a stepwise manner. To explain the frequent failures of current CSR practices and to explore the possibilities of remedying them, I examine the (...)
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  7.  2
    The Elephant in the Room: The Nascent Research Agenda on Corporations, Social Responsibility, and Capitalism.Christopher Wickert, Laura J. Spence, Dirk Matten & Frank G. A. de Bakker - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (7):1295-1302.
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  8.  7
    A Complexity Theory Framework of Issue Movement.James R. Barker & Cedric E. Dawkins - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (6):1110-1150.
    This research draws on complexity theory to provide an alternative conceptualization of issue management. We use six dynamics of complexity drawn from complex adaptive systems—equipoise, turbulence, sensitive conditions, bifurcation, attractor emergence, and symmetry breaking—to develop a metaphorical framework that describes what occurs during various periods of issue activity and what propels issues from one period of activity to another. We illustrate the framework with a case study of the pharmaceutical industry response to the HIV/aids pandemic in Sub-Saharan Africa. The article (...)
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  9.  4
    When Is There a Sustainability Case for CSR? Pathways to Environmental and Social Performance Improvements.Mika Kuisma, Leena Lankoski, Jette Steen Knudsen, Jukka Rintamäki & Minna Halme - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (6):1181-1227.
    Little is known about when corporate social responsibility leads to a sustainability case. Building on various forms of decoupling, we develop a theoretical framework for examining pathways from institutional pressures through CSR management to sustainability performance. To empirically identify such pathways, we apply fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis to an extensive dataset from 19 large companies. We discover that different pathways are associated with environmental and social performance improvements, and that pathways to success and failure are for the most part not (...)
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  10.  2
    CSR Communication and Environmental Issue Networks in Virtual Space: A Cross-National Study.Wenlin Liu & Aimei Yang - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (6):1079-1109.
    Nowadays, a significant portion of corporate social responsibility communication takes place online. The current article attends to an essential, yet often overlooked element of online CSR communication: cross-sectoral hyperlink networks. The article argues that corporations build cross-sectoral hyperlink networks with nongovernmental organizations as a form of CSR communication to manage social issues. Using social network analysis, this article analyzes the hyperlink network data between 136 corporations and 94 international NGOs. Findings show that corporations’ cross-sectoral ties serve as a communication strategy (...)
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  11. The Just World Fallacy as a Challenge to the Business-As-Community Thesis.Matthew Sinnicks - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (6):1269-1292.
    The notion that business organizations are akin to Aristotelian political communities has been a central feature of research into virtue ethics in business. In this article, I begin by outlining this “community thesis” and go on to argue that psychological research into the “just world fallacy” presents it with a significant challenge. The just world fallacy undermines our ability to implement an Aristotelian conception of justice, to each as he or she is due, and imperils the relational equality required for (...)
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  12.  2
    Nation Branding as Sustainability Governance: A Comparative Case Analysis.Ville-Pekka Sorsa & Meri Frig - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (6):1151-1180.
    The role of governments in business and society research has remained underexplored, and recent studies have called for further investigations of mechanisms of government intervention. In response to this call, this article studies how nation branding communication can govern businesses toward sustainability by providing qualifications for sustainable business, legitimizing these qualifications, and attaching national aspirations to business conduct that meets these qualifications. A comparative exploratory analysis of the nation branding materials of Denmark and Finland shows that while the two nations (...)
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  13.  1
    Business and Society Research in Times of the Corona Crisis.Andrew Spicer, Kathleen Rehbein, Colin Higgins, Jill A. Brown, Frank G. A. de Bakker & Hari Bapuji - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (6):1067-1078.
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  14.  6
    Islamic Governance, National Governance, and Bank Risk Management and Disclosure in MENA Countries.Hussein A. Abdou, Collins G. Ntim & Ahmed A. Elamer - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (5):914-955.
