11 found

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  1.  1
    Comment Remotiver Un Cliché Historiographique? Poésie du Xviiie Siècle Et Baroque des Anthologies.Maxime Cartron - 2021 - Lumen 40:213-224.
    Today, eighteenth-century poetry is undervalued by readers and scholars alike, still the victim of a persistent bias among French literary historians who consider this period as rationalist and antipoetic, an era of unfortunate verse that was fortunately ushered out by Romanticism. By reading a corpus of anthologies of seventeenth-century French poetry published in the twentieth century, this article investigates a particular modality of this invalidation: how the aesthetic merits of the Baroque are elaborated against highly critical readings of eighteenth-century poetry. (...)
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  2. Les Croisements de L’Éthique Et des Morales Entre Francophonie Et Anglophonie À L’'Ge Classique.Jean-Pierre Cléro - 2021 - Lumen 40:1-34.
    During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, French authors did not ignore the word “éthique,” but neither did they make it play a specific role in their works like they did with “morale,” their preferred term. By contrast, English writers were more likely than their counterparts to distinguish “Ethicks” from “Morals.” Consequently, it is mainly in English-language writings that the separation of the two terms can be found. The key authors invested in refining these distinctions are Locke, Shaftesbury, Hutcheson, Hume, and (...)
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  3.  1
    What Is an Animal? Contagion and Being Human in a Multispecies World.Lucinda Cole - 2021 - Lumen 40:35-53.
    From the early modern period to well into the eighteenth century, cattle plagues, murrains, or what were called “great cattle mortalities” were often analogized to bubonic plague; felling animals in devastating numbers, these catastrophes likewise afflicted living creatures on a grand scale. Three Enlightenment cattle pandemics propelled governments across Europe to enact harsh regulatory measures, including widespread slaughters, quarantines, and major disruptions of trade. This article examines works by Theophilus Lobb, Richard Bradley, Nathaniel Hodges, and Daniel Defoe, among other writers (...)
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  4. Désir de Distinction Et Dynamique Sociale Chez L’Abbé de Saint-Pierre.Carole Dornier - 2021 - Lumen 40:55-73.
    The Abbé de Saint-Pierre sought to develop a science regarding morals that aimed at “the greatest happiness of the greatest number.” In his system, heroic morality and Christian asceticism give way to merit, the service of the nation, and values devoid of any charismatic dimension. Against an intention-based approach inspired by Augustinianism and against Mandeville’s abandonment of self-interest, Saint-Pierre devised political institutions and collective educational programs that guided the desire of distinction toward public utility. Properly channelled, the pleasure of being (...)
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  5.  1
    Defoe’s Unchristian Colonel: Captivity Narratives and Resistance to Conversion.Catherine Fleming - 2021 - Lumen 40:195-212.
    Daniel Defoe’s fictional autobiographies often contain a puritanical conversion narrative, but Colonel Jack’s narrator is unique in his problematized relationship to Christian conversion. Alert to the negative implications of mercenary conversion, Defoe presents in Colonel Jack a hero who not only revels in his complex ploys to evade the law, but explicitly rejects conversion to Christianity at several points in the narrative. By reading Colonel Jack alongside narratives of European enslavement and incarceration, I suggest that in this text Defoe deliberately (...)
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  6.  1
    De la Sociabilité À la Pudeur : L’Éthique des Larmes au Xviiie Siècle.Zeina Hakim - 2021 - Lumen 40:183-193.
    The eighteenth century occupies a crucial place in the history of tears. Not only did this period gave rise to the concept of sensibility, but it also witnessed the development of new aesthetic and moral codes founded on the exaggerated use of tears. This article, which is concerned precisely with such codes, examines the nature and significance of emotional display in the eighteenth century. It argues that throughout this era, tears were associated with moral renewal and they were intended to (...)
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  7.  2
    “Wise Passiveness”: Wordsworth, Spinoza, and the Ethics of Passivity.Jérémie LeClerc - 2021 - Lumen 40:75-97.
    This article frames the poetry of William Wordsworth and the philosophical writings of Spinoza as mutually illuminating works exploring the ethical and ontological questions raised by bodies in states of passivity and immobility. Both writers, it argues, revise our idea of what a “powerful” body might be by developing the concept of “dynamic passivity”—a passivity that does not stand in simple opposition to states of activity, and that ought to be cultivated rather than overcome in the process of empowering the (...)
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  8. The Ethical Development of Boys in Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Emile and Jean-Baptiste Greuze’s Artworks.Loren Lerner - 2021 - Lumen 40:121-146.
    This article considers the ways in which a series of artworks by French artist Jean-Baptiste Greuze focus on the father’s ethical education of his male children, reading these as a close visualization of the pedagogical theories of Rousseau. Through paintings that contemplate family life, religious sentiment, filial piety, obedience versus disobedience, illness, and death, Greuze’s images of male youth coalesce with the ethics promoted in Rousseau’s novel Emile—stressing in particular the compassion and good conscience that a boy should develop under (...)
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  9.  1
    Éthique de Deux Libertins Incarcérés : Mirabeau Et Sade Épistoliers.Sophie Rothé - 2021 - Lumen 40:99-119.
    Mirabeau and Sade, who were incarcerated in the Castle of Vincennes in the same period for breaching moral standards, pursued a correspondence filled with ethical reflections from their time in prison. Their epistolary exchanges in jail show their interest in the penal reform initiated by Beccaria and carried out at the end of the eighteenth century. Their letters likewise underscore the incommensurable aspect of institutional power, the failures of the French judicial system, and the strategies used to crush prisoners. They (...)
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  10.  1
    Academe Vs. Hollywood: Sweet Liberty, or the Dilemmas of Historical Representation on Film.Guy Spielmann - 2021 - Lumen 40:165-181.
    In Sweet Liberty, writer and director Alan Alda dramatizes the process of turning a scholarly study about the American Revolutionary War into a Hollywood film; he does so in ways that bring out the ethical complexities of adaptation, and eventually takes them to a meta-filmic level rarely seen in non-experimental cinema. While Sweet Liberty initially comes off as a light comedy with a predictable plot and ending, on closer inspection it compels us to reflect on the relationship between historical research (...)
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  11.  2
    Legacies of Enlightenment: Diderot’s La Religieuse and Its Cinematic Adaptations.Amy S. Wyngaard - 2021 - Lumen 40:147-163.
    La Religieuse is a classic French Enlightenment work in its elucidation of forced religious vocation as well as the hypocrisy and abuses of the Catholic Church. In reviving and effectively re-envisioning the novel, filmmakers Jacques Rivette and Guillaume Nicloux succeed in bringing Diderot’s ideas to bear on contemporary issues such as the image and role of the Church post Vatican II, and the effects of patriarchal and religious oppression on the individual. This article examines the context and reception of all (...)
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