Business and Society

ISSN: 0007-6503

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  1.  15
    Toward Humanistic Business Ethics.Simone de Colle, R. Edward Freeman & Andrew C. Wicks - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (3):542-571.
    We theorize that, in the current development of business ethics, there is a fruitful evolution that dissolves the dichotomy between the normative and behavioral research approaches developed, respectively, by philosophers and social scientists; this approach avoids many of the limitations originated by such distinction by reconnecting their two separate narratives. We call this emerging research model Humanistic Business Ethics (HBE) as it emphasizes the centrality of the human dimension of business and the importance of adopting a richer concept of humanity (...)
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  2.  4
    Navigating Academia’s Stressful Waters: Discussing the Power of Horizontal Linkages for Early-Career Researchers.Lucas Amaral Lauriano, Julia Grimm & Camilo Arciniegas Pradilla - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (3):496-501.
    Mental health issues are on the rise among early career researchers (ECRs), endangering the future of academia. Horizontal linkages among ECRs can play a role in building a reliable emotional support system. We offer four suggestions to overcome existing barriers and foster these linkages.
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  3.  6
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Directors’ and Officers’ Liability Risk: The Moderating Effect of Risk Environment and Growth Potential.Hao Lu, M. Martin Boyer & Anne Kleffner - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (3):668-711.
    Theoretical arguments regarding the effect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on firm liability risk are abundant; however, empirical evidence about this relationship is scarce. We investigate the relationship between CSR and the personal liability risk of a firm’s directors and officers. We argue that companies with better CSR performance represent a better underwriting risk for directors’ and officers’ (D&O) insurance providers and, therefore, have a lower cost of insurance. Our results show that firms with better CSR performance are more likely (...)
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  4.  6
    Clearing Opacity: Change Management via Leader Transparency in Native American Neotraditional Organizations.Andrew K. Schnackenberg, Maurice Harris, Jon Panamaroff, Colleen Reilly, Lekshmy Sankar & Sean Scally - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (3):502-541.
    Neotraditional organizations are those that exist to sustain indigenous cultures, practices, and institutions as they compete in modern markets. This study examines how a single mechanism, leader transparency, influences change outcomes in neotraditional organizations. We predict that leader transparency will enhance employee cognition- and affect-based trust toward leadership during times of change, thereby supporting relational dynamics within the organization that enable a smooth transition. We also predict that leader transparency will elevate employee acceptance of new technology during change, thereby enhancing (...)
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  5.  5
    Scaling Up Sustainability From an Operational Capability to a Dynamic Capability: The Case of Royal Bank of Scotland.Veselina Stoyanova & Stoyan P. Stoyanov - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (3):572-625.
    This article reports on a case-based, longitudinal study of the micro-foundations of business sustainability development in the Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) in the turbulent years between 2002 and 2012. The study proposes an emerging 3-i process model, mapping the role of bounded, shared, and embedded intentionality; operational, functional, and strategic integration; and constraining, accelerating, and stabilizing institutionality as they relate to the micro-foundations underpinning the development of corporate sustainability from an operational capability to as a dynamic capability as it (...)
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  6.  6
    Being Reassuring About the Past While Promising a Better Future: How Companies Frame Temporal Focus in Social Responsibility Reporting.Annamaria Tuan, Matteo Corciolani & Elisa Giuliani - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (3):626-667.
    How is time framed in corporate social responsibility (CSR) talk? The literature mostly fails to analyze how multiple CSR activities are framed from a temporal perspective. Moreover, those researchers who undertake temporal framing tend to overlook the role of home-country cultural characteristics. Using a mixed-method analysis of 2,720 CSR reports from developing country companies, we show that CSR talk is mostly framed in the future tense when firms communicate complex human rights issues such as slavery or child labor, while the (...)
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  7.  6
    Why I Hesitate to Have a Child: Eco-Anxiety and Reproduction Concerns.Onna Malou van den Broek - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (3):491-495.
    Eco-anxiety increasingly weighs on (young) people’s mental health and impacts their life choices. This commentary zooms in on socio-ecological reproductive concerns with the aim to provide room for collective doubts on this individual choice, and to normalize emotions of anxiety, fear, grief, guilt, and regret, among many others, because of it.
