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  1.  2
    Rachel Killean, Eithne Dowds and Anne-Marie McAlinden (Eds): Sexual Violence on Trial: Local and Comparative Perspectives: London, Routledge, 2021, ISBN: 9780367404277.Joanne Conaghan - 2022 - Feminist Legal Studies 30 (3):379-382.
  2. Using Reflexivity as a Tool to Validate Feminist Research Based on Personal Trauma.Lisamarie Deblasio - 2022 - Feminist Legal Studies 30 (3):355-365.
    This essay explores social science researchers with ‘insider status’. This term describes a researcher who is a member of the population they are studying. The research in question involved a birth mother studying the impact of compulsory child adoption on birth mothers. Research that grows from traumatic experiences may involve a researcher revisiting painful memories through her interactions with participants. She may hold unconscious biases and preconceptions. If not exposed or addressed, this raises ethical implications and can negatively affect the (...)
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  3. Emily Grabham: Women, Precarious Work and Care: The Failure of Family-Friendly Rights: Bristol, Bristol University Press, 2021, ISBN: 978-1529218718.Ebru Demir - 2022 - Feminist Legal Studies 30 (3):383-385.
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  4.  1
    Poulami Roychowdhury: Capable Women, Incapable States: Negotiating Violence and Rights in India: Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2021, ISBN: 9780190881894.Tugce Ellialti-Kose - 2022 - Feminist Legal Studies 30 (3):367-370.
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  5.  1
    Russell Sandberg: Subversive Legal History: A Manifesto for the Future of Legal Education: Oxford and New York, Routledge, ISBN: 978036719129.Rachel Ferguson - 2022 - Feminist Legal Studies 30 (3):371-377.
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  6.  1
    Credibility, Trauma, and the Law: Domestic Violence-Based Asylum Claims in the United States.Christina Gerken - 2022 - Feminist Legal Studies 30 (3):255-280.
    In 2018, Attorney General Jeff Sessions, in Matter of A-B-, attempted to bar victims of non-state actors—such as intimate partners and local gangs—from obtaining asylum in the United States. This article focuses on domestic violence-based asylum claims that made it to the US Circuit Court of Appeals during the Trump administration and the first five months of the Biden administration. My interdisciplinary approach goes beyond analysing the effect that Matter of A-B- has had on the outcomes of cases and asks (...)
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  7.  1
    The Legal Dimensions of Women’s Employment in the Jordanian Private Sector: An Analysis of Family-Related Rights.Ghofran Hilal, Hadeel Al-Zu’bi & Thawab Hilal - 2022 - Feminist Legal Studies 30 (3):331-354.
    This paper seeks to explore why women’s participation in the Jordanian workforce remains comparatively low—despite an increase in the number of employed women across many countries and regions. Focusing on the Jordanian private sector, where the greatest disparities lie, we assess the conformity between the provisions that regulate family-related rights in the workplace within national labour law and international law. From this examination, we conclude that whilst law offers the potential for significant positive change in the Jordanian labour market, and (...)
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  8. Governing Through Ignorance: Swedish Authorities’ Treatment of Detained and Non-Deported Migrants During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Annika Lindberg, Anna Lundberg, Elisabet Rundqvist & Sofia Häythiö - 2022 - Feminist Legal Studies 30 (3):309-329.
    Tensions between migration enforcement and migrants’ health and rights have gained renewed urgency during the COVID-19 pandemic. This article critically analyses how the pandemic has affected detained and deportable people in Sweden. Building on an activist methodological approach and collaboration, based on a survey conducted inside Swedish detention centres during the pandemic and the authors’ research and activist engagement with migrants who are detained or legally stranded in Sweden, we argue that migration authorities’ inadequate measures to protect detained and deportable (...)
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  9. The Regulation, Reclamation, and Resistance of Queer Kinship in Contemporary India.Katyayani Sinha - 2022 - Feminist Legal Studies 30 (3):281-307.
    Since 2014, two legislative actions, the Transgender Persons Act 2019, and the Draft Trafficking in Persons Bill 2021, have been pivotal in re-inscribing the Indian state’s colonial policing of queer kinship networks. By criminalising relationalities outside the heteropatriarchal conjugal home, the sexual subaltern is exposed to the state’s mechanisms of rescue and rehabilitation. These developments have occurred alongside the constitutional recognition of privacy in K.S. Puttaswamy v. Union of India 10 SCC 1 and the decriminalisation of the anti-sodomy law in (...)
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  10.  2
    Rethinking Explicit Consent and Intimate Data: The Case of Menstruapps.Daniela Alaattinoğlu - 2022 - Feminist Legal Studies 30 (2):157-179.
