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  1.  6
    Translation as Painting: The Ut Pictura Metaphor in Leonardo Bruni’s De interpretatione recta.Gaston J. Basile - 2021 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 84 (1):33-53.
    Leonardo Bruni’s De intepretatione recta has recently produced a growing body of literature which has improved our knowledge of the genesis, background and content of the work, as well as its pivotal role in the early history of translation and the humanist intellectual agenda. This article focuses on the conceptual metaphor which shapes Bruni’s understanding of the art of translation: the ‘Translation as Painting’ model. Drawing on a theoretical framework which stresses the cognitive value of metaphors, this article highlights the (...)
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  2.  1
    The Humanist Pompeo Pazzaglia: An Unknown Renaissance Poet.Tobias Daniels - 2021 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 84 (1):55-95.
    This article introduces the little-known humanist Pompeo Pazzaglia of Bologna. Drawing on the evidence of two collections of his works preserved in miscellaneous manuscripts, it not only reconstructs his biography, but also showcases a selection of his Neo-Latin poems, published and translated here for the first time. Moreover, it publishes some letters and writings which provide new information about book history as well as social, cultural and political events in mid-fifteenth-century Italy, especially in the ambit of Pomponio Leto’s Roman Academy, (...)
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  3.  1
    Henry Sike (1668–1712), a German Orientalist in Holland and England.Alastair Hamilton - 2021 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 84 (1):207-241.
    Heinrich Siecke, who Anglicised his name to Henry Sike, was regarded in Northern Europe as one of the most promising scholars of his day. Born in the reformed city of Bremen in 1668, he studied at...
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  4.  1
    A Transalpine Motif in Counter-Reformation Italy: Animal Analogies with the Ages of Man and Cristofano Bertelli’s Steps of Life.Sara F. Matthews-Grieco - 2021 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 84 (1):123-165.
    Cristofano Bertelli’s companion broadsheets, printed in Modena in the 1560s, represent a failed attempt to introduce a new iconographic theme to the Italian print market. Contrary to the vibrant success of transalpine prints representing the Steps of Life with animal analogies, Bertelli’s initiative did not stimulate Italian visual culture to produce the multiple copies, imitations and derivations long enjoyed by this motif in areas north of the Alps. The only other, comparable images to appear in the peninsula in the course (...)
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  5.  1
    Jean Gagnier’s De vita, et rebus gestis Mohammedis: Reading and Misreading the History of Islam in the Eighteenth Century.Simon Mills - 2021 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 84 (1):167-206.
    Jean Gagnier’s De vita, et rebus gestis Mohammedis was the first substantial biography of the Prophet Muhammad translated by a European author directly from an authentic Muslim source. Familiar to Edward Gibbon and Voltaire, Gagnier’s work significantly shaped European understandings of the origins of Islam well into the nineteenth century. Yet Gagnier’s scholarship has not been examined in any depth since it was closely read by his contemporaries. This article provides an analysis of Gagnier’s strategies and competencies as a translator (...)
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  6.  3
    God’s City: ‘Civic Humanism’ and the Self-Construction of the Ecclesia in Late Fifteenth- and Early Sixteenth-Century England.David Rundle - 2021 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 84 (1):97-121.
    This article considers one element within the long tradition of the church’s self-identification as a city. It focuses on England, c. 1450 to c. 1510, and considers how the civic rhetoric developed by Italian humanists, pre-eminently Leonardo Bruni, was refracted through an ecclesiastical lens and so appropriated for English clerical use. It describes how two useful elements were quarried from recent writings imported from Italy: the first was the emphasis on the city and its buildings as a locus of virtue; (...)
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  7.  4
    Shifting Paradigms: Ideas, Materiality and the Changing Shape of Grammar in the Renaissance.Ray Schrire - 2021 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 84 (1):1-31.
    What is the meaning of historical changes to the visualisation of knowledge? This article examines the long history of the Latin grammar from antiquity until early modernity and traces shifts in graphics through hundreds of manuscripts and printed books. It shows how the table—today the most common means for representation of grammatical paradigms—only became a common feature of grammar books in the Renaissance. To account for this visual change requires teasing apart the effects of intellectual from material factors on one (...)
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  8.  1
    Giambattista Vico, Eugene of Savoy and Hugo Grotius’s De jure belli ac pacis, 1719.Felix Waldmann - 2021 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 84 (1):243-284.
    The following article discusses an edition of Hugo Grotius’s De jure belli ac pacis, issued without a place of publication or publisher in 1719. The article focuses on the claim first advanc...
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