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  1.  3
    The Issue of Abortion in Contemporary Brazil: An Analysis of Feminist Litigation in the Supreme Court.Maria Ligia Ganacim Granado Rodrigues Elias - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (2):159-179.
    This article discusses the issue of abortion in the context of the dispute between progressive and neoconservative political forces in Brazil. The article analyses ADPF 442, a legal instrument known as a Motion of Noncompliance with a Fundamental Precept, which was lodged with the Supreme Court as part of a feminist litigation strategy in the country. The motion calls for the Supreme Court to decide on the constitutionality of the decriminalisation of abortion within the first 12 weeks of gestation. Methodologically, (...)
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  2.  5
    Correction To: Feminist Judgments Projects at the Intersection.Martha Gayoye, Mateenah Hunter, Ambreena Manji, Miriam Matinda, Sharifah Sekalala, Rachna Chaudhary, Laura Lammasniemi, Shreya Munoth, Devyani Prabhat, Jhuma Sen, Gillian Black, Sharon Cowan, Chloë Kennedy & Vanessa E. Munro - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (2):263-265.
    In the original publication of the article, errors in the production stages resulted in Vanessa Munro being listed as sole author.
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  3.  5
    Unveiling Complex Discrimination at the Court of Justice of the European Union: The Islamic Headscarf at Work.Ander Gutiérrez-Solana Journoud - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (2):205-230.
    The Court of Justice of the European Union has had the opportunity to address the sensitive matter of the wearing of the Islamic headscarf in the workplace in two preliminary rulings. The result of these decisions implies that the wearing of this veil at work is, in general, neither proscribed nor always justified as a legitimate expression of religious beliefs. However, the law studied and applied deals exclusively with discrimination in the workplace on religious grounds. Nonetheless, the Islamic headscarf is (...)
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  4.  5
    Senthorun Sunil Raj: Feeling Queer Jurisprudence: Injury, Intimacy, Identity.Kay Lalor - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (2):277-281.
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  5.  2
    Nadine El-Enany: (B)Ordering Britain: Law, Race, and Empire: Manchester, University of Manchester Press, 2020, ISBN 978 1 5261 4542 0. [REVIEW]Renisa Mawani - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (2):289-291.
  6.  2
    Punishing Mothers for Men’s Violence: Failure to Protect Legislation and the Criminalisation of Abused Women.Sarah Singh - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (2):181-204.
    This article explores the gender dynamics of ‘causing or allowing a child to die’, contrary to the Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act 2004, section 5. This offence was intended to allow for prosecution where a child had been killed and it was uncertain who had killed him/her, but also to allow for prosecution of non-violent defendants who failed to protect him/her. More women than men have been charged and convicted of this offence signifying a reversal of usual patterns of (...)
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  7.  1
    A Local Authority V JB [2020] EWCA Civ 735; [2019] EWCOP 39.Emnani Subhi - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (2):267-276.
    In Re JB, a local authority, concerned with the risk the respondent posed to vulnerable women, successfully appealed against an order made in the Court of Protection that declared JB, an autistic man with impaired cognition, possessed capacity to consent to sexual relations. In this recent decision, the Court of Appeal has arguably reset the last 15 years of jurisprudence concerning P’s capacity to make decisions in regard to sexual relations. Previous case law focused on P’s ability to consent to (...)
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  8.  3
    Women’s Rights Facing Hypermasculinist Leadership: Implementing the Women, Peace and Security Agenda Under a Populist-Nationalist Regime.Barbara K. Trojanowska - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (2):231-249.
    Populist-nationalist ideologies pose a threat to women’s rights. This article examines to what extent national institutionalisation of international frameworks promoting women’s rights can weather the misogynistic political climate accompanying the global rise of populist nationalism. The post-2016 situation in the Philippines offers a testing ground for this problem due to the co-existence of President Duterte’s hypermasculinist national leadership with a strong history of institutionalisation of the UN’s Women, Peace and Security agenda. Drawing from an analysis of WPS policy and institutions (...)
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  9.  6
    Lola Olufemi: Feminism, Interrupted: Disrupting Power.Felicity Adams - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (1):149-153.
