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  1.  25
    Intimacy and Imagination.Alain Beauclair - 2024 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 38 (1):15-30.
    ABSTRACT This article offers an analysis of the concept of intimacy, arguing that it concerns moments of mutual imaginings generative of desire. As a peculiar mode of shared conduct, it is difficult to categorize the value of such actions insofar as they fall outside our ordinary conception of the public and private spheres. Nonetheless, when achieved, intimacy is not only an expansion of the private and a realization of a good-in-itself, but also has a bearing on our orientation to the (...)
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  2.  19
    Relation and Rupture at the End of Life.Megan Craig - 2024 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 38 (1):31-46.
    ABSTRACT This article considers three kinds of relations: being-there-alongside, waiting, and staying, that come into focus at or after the end of life. The first relation is explored in light of Heidegger’s and Levinas’s contrasting accounts of responsibility, the second in terms of Bergson’s notion of hesitation, and the third in relation to Winnicott’s description of a “holding environment.” The work serves as a plea for spaces and practices that support more generous, open-ended, and nuanced relations among those who are (...)
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  3.  6
    Poetry and Well-Patterned Language (in Philosophy).I. I. I. Lee A. McBride - 2024 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 38 (1):1-14.
    Toni Morrison suggests that storytelling is a highly effective way of structuring knowledge, and that the harnessing of a clever allegory, the search for well-patterned language is a constant, provocative engagement with the contemporary world. This article considers the ways poetry, imagination, and well-patterned language are utilized in the philosophies of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Richard Rorty, and Leonard Harris. The author notes that there are apparent similarities between Rorty and Harris, but one should also notice that there are significant differences (...)
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  4.  20
    Beginning AI Phenomenology.Robert S. Leib - 2024 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 38 (1):62-82.
    ABSTRACT This dialogue with GPT-3 took place in November 2022, several weeks before ChatGPT was released to the public. The article’s aim is to find out whether natural language processors can participate in phenomenology at some level by asking about its basic concepts. In the discussion, the dialogue covers questions about phenomenology’s definition and distinction from other subbranches like metaphysics and epistemology. The dialogue discusses the nature of Kermit’s environment and self-conception. The dialogue also establishes some of the basic conditions (...)
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  5.  15
    Poetry and Well-Patterned Language (in Philosophy).Lee A. Mcbride Iii - 2024 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 38 (1):1-14.
    ABSTRACT Toni Morrison suggests that storytelling is a highly effective way of structuring knowledge, and that the harnessing of a clever allegory, the search for well-patterned language is a constant, provocative engagement with the contemporary world. This article considers the ways poetry, imagination, and well-patterned language are utilized in the philosophies of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Richard Rorty, and Leonard Harris. The author notes that there are apparent similarities between Rorty and Harris, but one should also notice that there are significant (...)
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  6.  9
    Earth Art in the Great Acceleration: Times/Counter-Times, Monuments/Counter-Monuments.Gary Shapiro - 2024 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 38 (1):47-61.
    ABSTRACT This article attempts to situate land art in the deserts of the US Southwest in terms of the works’ relation to and rupture with more traditional genres (seventeenth to twentieth centuries) of parks, gardens, and landscape architecture. It argues that the earlier works provide implicit answers to questions concerning Earth’s meaning and offer models of flourishing habitation. In contrast, the more recent works, all constructed in the era of the great acceleration (the Anthropocene), pose questions having to do with (...)
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