24 found

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  1. Maternal Grandmothers’ Household Residency, Children’s Growth, and Body Composition Are Not Related in Urban Maya Families from Yucatan.Hugo Azcorra, Barry Bogin, Federico Dickinson & Maria Inês Varela-Silva - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (2):434-449.
    This study analyzes the influence of grandmothers’ household residency on the presence of low height-for-age and excessive fat, waist circumference, and sum of triceps and subscapular skinfolds in a sample of 247 6- to 8-year-old urban Maya children from Yucatan, Mexico. Between September 2011 and January 2014, we obtained anthropometric and body composition data from children and mothers, as well as socioeconomic characteristics of participants and households. Grandmothers’ place of residence was categorized as either in the same household as their (...)
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  2.  1
    Ethnic Markers and How to Find Them.Adrian Viliami Bell & Alina Paegle - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (2):470-481.
    Ethnic markers are a prominent organizing feature of human society when individuals engage in significant anonymous interactions. However, identifying markers in natural settings is nontrivial. Although ad hoc assignment of markers to groups is widely documented in the ethnographic literature, predicting the membership of individuals based on stylistic variation is less clear. We argue that a more systematic approach is required to satisfy the basic assumptions made in ethnic marker theory. To this end we introduce a three-step ethnographic method to (...)
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  3. Exploratory Analysis of the Relationship between Social Identification and Testosterone Reactivity to Vicarious Combat.Kathleen V. Casto, Zach L. Root, Shawn N. Geniole, Justin M. Carré & Mark W. Bruner - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (2):509-527.
    Testosterone fluctuates in response to competitive social interactions, with the direction of change typically depending on factors such as contest outcome. Watching a competition may be sufficient to activate T among fans and others who are invested in the outcome. This study explores the change in T associated with vicarious experiences of competition among combat sport athletes viewing a teammate win or lose and assesses how individual differences in social identification with one’s team relates to these patterns of T reactivity. (...)
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  4.  1
    “A Solidarity-Type World”: Need-Based Helping among Ranchers in the Southwestern United States.Lee Cronk, Diego Guevara Beltrán, Denise Laya Mercado & Athena Aktipis - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (2):482-508.
    To better understand risk management and mutual aid among American ranchers, we interviewed and mailed a survey to ranchers in Hidalgo County, New Mexico, and Cochise County, Arizona, focusing on two questions: When do ranchers expect repayment for the help they provide others? What determines ranchers’ degrees of involvement in networks of mutual aid, which they refer to as “neighboring”? When needs arise due to unpredictable events, such as injuries, most ranchers reported not expecting to be paid back for the (...)
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  5. Do Local Sex Ratios Approximate Subjective Partner Markets?Andreas Filser & Richard Preetz - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (2):406-433.
    Sex ratios have widely been recognized as an important link between demographic contexts and behavior because changes in the ratio shift sex-specific bargaining power in the partner market. Implicitly, the literature considers individual partner market experiences to be a function of local sex ratios. However, empirical evidence on the correspondence between subjective partner availability and local sex ratios is lacking so far. In this paper, we analyzed how closely a set of different local sex ratio measures correlates with subjective partner (...)
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  6.  6
    Correction to: Eyes, More Than Other Facial Features, Enhance Real-World Donation Behavior.Caroline Kelsey, Amrisha Vaish & Tobias Grossmann - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (2):528-528.
    In Fig. 2 of the aforementioned article the mean value of the “chair” condition is incorrectly displayed as 0.011 when it should be 0.008. All statistics in the text are correct, and the conclusions remain the same.
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  7.  1
    Yawning Is More Contagious in Pregnant Than Nulliparous Women.Ivan Norscia, Lucia Agostini, Alessia Moroni, Marta Caselli, Margherita Micheletti-Cremasco, Concetta Vardé & Elisabetta Palagi - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (2):301-325.
    Contrary to spontaneous yawning, which is widespread in vertebrates and probably evolutionary ancient, contagious yawning—yawning triggered by others’ yawns—is considered an evolutionarily recent phenomenon, found in species characterized by complex sociality. Whether the social asymmetry observed in the occurrence of contagious yawning is related to social and emotional attachment and may therefore reflect emotional contagion is a subject of debate. In this study we assessed whether yawn contagion was enhanced in pregnant women, a cohort of subjects who develop prenatal emotional (...)
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  8. Advancing the Psychometric Study of Human Life History Indicators.George B. Richardson, Nathan McGee & Lee T. Copping - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (2):363-386.
    In this article we attend to recent critiques of psychometric applications of life history theory to variance among humans and develop theory to advance the study of latent LH constructs. We then reanalyze data previously examined by Richardson et al., 2017, https://doi.org/10.1177/1474704916666840 to determine whether previously reported evidence of multidimensionality is robust to the modeling approach employed and the structure of LH indicators is invariant by sex. Findings provide further evidence that a single LH dimension is implausible and that researchers (...)
