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  1.  6
    Book Review: Sherrie Lyons, From Cells to Organisms: Re-envisioning Cell Theory: (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2020), 224 pp., 17 b&w illus., $39.95 Paper, ISBN: 978–1-4426–3509-8; $71.25 Cloth, ISBN: 978–1-4426–3510-4. [REVIEW]Garland E. Allen - 2022 - Journal of the History of Biology 55 (1):181-184.
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  2.  6
    Dogs for Life: Beagles, Drugs, and Capital in the Twentieth Century.Brad Bolman - 2022 - Journal of the History of Biology 55 (1):147-179.
    This article tracks the transformation of beagle dogs from a common breed in mid-twentieth century American laboratories to the de jure standard in global toxicological research by the turn of the twenty-first. The breed was dispersed widely due to the expanding use of dogs in pharmacology in the 1950s and a worldwide crisis around pharmaceutical safety following the thalidomide scandal of the 1960s. Nevertheless, debates continued for decades over the beagle’s value as a model of carcinogenicity, even as the dogs (...)
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  3.  1
    Introduction: What Right? Which Organisms? Why Jobs?Brad Bolman - 2022 - Journal of the History of Biology 55 (1):3-13.
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  4.  3
    Model Organisms Unbound.Angela N. H. Creager - 2022 - Journal of the History of Biology 55 (1):21-28.
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  5.  6
    Correction to: An Origin of Citations: Darwin’s Collaborators and Their Contributions to the Origin of Species.Pedro de Lima Navarro & Cristina de Amorim Machado - 2022 - Journal of the History of Biology 55 (1):205-206.
    A correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10739-021-09640-x.
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  6.  3
    A Conversation with Darwin on Man Revisited: 150 Years to The Descent of Man.Oren Harman - 2022 - Journal of the History of Biology 55 (1):185-201.
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  7.  12
    Correction To: Method as a Function of “Disciplinary Landscape”: C.D. Darlington and Cytology, Genetics and Evolution, 1932–1950.Oren Soloman Harman - 2022 - Journal of the History of Biology 55 (1):203-203.
    It has come to my attention that a number of formulations in the section “Disciplinary Landscape: Cytology and Genetics” of my article “Method as a Function of Disciplinary Landscape: C.D. Darlington and the History of Cytology 1925–1950,” Journal of the History of Biology, 39, 2006, pp. 165–197, do not provide due credit to a source. While Franz Schrader, “Three Quarter Centuries of Cytology,” Science 107 : 155–159, is cited in the article, his reminiscences and analysis of the historical development of (...)
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  8.  4
    Lords of the Fly Revisited.Robert Kohler - 2022 - Journal of the History of Biology 55 (1):15-19.
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  9.  1
    International Culture Collections and the Value of Microbial Life: Johanna Westerdijk’s Fungi and Ernst Georg Pringsheim’s Algae.Charles A. Kollmer - 2022 - Journal of the History of Biology 55 (1):59-87.
    Around the turn of the twentieth century, microbiologists in Western Europe and North America began to organize centralized collections of microbial cultures. Collectors published lists of the strains they cultured, offering to send duplicates to colleagues near and far. This essay explores the history of microbial culture collections through two cases: Johanna Westerdijk’s collection of phytopathogenic fungi in the Netherlands and Ernst Georg Pringsheim’s collection of single-celled algae at the German University in Prague. Historians of science have tended to look (...)
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  10.  3
    Correction to: Ziying and Woods Hole: Bringing the Marine Biological Laboratory to Amoy, China, 1930–1936.Christine Y. L. Luk - 2022 - Journal of the History of Biology 55 (1):207-207.
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  11. Reflections on Making Mice.Karen A. Rader - 2022 - Journal of the History of Biology 55 (1):29-33.
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  12. 2022 Everett Mendelsohn Prize.Karen Rader & Marsha Richmond - 2022 - Journal of the History of Biology 55 (1):1-2.
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  13.  4
    From Monsters to Malformations: Anatomical Preparations as Objects of Evidence for a Developmental Paradigm of Embryology, 1770–1850.Sara Ray - 2022 - Journal of the History of Biology 55 (1):35-57.
    A common object found within medical museums is the developmental series: an arrangement of embryos depicting the transformation of an unremarkable blob into an anatomically organized and recognizable organism. The developmental series depicts a normative process, one where bodies emerge in reliable sequential stages to reveal anatomically perfect beings. Yet a century before the developmental series would become a visual model of embryological development, the very process of development itself was discerned through the comparative study of preserved human fetuses—specifically, those (...)
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  14.  3
    Between Simians and Cell Lines: Rhesus Monkeys, Polio Research, and the Geopolitics of Tissue Culture.Tara Suri - 2022 - Journal of the History of Biology 55 (1):115-146.
    This essay argues that the racialized geopolitics of the rhesus monkey trade conditioned the trajectory of tissue culture in polio research. Rhesus monkeys from north India were important experimental organisms in the American “war against polio” between the 1930s and 1950s. During this period, the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis expended considerable effort to secure the nonhuman primate for researchers’ changing experimental agendas. The NFIP drew on transnational networks to export hundreds of thousands of rhesus monkeys from colonial and later (...)
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  15.  1
    The Business with “Bugs”: Ruminology and the Commercial Feed Industry in the United States.Nicole Welk-Joerger - 2022 - Journal of the History of Biology 55 (1):89-113.
    Experimental cattle aided agricultural scientists throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in their efforts to produce beef and milk more efficiently for the growing human populations of the United States. Feed experiments were especially important for understanding how and what cattle needed to eat to better produce this food. However, as experts dedicated their time toward creating the most “economical” rations, their organism of focus shifted. This essay describes how scientific efforts to understand feed conversion in livestock became increasingly focused (...)
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