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  1.  2
    Disproportionate Impacts of Radiation Exposure on Women, Children, and Pregnancy: Taking Back our Narrative.Cynthia Folkers - 2021 - Journal of the History of Biology 54 (1):31-66.
    Narratives surrounding ionizing radiation have often minimized radioactivity’s impact on the health of human and non-human animals and the natural environment. Many Cold War research policies, practices, and interpretations drove nuclear technology forward by institutionally obscuring empirical evidence of radiation’s disproportionate and low-dose harm—a legacy we still confront. Women, children, and pregnancy development are particularly sensitive to exposure from radioactivity, suffering more damage per dose than adult males, even down to small doses, making low doses a cornerstone of concern. Evidence (...)
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  2. Connecting to the Living History of Radiation Exposure.Jacob Hamblin & Linda M. Richards - 2021 - Journal of the History of Biology 54 (1):1-6.
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  3.  1
    Let Chromosomes Speak: The Cytogenetics Project at the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission.Sumiko Hatakeyama - 2021 - Journal of the History of Biology 54 (1):107-126.
    Hibakusha are “witnesses” of the atomic bombings, not just in a standard sense but also in the instrumental sense. For medical and scientific experts, hibakusha are biological resources of unparalleled scientific value. Over the past seventy years, the hibakusha bodies have narrated what it means to be exposed to radiation. In this paper, I explore studies at the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission that examined hibakusha bodies as sites where risk could be read. I focus on a period from the mid-1950s (...)
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  4.  2
    Embracing Mystery: Radiation Risks and Popular Science Writing in the Early Cold War.David K. Hecht - 2021 - Journal of the History of Biology 54 (1):127-141.
    Narrative form is crucial to the understanding of science in popular culture. This is particularly true with subjects such as radiation, in which the technical details at hand are often remote from everyday experience—as well as contested or uncertain among experts. This article examines the narrative choices made by three popular texts that publicized radiation risks to the public during the Cold War: John Hersey's Hiroshima, David Bradley's No Place to Hide, and Ralph Lapp's The Voyage of the Lucky Dragon. (...)
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  5.  3
    Locating the Boundaries of the Nuclear North: Arctic Biology, Contaminated Caribou, and the Problem of the Threshold.Jonathan Luedee - 2021 - Journal of the History of Biology 54 (1):67-93.
    This essay is a historical–geographical account of how scientists and public health officials conceptualized and assessed northern radioactive exposures in the late 1950s and 1960s. The detection of radionuclides in caribou bodies in northern Canada both demonstrated the global reach of nuclear fallout and revealed the unevenness of toxic relations and radioactive exposures. Following the documentation of the lichen–caribou–human pathway of exposure, Canadian public health officials became increasingly concerned about the possibility of heightened radioactive exposures among Indigenous northerners. Between 1963 (...)
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  6.  4
    The Cosmology of Evidence: Suffering, Science, and Biological Witness After Three Mile Island.M. X. Mitchell - 2021 - Journal of the History of Biology 54 (1):7-29.
    The 1979 partial nuclear reactor meltdown at Three Mile Island was simultaneously hyper-visible and hidden from public view. It was the subject of non-stop media attention, but its causes and consequences required expert explanation. No fire or explosion marked the moment when insensible radionuclides escaped the facility. Yet, residents recalled a variety of troubling sights, sounds, odors, tastes, and sensations. Public distrust percolated in the interstices between government assertions that little radiation had escaped the facility and residents’ sense memories of (...)
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  7.  2
    Erika Lorraine Milam, Creatures of Cain: The Hunt for Human Nature in Cold War America, (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2019), 408 pp., 33 b/w illus., $29.95 Cloth, ISBN: 9780691181882. [REVIEW]Marianne Sommer - 2021 - Journal of the History of Biology 54 (1):143-145.
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  8.  1
    The Visual Politics of Maralinga: Experiences, (Re)presentations, and Vulnerabilities.N. A. J. Taylor - 2021 - Journal of the History of Biology 54 (1):95-106.
    Visual cultures are being increasingly discussed in the history of science literature, although relatively very little of that work concerns the nuclear age. In addition, within the discrete yet bourgeoning literature on global nuclear art and culture, Oceania is often overlooked despite its central role in the development of the American, British, and French nuclear weapon capabilities, as well as their associated colonial legacies. This article serves to redress both concerns by examining the visual politics of Maralinga in relation to (...)
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