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  1.  1
    Previable Induction of Labor for Life-Threatening Maternal Disease Without Placental Pathology.Cara Buskmiller - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (2):249-262.
    Pregnancy causes maternal pathology by combining maternal predispositions with healthy physiology. In maternal cardiovascular collapse, previable induction of labor is justifiable despite the definition of abortion in directive 45 of the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services. Central to this conclusion, the placenta is a fetal organ, and pregnancy is a cardiovascular condition placing new demands on the maternal cardiovascular system. Previable delivery, a morally neutral separation, addresses the cause of pathology even if fetal death is anticipated. (...)
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  2. Transcending Gender Ideology: A Philosophy of Sexual Difference by Antonio Malo. [REVIEW]Perry J. Cahall - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (2):352-355.
  3.  17
    Avoiding Illicit Cooperation with Evil.Kevin Flannery - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (2):231-246.
    The essay begins with an explanation of St. Alphonsus Liguori’s understanding of the distinction between formal and material cooperation, identifying also some problems inherent in that understanding. The essay goes on to expound related ideas in the writings of St. Thomas Aquinas, ideas that are applicable to cases not easily analyzable by means of the distinction between formal and material cooperation. The essay then applies these ideas to two contemporary issues: the use of vaccines connected in some way with abortions (...)
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  4.  1
    Resisting Throwaway Culture: How a Consistent Life Ethic Can Unite a Fractured People by Charles C. Camosy. [REVIEW]Julie Grimstad - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (2):349-351.
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  5.  1
    Virgin Suicide and Vital Conflicts.Anthony Paul Hollowell - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (2):281-296.
    When threatened with rape, is it permissible for a virgin to commit suicide so that she might preserve her virginity? Both St. John Chrysostom and St. Ambrose allowed for suicide in these situations because they considered it a martyrdom, but St. Augustine argued that such an act is always illicit unless commanded by God, a teaching later adopted by St. Thomas Aquinas. In this paper, these arguments will be presented and then applied to cases of vital conflict, which involve many (...)
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  6.  2
    Mr. Humble and Dr. Butcher: A Monkey’s Head, the Pope’s Neuroscientist, and the Quest to Transplant the Soul by Brandy Schillace. [REVIEW]Colten P. Maertens-Pizzo - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (2):355-358.
  7.  4
    Basic Beliefs, the Embryo Rescue Case, and Single-Issue Voting.Tyler McNabb & Michael DeVito - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (2):203-208.
    In this essay, we respond to Dustin Crummett’s argument that one cannot consistently appeal to body count reasoning to justify being a single-issue pro-life voter if one is also committed to the usual response to the embryo rescue case. Specifically, we argue that a modified version of BCR we call BCR* is consistent with the usual response. We then move to address concerns about the relevance of BCR* to Crummett’s original thesis.
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  8.  2
    Protecting Autonomy and Dignity in Organ Donation Postmortem Through Family Decision Making.Paul Riffon - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (2):263-279.
    Often-cited papal pronouncements regarding organ donation emphasize the importance of gift giving and the consent of the donor. However, a critical reading reveals an ill-defined separation of living organ donation and donation after death. Given that a corpse cannot engage in gift giving, nor can it give consent, the family, acting as good stewards, is the proper decision maker for organ donation after death. A historical examination of relics and human anatomical dissection reveals that the Catholic Church has primarily favored (...)
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  9. Are Immortalized Cell Lines Artifacts?Paul Scherz - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (2):219-230.
    Recent magisterial teaching suggests that Catholics should prefer COVID-19 vaccines in which immortalized cells derived from the remains of aborted fetuses did not play a role in production, even though all of them can be licitly used. Many scholars contest any distinction between the different vaccines, in part by arguing that these cell lines have become artifacts. This argument is inadequate on a number of levels. First, these scholars have not sufficiently proven the point that the cell lines become artifacts (...)
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  10.  1
    Washington Insider.Greg Schleppenbach - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (2):195-200.
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  11.  1
    Complicity or Justified Cooperation in Evil?Helen Watt - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (2):209-218.
    Cooperation in wrongdoing is an everyday matter for all of us, though we need to discern when such cooperation is morally excluded as constituting formal cooperation, as opposed to material cooperation whether justified or otherwise. In this paper, I offer examples of formal cooperation such as referral of patients for certain procedures where the cooperating doctor intends an intrinsically wrongful plan of action on the part of the patient and a medical colleague. I also consider a case of formal cooperation (...)
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  12. Conscience: Phenomena and Theories by Hendrik Stoker. [REVIEW]Brian Welter - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (2):358-360.