    We examine the relationships among religious governance, especially Islamic governance quality, national governance quality, and risk management and disclosure practices, and consequently ascertain whether NGQ has a moderating influence on the IGQ–RDPs nexus. Using one of the largest data sets relating to Islamic banks from 10 Middle East and North Africa countries from 2006 to 2013, our findings are threefold. First, we find that RDPs are higher in banks with higher IGQ. Second, we find that RDPs are higher in banks (...)
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  15.  1
    The Potential for Plurality and Prevalence of the Religious Institutional Logic.Ali A. Gümüsay - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (5):855-880.
    Religion is a significant social force on organizational practice yet has been relatively underexamined in organization theory. In this article, I assert that the institutional logics perspective is especially conducive to examine the macrolevel role of religion for organizations. The notion of the religious logic offers conceptual means to explain the significance of religion, its interrelationship with other institutional orders, and embeddedness into and impact across interinstitutional systems. I argue for intrainstitutional logic plurality and show that specifically the intrareligious logic (...)
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  16.  5
    Religion as a Macro Social Force Affecting Business: Concepts, Questions, and Future Research.Raza Mir, Jawad Syed & Harry J. Van Buren - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (5):799-822.
    Religion has been in general neglected or even seen as a taboo subject in organizational research and management practice. This is a glaring omission in the business and society and business ethics literatures. As a source of moral norms and beliefs, religion has historically played a significant role in the vast majority of societies and continues to remain relevant in almost every society. More broadly, expectations for responsible business behavior are informed by regional, national, or indigenous cultures, which in many (...)
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  17.  1
    Religious Ethics: An Antidote for Religious Nationalism.Prabhir Vishnu Poruthiyil - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (5):1035-1061.
    Social movements driven by a combination of religious nationalism and economic fundamentalism are globally grabbing the levers of political, economic, and intellectual control. The consequence is a policy climate premised on polarization in which inequality and destruction of the natural environment are condoned. This creates demands on key academic institutions like business schools, with stakeholders who are complicit in the sustenance of these social movements. Scholars in these schools have an opportunity to respond through curricula that facilitate reflection on the (...)
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  18.  6
    Religion and CSR: An Islamic “Political” Model of Corporate Governance.Jan M. Smolarski & Maurice J. Murphy - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (5):823-854.
    This article examines the political perspective of corporate social responsibility from the standpoint of normative Islam. We argue that large firms within Muslim majority countries have the moral obligation to assist governments in addressing challenges related to sustainable socioeconomic development and in advancing human rights. In substantiating our argument, we draw upon the Islamic business ethics, stakeholder theory, and corporate governance literatures, as well as the concepts of Maqasid al Shariah and fard al ‘ayn versus fard al kifayah to introduce (...)
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  19.  4
    Examining the Link Between Religion and Corporate Governance: Insights From Nigeria.M. Karim Sorour, Philip J. Shrives & Franklin Nakpodia - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (5):956-994.
    This article examines whether the degree of religiosity in an institutional environment can stimulate the emergence of a robust corporate governance system. This study utilizes the Nigerian business environment as its context and embraces a qualitative interpretivist research approach. This approach permitted the engagement of a qualitative content analysis methodology to generate insights from interviewees. Findings from the study indicate that despite the high religiosity among Nigerians, religion has not stimulated the desired corporate governance system in Nigeria. The primary explanation (...)
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  20.  2
    Something Old, Something New: Continuity and Change at Business & Society.Andrew Spicer, Kathleen Rehbein, Colin Higgins, Frank G. A. de Bakker, Jill A. Brown & Hari Bapuji - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (5):791-798.
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  21.  1
    How Minority Religion Can Shape Corporate Capitalism: An Emergentist Account and Empirical Illustration.Brandon Vaidyanathan - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (5):881-913.
    Theories of how religion shapes business tend to focus on dominant religious institutions. What happens in the case of minority religions, where the alignment of religion with other dominant institutions may be weak at best? To answer this question, I first develop an emergentist account of religion, explaining how macro-level conditioning shapes meso- and micro-level interactions in religious contexts, leading to either structural change or stasis in business contexts. I illustrate this account by examining how Roman Catholicism as a minority (...)
