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  1.  3
    How Do Healthcare Professionals Respond to Ethical Challenges Regarding Information Management? A Review of Empirical Studies.Cornelius Ewuoso, Susan Hall & Kris Dierickx - 2021 - Global Bioethics 32 (1):67-84.
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  2.  5
    Relational Solidarity and COVID-19: An Ethical Approach to Disrupt the Global Health Disparity Pathway.Anita Ho & Iulia Dascalu - 2021 - Global Bioethics 32 (1):34-50.
    While the effects of COVID-19 are being felt globally, the pandemic disproportionately affects lower- and middle-income countries by exacerbating existing global health disparities. In this article, we illustrate how intersecting upstream social determinants of global health form a disparity pathway that compromises LMICs’ ability to respond to the pandemic. We consider pre-existing disease burden and baseline susceptibility, limited disease prevention resources, and unequal access to basic and specialized health care, essential drugs, and clinical trials. Recognizing that ongoing and underlying disparity (...)
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  3.  3
    Researchers’ Perspectives on Return of Individual Genetics Results to Research Participants: A Qualitative Study.Erisa Sabakaki Mwaka, Deborah Ekusai Sebatta, Joseph Ochieng, Ian Guyton Munabi, Godfrey Bagenda, Deborah Ainembabazi & David Kaawa-Mafigiri - 2021 - Global Bioethics 32 (1):15-33.
    Genetic results are usually not returned to research participants in Uganda despite their increased demand. We report on researchers’ perceptions and experiences of return of individual genetic research results. The study involved 15 in-depth interviews of investigators involved in genetics and/or genomic research. A thematic approach was used to interpret the results. The four themes that emerged from the data were the need for return of individual results including incidental findings, community engagement and the consenting process, implications and challenges to (...)
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  4.  1
    Exploring Values Among Three Cultures From a Global Bioethics Perspective.Nico Nortjé, Kristen Jones-Bonofiglio & Claudia R. Sotomayor - 2021 - Global Bioethics 32 (1):1-14.
    The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation’s Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights refers to the importance of cultural diversity and pluralism in ethical discourse and care of humanity. The aim of this meta-narrative review is to identify indigenous ethical values pertaining to the Ojibway, Xhosa, and Mayan cultures from peer-reviewed sources and cultural review, and to ascertain if there are shared commonalities. Three main themes were identified, namely illness, healing, and health care choices. Illness was described with a (...)
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  5. Ethical Considerations for DNA Testing as a Proxy for Nationality.Valedie Oray & Sara H. Katsanis - 2021 - Global Bioethics 32 (1):51-66.
    As nations strengthen borders and restrict refugee admissions, national security officials are screening for fraudulent nationality claims. One tool to investigate nationality claims is DNA testing, either for claimed relationships or for ancestral origins. At the same time, the plight of global statelessness leaves millions without documentation of their nationality, and DNA testing might be the only recourse to provide evidence of heritage or relationships. DNA testing has been used sparsely to date to determine ancestral origin as a proxy for (...)
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