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  1.  1
    Human Striving and Absolute Reliance Upon God: A Kierkegaardian Paradox.Lee C. Barrett - 2021 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 26 (1):139-164.
    Kierkegaard’s texts suggest countervailing construals of the respective roles of divine and human agency in an individual’s pursuit of blessedness. Kierkegaard paradoxically suggests that the individual must depend entirely on grace for the birth and development of faith, and at the same time actively cultivate faithful dispositions and passions. But Kierkegaard did not espouse Calvinistic divine determinism, or Pelagian autonomous human agency, or the Arminian cooperation of the two. For Kierkegaard, the ostensible paradox of grace and free will is not (...)
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  2. In Search of “That Archimedean Point”: The Development of Selfhood in Kierkegaard’s Journal of Gilleleje.Nassim Bravo - 2021 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 26 (1):3-24.
    This article offers a philosophical account of the so-called journal of Gilleleje. I would like to argue that in this text from 1835 one can trace the early philosophical musings of Kierkegaard on the existential question of the discovery of the self and the development of selfhood, one of the main motifs in the authorship of the Dane. Additionally, I discuss the literary trends of the 1830s in Golden Age Denmark, particularly the boom of the Danish short novel and Heiberg’s (...)
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  3.  5
    What is Worldly Logic and Why Might It Lead to Suicide? Kierkegaard, Wittgenstein, and the Critique of Logic.Charles Djordjevic - 2021 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 26 (1):459-487.
    In contemporary philosophy, there is a growing interest in how Søren Kierkegaard’s metaphilosophy and philosophical methodology may have influenced Ludwig Wittgenstein. This paper contributes to this discussion by arguing that each shares and critiques a particular conception of logic that I term “worldly logic.” Roughly, “worldly logic” contends logic and metaphysics are intimately interconnected. It further argues that reading Kierkegaard’s brief thoughts on logic, in the Climacus texts, through the lens of the later Wittgenstein, helps to clarify the nature of (...)
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  4.  1
    On the Limitations of Lao Sze Kwang’s “Trichotomy of the Self” in His Interpretation of Kierkegaard.Andrew Ka-Pok-Tam - 2021 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 26 (1):523-545.
    In 1959, Lao Sze-Kwang, a well-known Chinese Kantian philosopher and author of the New Edition of the History of Chinese Philosophy, published On Existentialist Philosophy introducing existential philosophers to Chinese readers. This paper argues that Lao misinterpreted Kierkegaard’s ultimate philosophical quest of “how to become a Christian” as a question of ‘virtue completion,’ because he failed to recognize and acknowledge Kierkegaard’s distinction between aesthetic, moral and religious passion. By describing and clarifying Lao’s misinterpretation, the paper then argues that Lao’s trichotomy (...)
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  5.  1
    “The Greatest Sculptor”: Bertel Thorvaldsen According to Kierkegaard.Giulia Longo - 2021 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 26 (1):405-428.
    The common ground where Thorvaldsen and Kierkegaard meet is Copenhagen. This essay focuses on the places—both physical and theoretical—in which the comparison between the two is made possible. First of all, the Vor Frue Kirke, where some of Thorvaldsen’s most important sculptures are displayed, as well as where Kierkegaard used to go both as a member of the community and as a preacher. This article presents a perspective on the intersection that exists in a horizontal sense for Thorvaldsen, and for (...)
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  6.  1
    “Your Existence is a Delight to Us.” An Investigation Into the Identity of the Neighbour in Kierkegaard’s Works of Love.Kresten Lundsgaard-Leth - 2021 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 26 (1):73-103.
    In this paper, I look into the identity of the neighbour in Kierkegaard’s Works of Love, whom I argue has not been identified adequately by previous interpreters. I propose to clarify the identity of the neighbour by contrasting her with the ethical other as presented in four alternative ethical theories. I then set out to reconstruct ethical otherhood in a comparative analysis of Aristotelian virtue ethics, Kantian deontology, Hegelian theory of recognition, and Millian utilitarianism. Ultimately, through a both close and—admittedly—productive (...)