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  10.  3
    Access to Justice and Institutional Regendering: The Case of the National Prosecution Bureau of Chile.Bárbara Barraza Uribe & María Isabel Salinas - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (1):1-21.
    In 2017, the National Prosecution Bureau of Chile created the Special Unit for Human Rights, Gender-Based Violence, and Sex Crimes, becoming a milestone for criminal prosecution policies as the first time a state institution in Chile used the term ‘gender-based violence’ explicitly in its title. There was no law in the country that addressed and sanctioned this behaviour—recognising it as a social phenomenon—at the time of the Unit's creation. What does the creation of this new Unit mean for access to (...)
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  11.  1
    Ngaire Naffine: Criminal Law and the Man Problem.Joanne Conaghan - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (1):155-158.
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  12.  5
    “Try Not to Be Embarrassed”: A Sex Positive Analysis of Nonconsensual Pornography Case Law.Alexa Dodge - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (1):23-41.
    Media, police, and educational responses to nonconsensual pornography have been critiqued for relying on sex negative beliefs that result in victims of this act being blamed and shamed for their own victimisation. In this article I analyse judicial discourse in nonconsensual pornography case law to assess the extent to which sex negativity is embedded in legal responses. I find that, while overt victim blaming and shaming is not present in the judicial discourse, subtle forms of sex negativity are expressed in (...)
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  13.  3
    Health Inequalities and Ethnic Vulnerabilities During COVID-19 in the UK: A Reflection on the PHE Reports.Clare Keys, Gowri Nanayakkara, Chisa Onyejekwe, Rajeeb Kumar Sah & Toni Wright - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (1):107-118.
    COVID-19 has uncovered the vulnerabilities, inequalities and fragility present within our social community which has exposed and exacerbated the pre-existing racial and socioeconomic inequalities that disproportionately affect health outcomes for Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic people. Such disparities are fuelled by complex socioeconomic health determinants and longstanding structural inequalities. This paper aims to explore the inequalities and vulnerabilities of BAME communities laid bare by the Public Health England reports published in June 2020, concluding with suggested strategies to address inequalities in (...)
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  14.  5
    The Sexual Politics of Anti-Trafficking Discourse.Prabha Kotiswaran - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (1):43-65.
    20 years since the negotiation of the Palermo Protocol on Trafficking in 2000, the anti-trafficking field has gone from an early, almost exclusive preoccupation with sex work to addressing extreme exploitation in a range of labour sectors. While this might suggest a reduced focus on the nature of the work performed and a greater focus on the conditions under which it is performed, in reality, anti-trafficking discourse remains in the grip of polarised positions on sex work even as the carceral (...)
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  15.  1
    Fathers, Childcare and COVID-19.Alice Margaria - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (1):133-144.
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  16.  9
    Can International Human Rights Law Smash the Patriarchy? A Review of ‘Patriarchy’ According to United Nations Treaty Bodies and Special Procedures.Cassandra Mudgway - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (1):67-105.
    This article interrogates whether and how the concept of ‘patriarchy’ is used by UN human rights treaty monitoring bodies and special procedures to interpret state obligations to respect and ensure women’s human rights. There are two key points that arise out of this study: first, that several treaty bodies and special procedures purposely and consistently use the concept of ‘patriarchy’ when discussing women’s human rights, and second, that although not all treaty bodies and special procedures have referred to the terms (...)
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  17.  3
    Erika Rackley and Rosemary Auchmuty (Eds.): Women’s Legal Landmarks: Celebrating the History of Women and Law in the UK and Ireland.Vanessa E. Munro - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (1):145-148.
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  18.  5
    Vaginal Examinations During Childbirth: Consent, Coercion and COVID-19.Anna Nelson - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (1):119-131.
    In this paper I assess the labour ward admission policies introduced by some National Health Service trusts during the COVID-19 pandemic, arguing that these intersected with other policies in a manner which may have coerced birthing people into consenting to vaginal examinations they might have otherwise refused. In order to fully understand the potential severity of these policies, I situate this critique in the historical and contemporary context of the problematic relationship between consent and vaginal examinations. Identifying the legal wrongs (...)
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