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  8.  7
    Political CSR and Populism: Toward an Information-Based Theory of Political CSR.Zena Al-Esia, Andrew Crane & Kostas Iatridis - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (2):373-408.
    Extant research on political corporate social responsibility (PCSR) has not yet addressed how the populist turn impacts PCSR theory and practice. This conceptual article analyzes how populism influences PCSR across a range of political environments. We draw on signaling and screening theories to develop a conceptual model that advances PCSR literature by proposing an information-centric approach. We highlight the necessity of high-quality information as an enabling condition for effective PCSR-related decision-making, and our model explains how the depreciation of information transparency (...)
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  9. How Not to Turn the Grand Challenges Literature Into a Tower of Babel?Guillaume Carton, Julia Parigot & Thomas Roulet - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (2):409-414.
    The Grand Challenges literature brings under its umbrella a wide variety of disjointed phenomena but runs the risk of reinventing the wheel as well as overlooking incremental progress and past work. To avert this, scholars need to (dis)connect (dis)similar issues, build on past research on these issues, and create opportunities for generalizability through theoretical examinations.
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  10.  1
    Do They Mind the Gap? The Role of Founders in Organizational Pay Dispersion.Myrto Chliova, Gabriella Cacciotti & Teemu Kautonen - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (2):415-451.
    This study adds to the emergent stream of work examining the micro-level antecedents of pay dispersion by focusing on how business founders’ personal characteristics influence pay dispersion in their organizations. We leverage stakeholder theory and the motivated information processing perspective to predict pathways between founders’ self- versus other-oriented motivations, their perceptions of employee and shareholder salience, and pay dispersion in their organizations. We test our hypotheses on data from a two-wave survey of founders. We find that a high level of (...)
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  11.  7
    Social-Market Hybridity in Social Ventures: Scale Development and Validation.Jiawei Sophia Fu - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (2):452-486.
    Growing research suggests social ventures (SVs) variably combine social and profit orientations in core organizational features, and this variation in hybridity leads to divergent organizational dynamics and outcomes. However, no comprehensive and precise measurement scale has emerged to capture the varying degrees of hybridity across SVs. To advance theory and empirical research, this study presents an instrument for assessing how organizational actors perceive the degree to which social and market logics are (a) compatible and (b) central to organizational functioning. An (...)
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  12.  4
    A Responsibility to Whom? Populism and Its Effects on Corporate Social Responsibility.Christopher A. Hartwell & Timothy M. Devinney - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (2):300-340.
    Although populism is an ideologically fluid political vehicle, it is not one that is intrinsically anti-business. Indeed, different varieties of populist parties may encourage business activity for utilitarian ends, but with their own ideas on what businesses should be doing. This reality implies that initiatives not related to national greatness or priorities as defined by the populist leadership may be viewed as redundant. Key among such initiatives would be corporate social responsibility (CSR). In a populist environment, it is possible that (...)
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  13.  3
    Navigating Populism: A Study of How German and Swedish Corporations Articulate the Refugee Situation in 2015–2016.Christian Garmann Johnsen, Ulf Larsson-Olaison, Lena Olasion & Florian Weber - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (2):341-372.
    To study how populist sentiments have increasingly influenced businesses in society, we examine how German and Swedish corporations addressed the refugee situation in their 2015 and 2016 annual reports. We find that corporations changed their communication once refugee migration became subjected to populist political sentiments, but that they did so without subscribing to those sentiments. Although populism is based on such sharp oppositions as welcoming refugees or closing borders, our analysis shows that corporations have found ways to communicate about the (...)
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  14.  4
    Social Challenges for Business in the Age of Populism.Dorottya Sallai, Glenn Morgan, Magnus Feldmann, Marcus Gomes & Andrew Spicer - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (2):279-299.
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  15.  18
    Who Do I Want to Be Now That I’m Here? Refugee Entrepreneurs, Identity, and Acculturation.Lisa Jones Christensen & Arielle Newman - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (1):242-275.