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  22.  3
    Impact of Religion-Based Caste System on the Dynamics of Indian Trade Unions: Evidence From Two State-Owned Organizations in North India.Biju Varkkey & Jatin Pandey - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (5):995-1034.
    Religion and its envisaged structures have both macro- and micro-level implications for business. Of the many stratification schemas prevalent in India, two macro-social stratification schemas are important at the workplace: caste, which has been an age-old, religion-mandated, closed social stratification prevalent in Hinduism that had led to inequality in the society, and trade union, which is a relatively new and optional open workplace stratification that empowers workers and fosters equality. This study tries to decipher whether these two structures influence each (...)
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  23.  3
    Individual Values and SME Environmental Engagement.Richard Blundel, Sarah Williams & Anja Schaefer - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (4):642-675.
    We study the values on which managers of small and medium-sized enterprises draw when constructing their personal and organizational-level engagement with environmental issues, particularly climate change. Values play an important mediating role in business environmental engagement, but relatively little research has been conducted on individual values in smaller organizations. Using the Schwartz Value System as a framework for a qualitative analysis, we identify four “ideal-types” of SME managers and provide rich descriptions of the ways in which values shape their constructions (...)
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  24.  4
    Nonconformance With Regulatory Codes in the Nonprofit Sector: Accountability and the Discursive Coupling of Means and Ends.Tracey Coule & Penny Dick - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (4):749-786.
    Means–ends decoupling has recently been suggested as one consequence of the problems organizations face in trying to comply with institutional rules in contexts of institutional complexity. Such decoupling is characterized by the adoption, implementation, and scrutiny of particular codes of practice, which tend not to deliver the outcomes they were developed to produce. Recent scholarship focusing on this issue has suggested that such decoupling is a consequence of the trade-off organizations need to make between compliance and goal achievement, most especially (...)
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  25.  3
    Is Insider Control Good for Environmental Performance? Evidence From Dual-Class Firms.Jason Howell, Tricia D. Olsen & Paul Seaborn - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (4):716-748.
    Corporate environmental performance has become a key focus of business leaders, policy makers, and scholars alike. Today, scholarship on environmental practice increasingly highlights how various aspects of corporate governance can influence environmental performance. However, the prior literature is inconclusive as to whether ownership by insiders will have positive or negative environmental effects and whether insider voting control or equity control is more salient to environmental outcomes. This article leverages a unique empirical data set of dual-class firms, where insiders have voting (...)
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  26.  3
    Theorizing Business and Local Peacebuilding Through the “Footprints of Peace” Coffee Project in Rural Colombia.Juan Pablo Medina Bickel & Jason Miklian - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (4):676-715.
    Despite emerging study of business initiatives that attempt to support local peace and development, we still have significant knowledge gaps on their effectiveness and efficiency. This article builds theory on business engagements for peace through exploration of the Footprints for Peace peacebuilding project by the Federación Nacional de Cafeteros de Colombia. FOP was a business-peace initiative that attempted to improve the lives of vulnerable populations in conflict-affected regions. Through 70 stakeholder interviews, we show how FOP operationalized local peace and development (...)
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  27.  11
    Corporate Politics in the Public Sphere: Corporate Citizenspeak in a Mass Media Policy Contest.John Murray & Daniel Nyberg - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (4):579-611.
    This article connects the previously isolated literatures on corporate citizenship and corporate political activity to explain how firms construct political influence in the public sphere. The public engagement of firms as political actors is explored empirically through a discursive analysis of a public debate between the mining industry and the Australian government over a proposed tax. The findings show how the mining industry acted as a corporate citizen concerned about the common good. This, in turn, legitimized corporate political activity, which (...)
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  28.  3
    The Strategic Management of Government Affairs in Brussels.Matia Vannoni & David Coen - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (4):612-641.
    This article explores the strategic management of government affairs in companies active in the EU. The article relies on a unique large-N dataset on the functioning and staffing of EU government affairs. The analysis shows that companies delegate government affairs functions to in-house managers with specific competences, who stay in office for long periods and who have an extensive knowledge of the core competences of the company, thanks to their educational background and work experience in the private sector. These findings (...)