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  9.  1
    Parental Investment Is Biased toward Children Named for Their Fathers.Gabriel Šaffa, Zuzana Štěrbová & Pavol Prokop - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (2):387-405.
    Namesaking can be viewed as a mechanism to increase perceived parent-child similarity and, consequently, parental investment. Male and, to a lesser extent, firstborn children are more frequently namesakes than female and later-born children, respectively. However, a direct link between namesaking and parental investment has not been examined. In the present study, 632 participants from Central Europe indicated their first name, sex, birth order, number of siblings, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, paternal and maternal first names, as well as relationship quality with, (...)
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  10.  2
    Women’s Reaction to Opposite- and Same-Sex Infidelity in Three Cultures.Scott W. Semenyna, Francisco R. Gómez Jiménez & Paul L. Vasey - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (2):450-469.
    Previous research indicates that Euro-American women are more upset by imagining their male partners committing homosexual infidelities than heterosexual ones. The present studies sought to replicate these findings and extend them to two non-Western cultures wherein masculine men frequently engage in sexual interactions with feminine third-gender males. Across six studies in three cultural locales, women were asked to rate their degree of upset when imagining that their partner committed infidelity that was heterosexual in nature, as well as infidelity that was (...)
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  11. Learning Through Shared Care.Britt Singletary - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (2):326-362.
    This study investigates how allomaternal care impacts human development outside of energetics by evaluating relations between important qualitative and quantitative aspects of AMC and developmental outcomes in a Western population. This study seeks to determine whether there are measurable differences in cognitive and language outcomes as predicted by differences in exposure to AMC via formal and informal networks. Data were collected from 102 mothers and their typically developing infants aged 13–18 months. AMC predictor data were collected using questionnaires, structured daily (...)
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  12.  3
    Opportunities for Interaction.Tanya Broesch, Patrick L. Carolan, Senay Cebioğlu, Chris von Rueden, Adam Boyette, Cristina Moya, Barry Hewlett & Michelle A. Kline - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (1):208-238.
    We examine the opportunities children have for interacting with others and the extent to which they are the focus of others’ visual attention in five societies where extended family communities are the norm. We compiled six video-recorded datasets collected by a team of anthropologists and psychologists conducting long-term research in each society. The six datasets include video observations of children among the Yasawas, Tanna, Tsimane, Huatasani, and Aka. Each dataset consists of a series of videos of children ranging in age (...)
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  13.  2
    Correction to: Harm Avoidance and Mobility During Middle Childhood and Adolescence among Hadza Foragers.Alyssa N. Crittenden, Alan Farahani, Kristen N. Herlosky, Trevor R. Pollom, Ibrahim A. Mabulla, Ian T. Ruginski & Elizabeth Cashdan - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (1):177-177.
    A correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12110-021-09403-x.
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  14. Harm Avoidance and Mobility During Middle Childhood and Adolescence among Hadza Foragers.Alyssa N. Crittenden, Alan Farahani, Kristen N. Herlosky, Trevor R. Pollom, Ibrahim A. Mabulla, Ian T. Ruginski & Elizabeth Cashdan - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (1):150-176.
    Cross-cultural sex differences in mobility and harm avoidance have been widely reported, often emphasizing fitness benefits of long-distance travel for males and high costs for females. Data emerging from adults in small-scale societies, however, are challenging the assumption that female mobility is restricted during reproduction. Such findings warrant further exploration of the ontogeny of mobility. Here, using a combination of machine-learning, mixed-effects linear regression, and GIS mapping, we analyze range size, daily distance traveled, and harm avoidance among Hadza foragers during (...)
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  15.  6
    Ecological and Developmental Perspectives on Social Learning.Helen Elizabeth Davis, Alyssa N. Crittenden & Michelle Scalise Sugiyama - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (1):1-15.
    In this special issue of Human Nature we explore the possible adaptive links between teaching and learning during childhood, and we aim to expand the dialogue on the ways in which the social sciences, and in particular current anthropological research, may better inform our shifting understanding of how these processes vary in different social and ecological environments. Despite the cross-disciplinary trend toward incorporating more behavioral and cognitive data outside of postindustrial state societies, much of the published cross-cultural data is presented (...)
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  16.  3
    Cultural Change Reduces Gender Differences in Mobility and Spatial Ability among Seminomadic Pastoralist-Forager Children in Northern Namibia.Helen E. Davis, Jonathan Stack & Elizabeth Cashdan - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (1):178-206.