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  7.  16
    The (Im)Proper Community: On the Concept of Eiendommelighed in Kierkegaard.Kasper Lysemose - 2021 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 26 (1):271-299.
    The aim of the paper is to demonstrate that the concept of Eiendommelighed in Kierkegaard has a considerable philosophical weight, although it figures only marginally. It is emphasized that Kierkegaard—well ahead of the deconstruction of community in contemporary philosophy—creates a concept by which the complicity of singularity and community becomes evident. The gist of the concept is an indistinction between the proper and the improper. Eiendommelighed is that by which singularities, or neighbors, are called into the inappropriability of their ownmost (...)
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  8.  1
    Without Authority: Kierkegaard’s Resistance to Patriarchy.Frances Maughan-Brown - 2021 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 26 (1):301-323.
    The phrase, “Without Authority,” is used so frequently by Kierkegaard that it becomes a kind of signature; yet it remains little understood. I argue that the phrase works to resist patriarchal, top-down, institutionally sanctioned authority: the authority of “direct” communication. Kierkegaard is not alone in contesting the tyranny of patriarchy: another tyranny—of anonymity, of the crowd—threatens to do away with patriarchal authority too, and with it all authority, all communication. Kierkegaard’s “without authority” defies patriarchy and does so at the risk (...)
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  9. Ecophilosophy and the Ambivalence of Nature: Kierkegaard and Knausgård on Lilies, Birds and Being.Marius Timmann Mjaaland - 2021 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 26 (1):325-350.
    In The Lily in the Field and the Bird of the Air, Kierkegaard presents a succinct critique of Romantic aesthetics, in line with contemporary critiques of ecocriticism and ecophilosophy, e.g. by Timothy Morton. Whereas Romantic poets see nature as a mirror of their inner thoughts and pathos, thereby divinising themselves and their creativity, Kierkegaard emphasises the authority of the Creator and the exteriority of nature. He identifies the consequences of such Romantic self-infatuation on all levels of discourse: aesthetics, ethics, epistemology (...)
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  10.  2
    Towards the Socratic Mission: Imitatio Socratis.Mathias G. Parding - 2021 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 26 (1):193-222.
    It is known that Kierkegaard’s relation to politics was problematic and marked by a somewhat reactionary stance. The nature of this problematic relation, however, will be shown to lie in the tension between his double skepticism of the order of establishment [det Bestående] on the one hand, and the political associations of his age on the other. In this tension he is immersed, trembling between Scylla and Charybdis. On the one hand Kierkegaard is hesitant to support the progressive political movements (...)
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  11.  1
    The Liberating Cacophony of Feelings: Kierkegaard on Emotions.René Rosfort - 2021 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 26 (1):241-269.
    This article argues that Kierkegaard’s account of emotions has something important to contribute to contemporary philosophy of emotions. The argument proceeds in five steps. The first section starts by outlining two influential paradigms in contemporary philosophy of emotions: the feeling theories and the cognitive theories. The second section then turns to a critique of two prominent approaches that read Kierkegaard’s conception of emotions as belonging to the cognitive theories. The third section presents Kierkegaard as a phenomenologist of emotional ambiguity, while (...)
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  12. Kierkegaard and the Publisher’s Peritext.Troy Wellington Smith - 2021 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 26 (1):549-565.
    Bruun and Hansen claim that Kierkegaard decided to publish Two Ethical-Religious Essays on commission with Gyldendal so as not to be linked to the penname H.H. Elsewhere, however, Kierkegaard indicates that the Essays, although they stand outside of the authorship, are to be understood in relation to it. Furthermore, Bruun and Hansen do not explain why Kierkegaard chose Gyldendal and not some other house. Drawing on Gérard Genette’s concept of the peritext, I argue that it was Gyldendal’s reputation as a (...)
