History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis

ISSNs: 2666-4283, 2666-4275

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  1.  2
    Zersplitterte und gesammelte Gegenwart bei Augustinus: Das Verhältnis von physikalischer und psychologischer Zeit.Friedemann Drews - 2024 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 26 (2):387-415.
    This paper tries to ‘liberate’ Augustine’s view on time from certain modern prejudices, e.g. that the church father’s theory of time involves the modern dichotomy between subjectivism and objectivism (Ricœur), that his understanding of time can be seen as a precursor of modern phenomenology (Husserl, Heidegger), that Conf. XI lacks a coherent theory of time as such or that, at least, it falls short of the insights of Kant’s enlightened transcendentalism (Flasch). By contrast, the church father circumvents typically modern aporiai (...)
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  2.  14
    Where, When, and Why Is Zeno’s Arrow Unmoved? – A Note on the Zenonian Challenge in Aristotle’s Physics, Book VI.Gottfried Heinemann - 2024 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 26 (2):207-231.
    Zeno’s arrow does not move “in the now” (Phys. VI 8, 239b2) or, equivalently, “in the place it is” (DK 29 B 4). Zeno concludes from this that the arrow does not move at all. In Aristotle (ibid. 9, 239b5–9, 31–33), Zeno’s argument takes the form of an invalid inference from instants to periods of time. Insofar as it fails to bring out an inconsistency in Aristotle’s account of motion, the paradox is thus eliminated. That instantaneous motion is a contradiction (...)
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  3. Time of Change in Plato and Aristotle.Ondřej Krása - 2024 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 26 (2):232-252.
    When do things change? When do things have some characteristics? I try to answer these questions by looking at different solutions Plato and Aristotle presented in their works. The famous analysis of change from the second half of Plato’s Parmenides claims that change happens outside of time, at an “instant”. On the contrary, Aristotle in the Physics explicitly argues that all change occurs only in time. However, both Plato and Aristotle also provide other analyses of change. How to deal with (...)
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  4.  4
    In Search of Present Time. Which Role Can It Play for Aristotle?Walter Mesch - 2024 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 26 (2):253-274.
    In his theory of time Aristotle does not often mention the present time and nowhere gives a detailed account of it. Nonetheless, present time plays an important role in his conception. I primarily argue for the following claims: (1) According to Aristotle there is a perception of motion and there is a perception of time. These combined perceptions can neither occur in the past nor in the future nor in an indivisible now. Thus, there must be a present time. (2) (...)
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  5.  3
    Therapeutic Presentisms: A Hedonist and a Stoic in Agreement?Georgia Mouroutsou - 2024 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 26 (2):321-340.
    This article focuses on two very different thinkers from different periods of time, an early hedonist who belonged to Socrates’ circle and lived until the middle of the fourth century BCE and the late Stoic who ruled the Roman Empire in the second century CE. Despite all substantial divergences – for instance, on the value of pleasure – Aristippus the Elder and Marcus Aurelius shared an interest in presentism, broadly construed as a focus on the present and its primacy, and (...)
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  6.  2
    Damascius on the Sudden (to exaiphnēs) and the Now (to nun).Spyridon Rangos - 2024 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 26 (2):341-365.
    Damascius’ discussion of the Platonic notions of the sudden (to exaiphnēs) and the now (to nun) occurs in the context of his Commentary on Plato’s Parmenides. His view is that the Platonic sudden should be identified not with the timeless essence of the individual human soul, as Proclus suggested, but with the cohesive element that holds the individual human soul together through the cycles of reincarnation. For Damascius, the human soul is so thoroughly intertwined with time, when it descends to (...)
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  7.  3
    General Introduction on the Present Time in “Now, Exaiphnês, and the Present Moment”.Barbara M. Sattler - 2024 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 26 (2):177-180.
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  8. Aristotle’s “Now” and the Definition of Time: Method and Exegesis in Simplicius’ Interpretation of Physics IV.10.Thomas Seissl - 2024 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 26 (2):366-386.
    Physics IV.10 (217b30–218a30) is pivotal in Aristotle’s discussion of time, preceding his own account from IV.11 onward. Aristotle presents three puzzles about the existence of time with reference to the “Now”. Modern interpretations often view this section as an aporetic prelude with Aristotle’s failure to provide explicit solutions. This paper examines Simplicius’ alternative interpretation, which draws upon the theory of proof and the syllogistic model from the Posterior Analytics. Simplicius contends that the arguments’ failure lies in their inability to fit (...)
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  9.  2
    Are Kinetic and Temporal Continuities Real for Aristotle?Mark Sentesy - 2024 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 26 (2):275-302.
    Aristotle argues that time depends on soul to count it, but adds that motion, which makes time what it is, may be independent of soul. The claim that time depends on soul or mind implies that there is at least one measurable property of natural beings that exists because of the mind’s activity. This paper argues that for Aristotle time depends partly on soul, but more importantly on motion, which defines a continuum. This argument offers a robust metaphysics of time. (...)
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  10. Is Standard Music Notation Able to Picture Aristotle’s Time?Niko Strobach - 2024 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 26 (2):303-320.
    It is argued that standard music notation pictures Aristotle’s time (time, as Aristotle conceived of it) in a number of important respects, which concern its micro-structure. It is then argued that this allows us to see some features of Aristotle’s time more clearly. Most importantly, Aristotelian instants can be pictured by bar-lines. This allows us to see as how radically devoid of any content Aristotelian instants should be interpreted. Thus, attention to music notation may show why Aristotle was not a (...)
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  11.  3
    Do Real Contradictions Belong to Heraclitus’ Conception of Change? The Anti-cognate Internal Object Gives a Sign.Celso Vieira - 2024 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 26 (2):184-206.
    Heraclitus uses paradoxical language to present the relationship between opposites in his worldview. This mode of expression has generated much controversy. Some take the paradoxes as evidence of a contradictory identity of opposites (Barnes), while others propose a dynamic union through transformation without identity that avoids the contradiction (Graham). By examining B88 and B62, I seek to identify the stronger and weaker points of such readings. The contradictory identity reading thwarts the transformation between opposites. The dynamic reading offers a plausible (...)
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