    A fundamental cognitive function found across a wide range of species and necessary for survival is the ability to navigate complex environments. It has been suggested that mobility may play an important role in the development of spatial skills. Despite evolutionary arguments offering logical explanations for why sex/gender differences in spatial abilities and mobility might exist, thus far there has been limited sampling from nonindustrialized and subsistence-based societies. This lack of sampling diversity has left many unanswered questions regarding the effects (...)
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  17.  2
    Correction to: Cultural Change Reduces Gender Differences in Mobility and Spatial Ability among Seminomadic Pastoralist-Forager Children in Northern Namibia.Helen E. Davis, Jonathan Stack & Elizabeth Cashdan - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (1):207-207.
    A Correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12110-021-09400-0.
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  18.  2
    Social Learning and Innovation in Adolescence.Bonnie Hewlett - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (1):239-278.
    This paper examines how innovative skills and knowledge are transmitted and acquired among adolescents in two hunter-gatherer communities, the Aka of southern Central African Republic and the Chabu of southwestern Ethiopia. Modes of transmission and processes of social learning are addressed. Innovation as well as social learning have been hypothesized to be key features of human cumulative culture, enhancing the fitness and survival of individuals in diverse environments. The innovation literature indicates adult males are more innovative than children and female (...)
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  19. Childhood Teaching and Learning among Savanna Pumé Hunter-Gatherers.Karen L. Kramer - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (1):87-114.
    Research in nonindustrial small-scale societies challenges the common perception that human childhood is universally characterized by a long period of intensive adult investment and dedicated instruction. Using return rate and time allocation data for the Savanna Pumé, a group of South American hunter-gatherers, age patterns in how children learn to become productive foragers and from whom they learn are observed across the transition from childhood to adolescence. Results show that Savanna Pumé children care for their siblings, are important economic contributors, (...)
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  20. The Life History of Learning Subsistence Skills among Hadza and BaYaka Foragers from Tanzania and the Republic of Congo.Sheina Lew-Levy, Erik J. Ringen, Alyssa N. Crittenden, Ibrahim A. Mabulla, Tanya Broesch & Michelle A. Kline - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (1):16-47.
    Aspects of human life history and cognition, such as our long childhoods and extensive use of teaching, theoretically evolved to facilitate the acquisition of complex tasks. The present paper empirically examines the relationship between subsistence task difficulty and age of acquisition, rates of teaching, and rates of oblique transmission among Hadza and BaYaka foragers from Tanzania and the Republic of Congo. We further examine cross-cultural variation in how and from whom learning occurred. Learning patterns and community perceptions of task difficulty (...)
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  21. Early Plant Learning in Fiji.Rita Anne McNamara & Annie E. Wertz - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (1):115-149.
    Recent work with infants suggests that plant foraging throughout evolutionary history has shaped the design of the human mind. Infants in Germany and the US avoid touching plants and engage in more social looking toward adults before touching them. This combination of behavioral avoidance and social looking strategies enables safe and rapid social learning about plant properties within the first two years of life. Here, we explore how growing up in a context that requires frequent interaction with plants shapes children’s (...)
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  22.  3
    Co‐occurrence of Ostensive Communication and Generalizable Knowledge in Forager Storytelling.Michelle Scalise Sugiyama - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (1):279-300.
    Teaching is hypothesized to be a species-typical behavior in humans that contributed to the emergence of cumulative culture. Several within-culture studies indicate that foragers depend heavily on social learning to acquire practical skills and knowledge, but it is unknown whether teaching is universal across forager populations. Teaching can be defined ethologically as the modification of behavior by an expert in the presence of a novice, such that the expert incurs a cost and the novice acquires skills/knowledge more efficiently or that (...)
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  23.  6
    Age-Appropriate Wisdom?Eric Schniter, Shane J. Macfarlan, Juan J. Garcia, Gorgonio Ruiz-Campos, Diego Guevara Beltran, Brenda B. Bowen & Jory C. Lerback - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (1):48-83.
    We investigate whether age profiles of ethnobiological knowledge development are consistent with predictions derived from life history theory about the timing of productivity and reproduction. Life history models predict complementary knowledge profiles developing across the lifespan for women and men as they experience changes in embodied capital and the needs of dependent offspring. We evaluate these predictions using an ethnobiological knowledge assessment tool developed for an off-grid pastoralist population known as Choyeros, from Baja California Sur, Mexico. Our results indicate that (...)
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  24.  1
    Correction to: Age-Appropriate Wisdom?Eric Schniter, Shane J. Macfarlan, Juan J. Garcia, Gorgonio Ruiz-Campos, Diego Guevara Beltran, Brenda B. Bowen & Jory C. Lerback - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (1):84-86.
    A Correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12110-021-09399-4.
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