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  29.  3
    How Do Individuals Judge Organizational Legitimacy? Effects of Attributed Motives and Credibility on Organizational Legitimacy.Rolf Brühl, Melanie Eichhorn & Johannes Jahn - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (3):545-576.
    This experimental study examines individuals’ legitimacy judgments. We develop a model that demonstrates the role of attributed motives and corporate credibility for the evaluation of organizational legitimacy and test this model with an experimental vignette study. Our results show that when a corporate activity creates benefits for the firm—in addition to social benefits—individuals attribute more extrinsic motives. Extrinsic motives are ascribed when a corporation is perceived as being driven by external rewards as opposed to an altruistic commitment to a social (...)
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  30.  2
    Nonmarket Signals: Investment in Corporate Political Activity and the Performance of Initial Public Offerings.Jason Cavich & Bruce C. Rudy - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (3):419-438.
    Research on firm initial public offering performance has primarily utilized an economics of information perspective, which assumes that publicly available information is incorporated into a stock’s price when it is issued. However, the valuation process associated with IPOs remains manifest with considerable uncertainty for the prospective investor. This study argues that corporate political activity undertaken prior to the firm’s IPO acts as a signal to investors, reducing the uncertainty the market places on the value of the firm’s equity. Utilizing a (...)
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  31.  5
    The Business-Led Globalization of CSR: Channels of Diffusion From the United States Into Venezuela and Britain, 1962-1981.Daniel Kinderman & Rami Kaplan - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (3):439-488.
    The global spread of corporate social responsibility practices is widely explained in institutional-isomorphic terms: Corporations worldwide adopt CSR in reaction to isomorphic pressures exerted on them by a pro-CSR global environment, including normative calls for CSR, activist targeting, civil regulation frameworks, and educational activities. By contrast, this article considers the proactive agency of corporations in CSR diffusion, which is informed by nonmarket strategies that seek to instrumentally reshape the political and social environment of corporations. Applying a “channels-of-diffusion” perspective, we show (...)
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  32.  6
    Examining the Contingency Value of Certification on Regulatory Burden in a Transitional Economy.Xiaohua Meng, Xuemei Xie, Guoyou Qi & Hailiang Zou - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (3):489-517.
    In transitional economies, the governing central authorities impose heavy regulatory burdens on firms, which results in great costs for business in terms of time, resources, and other constraints. However, quality assurance through decentralized institutions is rapidly becoming more prevalent. This study examines the contingent implications that such decentralized institutions have for centralized regulation by focusing on the relationship between international certifications and regulatory burdens. As two prominent features of the institutional environment in emerging economies, the threat of competition from the (...)
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  33.  2
    How Scandals Act as Catalysts of Fringe Stakeholders’ Contentious Actions Against Multinational Corporations.Bertrand Valiorgue, Thomas Roulet & Thibault Daudigeos - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (3):387-418.
    In this article, we build on the stakeholder-politics literature to investigate how corporate scandals transform political contexts and give impetus to the contentious movements of fringe stakeholders against multinational corporations. Based on Adut’s scandal theory, we flesh out three scandal-related processes that directly affect political-opportunity structures and the generation of social movements against MNCs: convergence of contention toward a single target, publicization of deviant practices, and contagion to other organizations. These processes reduce the obstacles to collective actions by fringe stakeholders (...)
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  34.  2
    Exploring Practitioners’ Meaning of “Ethics,” “Compliance,” and “Corporate Social Responsibility” Practices: A Communities of Practice Perspective.Angeli Weller - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (3):518-544.
    Companies seeking to effectively manage the ethical dimensions of their business have created formal and informal practices, including those with the labels “ethics and compliance” and “corporate social responsibility”. However, there is little research describing how practitioners who create and implement these practices understand their meaning and relationship. Leveraging a communities of practice theoretical perspective, this qualitative study proposes that these practices can be studied as artifacts of managerial learning. Thematic analysis of interviews with senior managers suggests that practices have (...)