    This article focuses on a subset of refugees who engage in entrepreneurship shortly after relocating to a new host community; it explores identity-related antecedents and integration consequences of different entrepreneurship strategies in the new location. It draws from acculturation psychology and founder identity theory to argue that, post-arrival, new refugees consider (a) how to prioritize the identity associated with their former life and (b) the degree of connection they desire in the host community. For some, these preferences drive heterogeneous entrepreneurial (...)
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  16.  6
    From Reactionary to Revelatory: CSR Reporting in Response to the Global Refugee Crisis.Katherine R. Cooper & Rong Wang - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (1):185-212.
    Refugee concerns may be perceived as controversial or outside the business domain, yet some corporations publicly engage these issues in corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives. This article relies on institutional and constitutive approaches to CSR to explore why organizations might declare their engagement in refugee issues, and utilizes decoupling to explore the relationship between reported CSR policy and CSR activity. We utilize a mixed-method, content analysis approach to draw on Fortune Global 500 CSR reports between 2012 and 2019, a period (...)
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  17.  4
    Finding the “Sweet Spot”: The Politics of Alignment in Cross-Sector Partnerships for Refugees.S. E. Henriksen - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (1):145-184.
    Cross-sector partnerships (CSPs) between nonprofits and businesses are increasingly implemented in response to humanitarian crises. These partnerships are motivated by ideals of alignment as stakeholders strive to find the “sweet spot” between humanitarian and business interests. However, this article shows that the ideals of alignment differ from the actual practices of alignment in the CSPs, and sweet spots are not merely found but constructed in and through changing relations of power. Based on an ethnographic case study of partnerships between a (...)
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  18.  8
    “I’m Not a Refugee Girl, Call Me Bella”: Professional Refugee Women, Agency, Recognition, and Emancipation.Dimitria Groutsis, Jock Collins & Carol Reid - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (1):213-241.
    The notion of refugees as a viable source of labor to address skill shortages in the destination country’s labor market has rarely been the dominant discourse on refugee entrants. Bella’s1 lived experience as a professional woman who arrived as a Syrian conflict refugee to Australia in 2017 presents an outlier in refugee research and challenges conventional scholarly wisdom and public discourse. A combination of human capital, a purposeful use of networks, supported by her desire for recognition and a deep sense (...)
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  19.  2
    Conceptualizing, Theorizing, and Measuring the Contributions of Business to Refugee Crises.Iii Harry J. Van Buren, Charlotte Karam, Alexander Newman & Colin Higgins - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (1):3-17.
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  20.  4
    Institutional Hegemony of a Logic Within a Cross-Sector Partnership.Barbara Harsman - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (1):108-144.
    Although some scholars propagate cross-sector partnerships (CSPs) as a panacea for addressing the grand challenges of the 21st century, scholars also acknowledge that this type of collaboration faces significant barriers since the institutional logics of partners such as business, civil society, and government potentially have contradicting interests and future visions. This inductive longitudinal case study on integrating skilled migrants into the German labor market examines the institutional work by which CSP members, particularly government actors, deliberately rein in contradictory logics to (...)
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  21.  5
    Value Creation for Refugees by Social Partnerships: A Frames Perspective.Özgü Karakulak & Moira V. Faul - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (1):18-59.
    Refugee crises are one of the grand challenges of the 21st century. Despite the theoretical importance attached to value created for beneficiaries in the partnership literature, research tends to focus on internal processes and value created for partners and partnerships, leading to widespread calls to further specify the value created by partnerships for beneficiaries. Applying an analytical framework from the value creation and social impact literatures, we report on a study of multiple social partnerships of a nongovernmental organization in the (...)
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  22.  2
    Scorched Earth: Employers’ Breached Trust in Refugees’ Labor Market Integration.Katja Wehrle, Mari Kira, Ute-Christine Klehe & Guido Hertel - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (1):60-107.
    Employment is critical for refugees’ positive integration into a receiving country. Enabling employment requires cross-sector collaborations, that is, employers collaborating with different stakeholders such as refugees, local employees, other employers, unofficial/official supporters, and authorities. A vital element of cross-sector collaborations is trust, yet the complexity of cross-sector collaborations may challenge the formation and maintenance of trust. Following a theory elaboration approach, this qualitative study with 37 employers and 27 support workers in Germany explores how employers’ experiences in cross-sector collaborations on (...)
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