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  1. Auxiliaries and War-Financing in the Roman Republic.François Gauthier - 2019 - Journal of Ancient History 7 (2):251-268.
    Auxiliaries are usually studied in the late Republic or the Imperial period. Despite this emphasis in modern research, auxiliaries were employed in substantial numbers during the third and second centuries BCE. Auxiliaries did make a crucial contribution to the Roman war effort in the Middle Republic, providing a substantial part of Rome’s military manpower. These troops were most often financed by the community providing them, allowing the Roman state to save a great deal of money if similar numbers of Roman (...)
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  2. Defining Rome’s Pantheum.Christopher Siwicki - 2019 - Journal of Ancient History 7 (2):269-316.
    Writing in the early third century AD, Julius Africanus claimed to have built a library “in the Pantheon” in Rome, the exact location of which remains elusive. In considering the competing possibilities for the site of the library, this paper argues that the building we commonly refer to as the Pantheon does not correspond to the ancient understanding of what the Pantheum was. The case is made that it was not a single building, but instead comprised a larger complex, of (...)
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  3.  10
    Society and Civil War in Africa During the Tetrarchy: The Rebellion of Lucius Domitius Alexander.Laurent J. Cases - 2019 - Journal of Ancient History 7 (1):233-250.
    In the year 308 CE, the African army raised to the purple the agens vices praefectorum praetorio Lucius Domitius Alexander. This rather unique case of a vicarius becoming emperor is deserving of investigation. Scholarly interest on the matter has traditionally focused on the broader political significance, treating Alexander as a traditional usurper. This paper argues that, contrary to traditional studies, the regime of Alexander focused on very local, African tropes. The uniqueness of the advertisement suggests that this African usurpation was (...)
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  4.  4
    Becoming Empire: Neo-Assyrian Palaces and the Creation of Courtly Culture.Melanie Groß & David Kertai - 2019 - Journal of Ancient History 7 (1):1-31.
    Assyria can be described as the founder of the imperial model of kingship in the ancient Near East. The Assyrian court itself, however, remains poorly understood. Scholarship has treated the court as a disembodied, textual entity, separated from the physical spaces it occupied – namely, the palaces. At the same time, architectural analyses have examined the physical structures of the Assyrian palaces, without consideration for how these structures were connected to people’s lives and works. The palaces are often described as (...)
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  5. “The Most Sacred Society of the Pythagoreans:” Philosophers Forming Associations.Philip A. Harland - 2019 - Journal of Ancient History 7 (1):207-232.
    Scholarly use of the label “school” to describe groups of philosophers has sometimes led to a neglect of the ways in which such gatherings of philosophers could function as unofficial associations of recognizable types. Concerns to distance supposedly “secular” philosophers from any “religious” connection have fed into this image of the philosophical “school,” diverting attention away from other important dimensions of associative life among philosophers and other literate professionals, including involvement in honours for the gods and in commensal activities. Epigraphic (...)
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  6.  1
    Interpreting Funerary Inscriptions From the City of Rome.Jeremy McInerney - 2019 - Journal of Ancient History 7 (1):156-206.
    The thousands of funerary inscriptions from the city of Rome published in CIL VI are a rich source of demographic data but are also the subject of serious debate regarding the epigraphic habit of the Romans. Do the inscriptions represent a cross-section of Roman society or are they largely the creation of the lower classes? Fixing the milieu from which the inscriptions come is difficult, because the exact status of more than 50 % of the commemorating population is unstated. The (...)
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  7.  3
    The Power-Transition Crisis of the 160s–130s BCE and the Formation of the Parthian Empire.Nikolaus Leo Overtoom - 2019 - Journal of Ancient History 7 (1):111-155.
    Alexander the Great’s conquests ushered in the Hellenistic era throughout the ancient Mediterranean and Middle East. In this period, the Seleucids, one of most successful of the Successor dynasties, ruled over most of the Middle East at the height of their power. Yet two rising powers in the ancient world, Rome and Parthia, played a crucial role in the decline and eventual fall of the Seleucids. In a prior article, I argued that geopolitical developments around the Eastern Mediterranean in the (...)
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  8.  6
    A Divine Couple: Demeter Malophoros and Zeus Meilichios in Selinus.Allaire B. Stallsmith - 2019 - Journal of Ancient History 7 (1):62-110.
    This paper concerns a collection of rough-hewn flat stelae excavated from the precinct of Zeus Meilichios in Selinus, Sicily between 1915 and 1926, a majority with two heads or busts, one male and one female, carved at their tops. These crudely fashioned idols are unique in their iconography. They combine the flat inscribed Punic stela with the Greek figural tradition, with some indigenous features. Their meaning is totally obscure – especially since they lack any literary reference. No comparable monuments have (...)
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  9.  5
    “And in the Fourth Year Egypt Rebelled...” The Chronology of and Sources for Egypt’s Second Revolt.Uzume Z. Wijnsma - 2019 - Journal of Ancient History 7 (1):32-61.
    Scholars continue to give different dates for Egypt’s second revolt against the Persians: Classicists generally date the revolt to 487–485 or 487/486–485/484 BC; Egyptologists and historians of the Achaemenid Empire generally date it to 486–485/484; while some scholars date it to 486/485–485/484. Such chronological differences may sound small, but they have important consequences for the way the rebellion is understood. The purpose of the present article is therefore twofold: first, it aims to clarify what we can and cannot know about (...)
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