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  35.  4
    Revisiting Who, When, and Why Stakeholders Matter: Trust and Stakeholder Connectedness.Bret Crane - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (2):263-286.
    With limited resources and attention, managers have sought ways to categorize and prioritize stakeholders. The underlying assumption is that some stakeholders matter more than others. However, in the information age, stakeholders are increasingly interconnected, where a firm’s actions toward one stakeholder are visible to others and can affect members of the stakeholder ecosystem. Actions by a firm toward any of its stakeholders can signal its trustworthiness and determine to what degree other stakeholders will assume vulnerability and engage in future exchange (...)
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  36.  3
    The Influence of External and Internal Stakeholder Pressures on the Implementation of Upstream Environmental Supply Chain Practices.Stephanie Graham - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (2):351-383.
    This study examines the independent and combined influences of internal and external antecedents to upstream environmental practices. Proactive environmental strategy is considered as an internal antecedent and competitive pressure as an external antecedent. Multiple hierarchical regression analysis is used to test the hypothesized relationships using data from a sample of 149 manufacturing companies located within the U.K. food industry. The results suggest that proactive strategy and competitive pressure exert both independent and combined influences on environmental supply chain practices. Proactive strategy (...)
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  37.  13
    Stakeholder Theory at the Crossroads.Jeffrey S. Harrison & Jay B. Barney - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (2):203-212.
    The stakeholder perspective has provided a rich forum for a variety of debates at the intersection of business and society. Scholars gathered for two consecutive years, first in North America, and then in Europe, to discuss the major issues surrounding what has come to be known as stakeholder theory, to attempt to find common ground, and to uncover areas in need of further inquiry. Those meetings led to a list of “tensions” and a call for papers for this special issue (...)
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  38.  6
    Reimagining Profits and Stakeholder Capital to Address Tensions Among Stakeholders.Jae Hwan Lee, J. Robert Mitchell, Ronald K. Mitchell & David Hatherly - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (2):322-350.
    In this article, we use ideas from stakeholder capital maintenance theory to address tensions in allocating firm profits between stockholders and other stakeholders. We utilize a mediative thought experiment to conceptualize how multiple stakeholder interests might better be served, such that genuine firm profits versus artificial firm profits may be identified and incentivized. We thereby examine how such accounting transfers can be envisioned as stakeholder capital to be maintained for the benefit of both the firm and the economy. We present (...)
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  39.  21
    Tensions in Stakeholder Theory.Rajendra Sisodia, Robert Phillips & R. Edward Freeman - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (2):213-231.
    A number of tensions have been suggested between stakeholder theory and strategic management. Following a brief review of the histories of stakeholder theory and mainstream SM, we argue that many of the tensions are more apparent than real, representing different narratives about stakeholder theory, SM, business, and ethics. Part of the difference in these two theoretical positions is due to the fact that they seek to solve different problems. However, we suggest how there are areas of overlap, and we argue (...)
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  40.  4
    When Do Powerful Stakeholders Give Managers the Latitude to Balance All Stakeholders’ Interests?Pushpika Vishwanathan & Flore M. Bridoux - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (2):232-262.
    Research in instrumental stakeholder theory often discusses the benefits of a stakeholder strategy that balances all stakeholders’ interests as if the firm’s managers were not constrained much in choosing a strategy. Yet, through their value appropriation behavior, stakeholders with high bargaining power can significantly constrain managers’ choices. Our objective is, therefore, to understand when powerful stakeholders give managers the latitude to balance all stakeholders’ interests, rather than forcing them to satisfy primarily their own interests. Building on enlightened self-interest and the (...)
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  41.  9
    Creating the World’s Deadliest Catch: The Process of Enrolling Stakeholders in an Uncertain Endeavor.Jennifer L. Woolley, Susan L. Young & Sharon A. Alvarez - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (2):287-321.