    Period-tracking software applications or ‘menstruapps’ have witnessed a surge in popularity in recent years. At the same time, many of them are a part of the adtech industry, using business models that create revenue by selling users’ personal and intimate data. This exploratory article brings menstruapps into a feminist legal debate. It investigates the supranational European legal standards on intimate and sensitive data processing, particularly the General Data Protection Regulation. Scrutinising explicit consent according to GDPR Article 9, this paper, through (...)
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  11.  2
    Swethaa S. Ballakrishnen: Accidental Feminism: Gender Parity and Selective Mobility Among India’s Professional Elite.Davina Cooper - 2022 - Feminist Legal Studies 30 (2):251-254.
  12. Swethaa S. Ballakrishnen: Accidental Feminism: Gender Parity and Selective Mobility Among India’s Professional Elite: Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2021, ISBN: 9780691182537. [REVIEW]Davina Cooper - 2022 - Feminist Legal Studies 30 (2):251-254.
  13.  1
    Networked Struggles: Placards at Pakistan’s Aurat March.Daanika R. Kamal - 2022 - Feminist Legal Studies 30 (2):219-233.
    Aurat March [Women’s March] is an annual event organised in various cities across Pakistan to observe International Women’s Day. Since its inception in 2018, the March has been condemned by conservative religious and political segments of society for reasons relating to propriety. This commentary explores how placards predominantly form the object of censure in the movement’s backlash. By reflecting on discourses on mainstream and social media, I first assess the use of placards in constructing networks of feminist voices. I then (...)
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  14.  1
    Transgender EU Citizens and the Limited Form of Union Citizenship Available to Them.Serhii Lashyn - 2022 - Feminist Legal Studies 30 (2):201-218.
    This article argues that only a limited form of EU citizenship is available to transgender people. As the paper demonstrates, transgender Union citizens face numerous difficulties when they exercise their right to free movement, despite such movement being the core of Union citizenship. Rather, transgender individuals only have access to a considerably restricted form of EU citizenship which is guaranteed as part of their fundamental status conferred by EU Treaties. The article points out that the current approach of including transgender (...)
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  15.  3
    A History Without Women: The Emergence and Development of Subaltern Ideology and the ‘Land Question’ in Kenya.Agnes Meroka-Mutua - 2022 - Feminist Legal Studies 30 (2):181-200.
    Kenya’s land question concerns the distributional inequalities that were occasioned by colonial land policies, and which impact the country’s political stability. There are two main schools of thought that explore how the land question and attendant political issues may be resolved. These are the dominant and the subaltern. The dominant school of thought has largely informed Kenya’s land law system, but it has failed to effectively address issues around political stability. This has meant that subaltern ideology, which was historically ignored (...)
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  16.  2
    Reimagining Gender Through Equality Law: What Legal Thoughtways Do Religion and Disability Offer?Flora Renz & Davina Cooper - 2022 - Feminist Legal Studies 30 (2):129-155.
    British equality law protections for sex and gender reassignment have grown fraught as activists tussle over legal and social categories of gender, gender transitioning, and sex. This article considers the future of gender-related equality protections in relation to ‘decertification’—an imagined reform that would detach sex and gender from legal personhood. One criticism of decertification is that de-formalising gender membership would undermine equality law protections. This article explores how gender-based equality law could operate in conditions of decertification, drawing on legal thoughtways (...)
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  17.  6
    Artificial Wombs, Frozen Embryos, and Parenthood: Will Ectogenesis Redistribute Gendered Responsibility for Gestation?Claire Horn - 2022 - Feminist Legal Studies 30 (1):51-72.
    A growing body of scholarship argues that by disentangling gestation from the body, artificial wombs will alter the relationship between men, women, and fetuses such that reproduction is effectively ‘degendered’. Scholars have claimed that this purported ‘degendering’ of gestation will subsequently create greater equity between men and women. I argue that, contrary to the assumptions made in this literature, it is law, not biology, that acts as a primary barrier to the ‘degendering’ of gestation. With reference to contemporary case law (...)
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  18.  6
    Struggle for Recognition: Theorising Sexual/Gender Minorities as Rights-Holders in International Law.Po-Han Lee - 2022 - Feminist Legal Studies 30 (1):73-95.
    This article argues for the necessity of recognising the collective rights-holding status of ‘sexual and gender minorities’ by examining the limits of the discourse concerning sexual orientation and gender identity in international law. I consider both symbolic interactionism and queer theory, which are critical of the assumption that everyone subscribes to a gender and a sexual identity. The theorisation proposed here accounts for not only people who possess a relatively stable identity, but also people whose situations are not conclusively characterised (...)
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  19.  3
    Sylvia Tamale: Decolonization and Afro-Feminism.Emmah Khisa Senge Wabuke - 2022 - Feminist Legal Studies 30 (1):121-123.
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