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  13. Sibbern’s Anticipations of Kierkegaard’s Polemic Against the Hegelians: The Critique of Abstraction.Jon Stewart - 2021 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 26 (1):353-370.
    The present article argues that the philosopher Frederik Christian Sibbern played a fairly substantive role in the development of what has come to be known as Kierkegaard’s critique of Hegel. Specifically, Sibbern had already worked out some of the key elements of Kierkegaard’s critique that culminates in the Concluding Unscientific Postscript. This is demonstrated by means of an analysis of two works by Sibbern which are important for his critical discussion of Hegel’s philosophy: Remarks and Investigations Primarily Concerning Hegel’s Philosophy (...)
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  14.  2
    Between Deception and Authority: Kierkegaard’s Use of Scripture in the Discourses, “Thoughts That Wound From Behind—for Upbuilding”.Kevin Storer - 2021 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 26 (1):51-71.
    This paper explores the tension in Kierkegaard’s Christian discourses between Kierkegaard’s overt emphasis on Scriptural authority and Kierkegaard’s imaginative Scriptural use, through an analysis of the discourse series, “Thoughts That Wound from Behind—for Upbuilding.” The paper argues that Kierkegaard employs Scriptural language both imaginatively to create distanciation and directly to create confrontation, without differentiating how Scriptural authority functions in these two uses. The paper concludes that when Kierkegaard emphasizes Scriptural authority, he is really emphasizing the authority of “Christian concepts” stabilized (...)
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  15.  1
    Hans L. Martensen on Self-Consciousness, Mysticism, and Freedom.Curtis L. Thompson - 2021 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 26 (1):371-404.
    This article examines three early writings of Hans L. Martensen, Søren Kierkegaard’s teacher and the target of his criticisms. The writings focus respectively on self-consciousness, mysticism, and freedom. They each make important claims about religion, and together they disclose the young Martensen’s systematic understanding of the epistemological, mystical, and moral-ethical dimensions of human experience as shaped by the representations of Christian faith and life. The analysis reveals an agile thinker, whose creative philosophical and theological ideas are the product of imaginative (...)
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  16.  5
    The Tale of Two Seducers: Existential Entrapment in the Works of Kierkegaard and Dostoevsky.Petr Vaškovic - 2021 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 26 (1):431-457.
    The present study poses a simple question, namely, what are the specific forces that might at times hinder rather than advance individual moral development? To answer this inquiry, I will investigate the writings of Kierkegaard and Dostoevsky, examining the two aesthetic protagonists found in their works—Johannes the Seducer and Dmitri Karamazov. I will utilise the Kierkegaardian framework of the three existential stages to illustrate that it is an over-reliance on gratification, coupled with an instrumental approach towards beings that not only (...)
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  17.  2
    The Hidden Divine Experimenter: Kierkegaard on Providence.N. Verbin - 2021 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 26 (1):165-191.
    The paper is concerned with the nature of Kierkegaard’s commitment to God’s loving providence as it shows itself in his writings in general, and in his remarks on Governance’s Part in his Authorship in particular. I argue that, for Kierkegaard, God’s loving providence is not an objective fact that he discovers as intervening in nature, history or in his private life and authorship. Rather, God’s loving providence is fundamentally hidden in the wretchedness of existence. God is like a hidden experimenter (...)
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  18. The Concept of State in Kierkegaard’s Papers.Matías Tapia Wende - 2021 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 26 (1):105-136.
    In this paper, I aim to show the evolution of Kierkegaard’s views on the state scattered in his Papers. To do this, I will carry out an analysis divided into chronological periods, and I will characterize each period in terms of its main features. The goal is to give a comprehensive account of Kierkegaard as a champion of the monarchical and authoritative state, who loses his patience and attacks the established order only when he thinks that Christianity’s truth is at (...)
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