    There is growing interest in the processes by which entrepreneurial opportunities are cocreated between entrepreneurs and their stakeholders. The longitudinal case study of de novo firm Wakefield Seafoods seeks to understand the underlying dynamics of phenomena that play out over time as stakeholders emerge and their contributions become essential to the opportunity formation process. The king crab data show that under conditions of uncertainty, characterized by incomplete or missing knowledge, entrepreneurial processes of experimentation, failure, and learning were effective in forming (...)
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  42.  4
    Vicious and Virtuous Circles of Aspirational Talk: From Self-Persuasive to Agonistic CSR Rhetoric.Itziar Castelló, Michael Etter & Peter Winkler - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (1):98-128.
    Scholars are divided over the question of whether managerial aspirational talk that contradicts current business practices can contribute to corporate social responsibility. In this conceptual article, we explore the rhetorical dynamics of aspirational talk that either impede or foster CSR. We argue that self-persuasive CSR rhetoric, as one enactment of aspirational talk, can attract attention and scrutiny from organizational members. Continued adherence to this rhetoric, however, creates and perpetuates tensions that lead to a vicious circle of disengagement. A virtuous circle, (...)
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  43.  2
    A Communicative Constitutive Perspective on Corporate Social Responsibility: Ventriloquism, Undecidability, and Surprisability.François Cooren - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (1):175-197.
    Adopting a communication as constitutive of organization perspective on ethics and corporate social responsibility invites us to create the conditions of a dialogue, discussion, or debate between various stakeholders, who can then try to confront their respective positions on a given issue, and possibly come to a decision regarding how a situation should be evaluated and/or responded to. As shown in this article, getting human stakeholders to voice their concerns about a specific situation is a way not only to rationally (...)
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  44.  13
    Formative Perspectives on the Relation Between CSR Communication and CSR Practices: Pathways for Walking, Talking, and Talking.Andrew Crane, Mette Morsing & Dennis Schoeneborn - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (1):5-33.
    Within the burgeoning corporate social responsibility communication literature, the question of the relationship between CSR practices and CSR communication has been a central concern. Recently, we observe a growing interest in formative views on the relation between CSR communication and practices, that is, works which ascribe to communication a constitutive role in creating, maintaining, and transforming CSR practices. This article provides an overview of the heterogeneous landscape of formative views on CSR communication scholarship. More specifically, we distinguish between three variants (...)
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  45.  2
    Shared Responsibility for Societal Problems: The Role of Internal Activists in Reframing Corporate Responsibility.Verena Girschik - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (1):34-66.
    This article addresses intraorganizational pressures for organizational transformation toward more responsible business practices by exploring the role of internal activists. Building on the interactive framing perspective, I ask how internal activists develop a framing of their company’s responsibilities as they attempt to transform its business practices from the inside out. I explore this question in the context of a Danish pharmaceutical company’s responsibilities regarding the rising diabetes problem. Grounded in an inductive, interpretive analysis, I show how internal activists developed a (...)
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  46.  2
    Aspirational Talk in Strategy Texts: A Longitudinal Case Study of Strategic Episodes in Corporate Social Responsibility Communication.Visa Penttilä - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (1):67-97.
    This article examines the embeddedness of corporate social responsibility communications in strategic planning. By drawing on the idea that talk and texts about CSR are an essential part of responsibility practices, I study how CSR aspirations—responsibility-related organizational self-descriptions, goals, and ideals that the organization cannot yet live up to or that the organizational constituents deem necessary to maintain—are intertwined with strategy texts and strategic episodes. Conducting a qualitative case study on a series of biennial strategy processes over a 20-year period, (...)
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  47.  2
    Unpacking the Narrative Decontestation of CSR: Aspiration for Change or Defense of the Status Quo?Déborah Philippe & Aurélien Feix - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (1):129-174.
    Corporate social responsibility has repeatedly been described as an “essentially contested concept,” which means that its signification is subject to continuous struggle. We argue that the “CSR institution” is legitimized by narratives which “decontest” the underlying concept of CSR in a manner that safeguards the CSRI from calls for alternative institutional arrangements. Examining several such narratives from a structuralist perspective, we find them to be permeated with six recurrent ambiguities that we show to be reflective of three deep-set taboos: the (...)
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