Year:

  1.  10
    David P. D. Munns, Engineering the Environment: Phytotrons and the Quest for Climate Control in the Cold War , 360 pp., 38 b&w illus., $49.95 Hardcover, ISBN 9780822944744. [REVIEW]Dominic J. Berry - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (1):203-205.
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  2.  4
    Between Social and Biological Heredity: Cope and Baldwin on Evolution, Inheritance, and Mind.David Ceccarelli - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (1):161-194.
    In the years of the post-Darwinian debate, many American naturalists invoked the name of Lamarck to signal their belief in a purposive and anti-Darwinian view of evolution. Yet Weismann’s theory of germ-plasm continuity undermined the shared tenet of the neo-Lamarckian theories as well as the idea of the interchangeability between biological and social heredity. Edward Drinker Cope, the leader of the so-called “American School,” defended his neo-Lamarckian philosophy against every attempt to redefine the relationship between behavior, development, and heredity beyond (...)
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  3.  7
    María Jesús Santesmases. The Circulation of Penicillin in Spain: Health, Wealth and Authority , XI, 239 pp., 8 b/w 1 color illus., $99.99 Hardcover, ISBN: 978-3-319-69717-8. [REVIEW]Angela N. H. Creager - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (1):199-201.
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  4.  2
    Seed and Kuêma in Aristotle’s Generation of Animals.Ignacio De Ribera-Martin - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (1):87-124.
    There are two different notions of seed at work in the Generation of Animals: seed as the spermatic residue, which concerns only the male and the female generative contributions, and seed as the kuêma and first mixture of the two generative contributions. The latter is a notion of seed common to plants and animals. The passage in GA I.18, 724b12–22 where Aristotle distinguishes between these two notions of seed has been mistakenly discredited as inauthentic or simply as irrelevant for understanding (...)
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  5.  4
    Lamarckism by Other Means: Interpreting Pavlov’s Conditioned Reflexes in Twentieth-Century Britain.Oliver Hill-Andrews - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (1):3-43.
    This essay examines the reception of Ivan Pavlov’s work on conditioned reflexes in early to mid-twentieth century Britain. Recent work on the political interpretation of biology has shown that the nineteenth-century strategy of “making socialists” was undermined by August Weismann’s attacks on the inheritance of acquired characters. I argue that Pavlov’s research reinvigorated socialist hopes of transforming society and the people in it. I highlight the work of Pavlov’s interpreters, notably the scientific journalist J. G. Crowther, the biologist Lancelot Hogben, (...)
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  6.  11
    Charles Darwin, Richard Owen, and Natural Selection: A Question of Priority.Curtis N. Johnson - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (1):45-85.
    No single author presented Darwin with a more difficult question about his priority in discovering natural selection than the British comparative anatomist and paleontologist Richard Owen. Owen was arguably the most influential biologist in Great Britain in Darwin’s time. Darwin wanted his approbation for what he believed to be his own theory of natural selection. Unfortunately for Darwin, when Owen first commented in publication about Darwin’s theory of descent he was openly hostile. Darwin was taken off-guard. In private meetings and (...)
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  7.  2
    Sara Kenney and John Watkiss, Surgeon X, Vol. 1–6: The Path of Most Resistance , 218 pp., $14.99, ISBN-10: 1534301542. [REVIEW]Cristina Moreno Lozano - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (1):219-222.
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  8.  5
    The Domestication of Animals and the Roots of the Anthropocene.William T. Lynch - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (1):209-217.
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  9.  6
    Domenico Bertoloni Meli, Visualizing Disease: The Art and History of Pathological Illustration , 288 pp., 36 color plates, 36 halftones, $55.00 Cloth, ISBN: 978226110295. [REVIEW]Rebecca Messbarger - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (1):207-208.
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  10.  75
    Michel Anctil, Luminous Creatures: The History and Science of Light Production in Living Organisms , 486 pp., 56 photos, C$ 49.95 Cloth, ISBN: 9780773553125. [REVIEW]Samantha Muka - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (1):195-197.
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  11. How Seeing Became Knowing: The Role of the Electron Microscope in Shaping the Modern Definition of Viruses.Neeraja Sankaran & Ton Helvoort - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (1):125-160.
    This paper examines the vital role played by electron microscopy toward the modern definition of viruses, as formulated in the late 1950s. Before the 1930s viruses could neither be visualized by available technologies nor grown in artificial media. As such they were usually identified by their ability to cause diseases in their hosts and defined in such negative terms as “ultramicroscopic” or invisible infectious agents that could not be cultivated outside living cells. The invention of the electron microscope, with magnification (...)
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  12.  8
    How Seeing Became Knowing: The Role of the Electron Microscope in Shaping the Modern Definition of Viruses.Ton van Helvoort & Neeraja Sankaran - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (1):125-160.
    This paper examines the vital role played by electron microscopy toward the modern definition of viruses, as formulated in the late 1950s. Before the 1930s viruses could neither be visualized by available technologies nor grown in artificial media. As such they were usually identified by their ability to cause diseases in their hosts and defined in such negative terms as “ultramicroscopic” or invisible infectious agents that could not be cultivated outside living cells. The invention of the electron microscope, with magnification (...)
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