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  13.  1
    Magisterial Teaching on the Foundation of Sexual Ethics.Irene Alexander - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (1):85-105.
    This article seeks to demonstrate that the perverted faculty argument is at the foundation of magisterial teaching in sexual ethics. Yet new natural law theorists have consistently condemned this argument for decades despite their claim that they support the moral teachings of the Catholic Church. This situation is incongruous. Current scholarship indicates that NNL theorists do not accept the rationale for magisterial teaching in sexual ethics because, despite their opposition to proportionalism, they still hold in common its most critical error—an (...)
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  14. Embryo Adoption and the Extended Inseparability Argument.Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (1):29-35.
    The Catholic debate over embryo adoption is at a genuine impasse awaiting resolution from the magisterium of the Catholic Church because both sides have reached a point where there is a fundamental disagreement. Several Catholic ethicists have argued that the ethical reasoning linking the acts of having sex and of making a baby, and therefore reserving both to the causality of a husband, should be extended to the act of becoming pregnant. This would rule out embryo transfer in all its (...)
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  15. Reading Samaritanus Bonus in Light of Magisterial Teaching and Recent Papal Writings.Gerald D. Coleman - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (1):37-43.
    On July 14, 2020, the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith issued Samaritanus bonus, beckoning the human family to take the Good Samaritan as the ideal in the care of all persons in critical and terminal phases of their lives. The import of this letter is understood best as seen through three prisms: Fratelli tutti, the encyclical of Pope Francis signed at Assisi on October 3, 2020; the Declaration on Euthanasia issued by the CDF in 1980; and “the remarkable (...)
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  16. Harm Reduction for Intravenous Substance Use.Cara L. Connaughton & Jillian J. Boerstler - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (1):69-84.
    North America is facing an ongoing, persistent opioid epidemic, and Vancouver, British Columbia, continues to be one of its devastating epicenters, with record overdose deaths in 2020. Roman Catholic health care organizations in Vancouver are compelled to pioneer potential solutions to this public health crisis—in solidarity and employing necessary strategies to help the most vulnerable in the communities served. While controversial, harm reduction strategies for intravenous substance use keep people alive until they are able to receive the help that they (...)
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  17. Motherhood as a Sacrificial Self-Gift.Barbara Dugan - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (1):45-55.
    This essay argues against Charles Camosy’s proposal, found in his book Beyond the Abortion Wars, for premature induction of labor in a mother whose child is diagnosed with a life-limiting disease, such as Potter syndrome. This proposal is critiqued within the context of motherhood as sacrificial self-gift, which has been raised to new heights by the Incarnation and Resurrection of Christ, as witnessed by the motherhood of Mary.
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  18.  1
    Mary and Bioethics: An Exploration by Francis Etheredge. [REVIEW]Colten P. Maertens-Pizzo - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (1):174-177.
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  19.  4
    Dignitas Personae, HEK 293, and the COVID Vaccines.Melissa Moschella - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (1):107-121.
    Using cell lines like HEK 293 or their products—like many of the COVID-19 vaccines—involves no cooperation with evil strictly speaking, but it does involve appropriation of the benefits of past evil. Applying M. Cathleen Kaveny’s framework for assessing the permissibility of appropriating the benefits of evil, the duty to avoid using cell lines like HEK 293 or their products is weak and defeasible. Proper interpretation of Dignitas personae requires recognizing the crucial moral differences between the use of these cell lines—which (...)
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  20. The New Definitions of Death for Organ Donation: A Multidisciplinary Analysis From the Perspective of Christian Ethics by Doyen Nguyen. [REVIEW]Adam Omelianchuk - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (1):180-182.
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  21. Washington Insider.William L. Saunders - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (1):19-26.
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  22. Discerning Persons: Profound Disability, the Early Church Fathers, and the Concept of the Person in Bioethics by Pia Matthews. [REVIEW]Columba Thomas - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (1):177-180.
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  23. Colloquy.Gregory K. Webster - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (1):13-15.
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  24. Reading Wittgenstein with Anscombe, Going on to Ethics by Cora Diamond. [REVIEW]Brian Welter - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (1):171-173.
  25. Template Policy for Catholic Health Care and Gender Identity.Jozef D. Zalot - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (1):57-65.
    Gender ideology and medical interventions for so-called transitioning pose profound challenges for Catholic health care. Unfortunately, many institutions do not offer clear, specific policy guidance addressing these issues. This template policy is offered to Catholic health care institutions and systems to assist them in drafting such guidance. The template defines the mission of Catholic health care, summarizes Church teaching with regard to gender ideology, and identifies both licit and illicit clinical interventions for gender dysphoria. The template also offers guidance on (...)
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