Linguistics and Philosophy

ISSNs: 0165-0157, 1573-0549

7 found

View year:

  1.  25
    Demonstratives, context-sensitivity, and coherence.Michael Devitt - 2024 - Linguistics and Philosophy 47 (2):317-339.
    Una Stojnić urges the radical view that the meaning of context-sensitive language is not “partially determined by non-linguistic features of utterance situation”, as traditionally thought, but rather “is determined entirely by grammar—by rules of language that have largely been missed”. The missed rules are ones of discourse coherence. The paper argues against this radical view as it applies to demonstrations, demonstratives, and the indexical ‘I’. Stojnić’s theories of demon-strations and demonstratives are found to be seriously incomplete, failing to meet the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  64
    Absolute gradable adjectives and loose talk.Alexander Dinges - 2024 - Linguistics and Philosophy 47 (2):341-360.
    Kennedy (Linguist Philos 30:1–45, 2007) forcefully proposes what is now a widely assumed semantics for absolute gradable adjectives. On this semantics, maximum standard adjectives like “straight” and “dry” ascribe a maximal degree of the underlying quantity. Meanwhile, minimum standard adjectives like “bent” and “wet” merely ascribe a non-zero, non-minimal degree of the underlying quantity. This theory clashes with the ordinary intuition that sentences like “The stick is straight” are frequently true while sentences like “The stick is bent” are frequently informative, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  16
    Intention reports and eventuality abstraction in a theory of mood choice.Thomas Grano - 2024 - Linguistics and Philosophy 47 (2):265-315.
    Recent work on mood choice considers fine-grained semantic differences among desire predicates (notably, ‘want’ and ‘hope’) and their consequences for the distribution of indicative and subjunctive complement clauses. In that vein, this paper takes a close look at ‘intend’. I show that cross-linguistically, ‘intend’ accepts nonfinite and subjunctive complements and rejects indicative complements. This fact poses difficulties for recent approaches to mood choice. Toward a solution, a broad aim of this paper is to argue that—while ‘intend’ is loosely in the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  40
    Representing multiply de re epistemic modal statements.Cem Şişkolar - 2024 - Linguistics and Philosophy 47 (2):211-237.
    I review Ninan’s Hundred Tickets case pertaining to quantification into epistemic modal contexts, and his counterpart theoretic way to address it (Ninan, Philos Rev, 2018). Ninan’s solution employs a ‘counterpart relation’ parameter intended to reflect how the domain of quantification is thought of in a context. This approach theoretically rules out the possibility of contexts where different ways of thinking about the domain can be deployed through different quantificational noun phrases. I bring out the case of the multiply de re (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  11
    Unattainable duties.Pablo Fuentes - 2024 - Linguistics and Philosophy 47 (1):1-36.
    Despite its somewhat marginal occurrence, unattainability has been acknowledged as a genuine problematic element for the semantic analysis of modal constructions, particularly for those expressing desires (Heim in J Semant 9(3):183–221, 1992; Portner in Nat Lang Semant 5(2):167–211, 1997). However, considerably less attention has been given to unattainable duties. In this article, I suggest that just as worlds that are deemed desirable are not necessarily linked to worlds considered candidates for actuality, some circumstantial arrangements allow for obligational expressions the semantics (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  27
    Language games and their types.Jonathan Ginzburg & Kwong-Cheong Wong - 2024 - Linguistics and Philosophy 47 (1):149-189.
    One of the success stories of formal semantics is explicating responsive moves like answers to questions. There is, however, a significant lacune concerning the characterization of _initiating utterances_, which are strongly tied to the conversational activity [language game (Wittgenstein), speech genre (Bakhtin)], or—our terminology—_conversational type_, one is engaged in. To date there has been no systematic proposal trying to account for the range of possible _language games_/_speech genres_/_conversational types_ and their global structure. In particular, concerning the range of subject matter (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  17
    Iconic Syntax: sign language classifier predicates and gesture sequences.Philippe Schlenker, Marion Bonnet, Jonathan Lamberton, Jason Lamberton, Emmanuel Chemla, Mirko Santoro & Carlo Geraci - 2024 - Linguistics and Philosophy 47 (1):77-147.
    We argue that the pictorial nature of certain constructions in signs and in gestures explains surprising properties of their syntax. In several sign languages, the standard word order (e.g. SVO) gets turned into SOV (with preverbal arguments) when the predicate is a classifier, a distinguished construction with highly iconic properties (e.g. Pavlič, 2016). In silent gestures, participants also prefer an SOV order in extensional constructions, irrespective of the word order of the language they speak (Goldin-Meadow et al., 2008). But in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues