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  1. Implications of Smart Decision-Making and Heuristics for Production Theory and Material Welfare.Morris Altman - 2019 - Mind and Society 18 (2):167-179.
    Conventional theory assumes that economic agents perform at optimal levels of efficiency by definition and this is achieved when individuals behave in a particular fashion. Moreover, neoclassical production theory masks the process by which optimal output can be achieved. I argue that economic theory should be revised to incorporate some key findings of behavioural economics, while retaining the conventional theory’s normative ideal of optimum output whilst rejecting its normative procedural ideals of how to achieve optimality in production. I argue that (...)
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  2.  3
    Heuristics as Tales From the Field: The Problem of Scope.Simone Guercini - 2019 - Mind and Society 18 (2):191-205.
    The scope of a heuristic decision making rule is a product of its fit to the context, the extension to which a heuristic can be applied successfully. To achieve effective outcomes, decision makers may use a few heuristics with large scopes or many with narrow scopes. Through a directed review of the literature combined with ethnographic research, this paper contributes to the debate on the problem of scope in three types of heuristics, namely, multipliers, thresholds, and calends. The scope of (...)
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  3.  4
    Business Education: Does a Focus on Prosocial Values Increase Students’ Pro-Social Behavior?Malte Petersen, Monika Keller, Jürgen Weibler & Wasilios Hariskos - 2019 - Mind and Society 18 (2):181-190.
    Prior research has shown a pronounced self-orientation in students of business and economics. This article examines if self-orientation can be alleviated by a focus on prosocial values in business education. In a cross-sectional design, we test the prosocial behavior and values of bachelor students at the beginning and the end of a traditional 3-year business administration program. We compare their behavior with the behavior of two different groups: students from an ethically-oriented international management school and students from a social work (...)
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  4. A Behavioral Approach to Economic Analysis.Hugh Schwartz - 2019 - Mind and Society 18 (2):139-142.
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  5.  3
    Architecture of the Mind and Libertarian Paternalism: Is the Reversibility of System 1 Nudges Likely to Happen?Riccardo Viale - 2019 - Mind and Society 18 (2):143-166.
    The libertarian attribute of Thaler and Sunstein’s nudge theory is one of the most important features for its candidature as a new model for public policy-making. It relies on the reversibility of choices made under the influence of nudging. Since the mind is articulated into two systems, the choice taken by System 1 is always reversible because it can be overridden by the deliberative and corrective role of System 2. This article does not aim to criticise the whole theory of (...)
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  6.  10
    Are Measures of Life Satisfaction Linked to Admiration for Celebrities?Mara S. Aruguete, Ho Huynh, Lynn E. McCutcheon, Blaine L. Browne, Bethany Jurs & Emilia Flint - 2019 - Mind and Society 18 (1):1-11.
    A pattern of research findings indicates that excessive devotion to a favorite celebrity is linked to attitudes and behaviors that are psychologically unhealthy and may predict low life satisfaction. This study examines whether four common measures of life satisfaction predict admiration for celebrities in two university samples and one community sample of young adults. Our results showed significant correlations between celebrity admiration and two measures of life satisfaction. We also found that the predictors of life satisfaction correlate with each other (...)
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  7.  13
    Brexit Behaviourally: Lessons Learned From the 2016 Referendum.Tessa Buchanan - 2019 - Mind and Society 18 (1):13-31.
    Nobel Prize winner Richard Thaler was among those who expected Remain to win the EU referendum. Yet on 23 June 2016, a majority in the UK voted to Leave by a margin of 52–48%. A study of over 450 Leave voters, based on the MINDSPACE framework, looks at whether behavioural factors affected the outcome and at what lessons could be learned for any future votes. It finds that voters had low levels of knowledge which may have undermined any ‘status quo (...)
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  8.  11
    Meta-Moral Cognition: An Introduction.Reena Cheruvalath - 2019 - Mind and Society 18 (1):33-42.
    This paper examines the literature on meta-moral cognition and juxtaposes that with meta-cognition. At a basic level, the moral agent coordinates and assigns meaning to the various micro-concepts and moral concepts involved in a moral judgment. These concepts are combined to make moral assumptions. Meta-moral cognition is a higher level cognitive skill. The skill helps the moral agent to understand the cognitive process, control it, regulate the concepts and strategies used, and helps to reflect on the right and wrong of (...)
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  9.  9
    Rationality in a Fatalistic World: Explaining Revolutionary Apathy in Pre-Soviet Peasants.Jessica Howell, Flagler College & Nikolai G. Wenzel - 2019 - Mind and Society 18 (1):125-137.
    This paper studies the attempts of Russian revolutionaries to mobilize the peasantry in the decade leading to the Soviet revolution of 1917. Peasants, who had been emancipated from serfdom only four decades earlier, in 1861, were still largely propertyless and poor. This would, at first glance, make them a ripe target for revolutionary activity. But peasants were largely refractory. We explain this lack of revolutionary spirit through two models. First, despite their lack of education and political awareness, the peasants were (...)
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  10.  7
    Scientific Discovery, Causal Explanation, and Process Model Induction.Pat Langley - 2019 - Mind and Society 18 (1):43-56.
    In this paper, I review two related lines of computational research: discovery of scientific knowledge and causal models of scientific phenomena. I also report research on quantitative process models that falls at the intersection of these two themes. This framework represents models as a set of interacting processes, each with associated differential equations that express influences among variables. Simulating such a quantitative process model produces trajectories for variables over time that one can compare to observations. Background knowledge about candidate processes (...)
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  11.  3
    The Role of the Brand on Choice Overload.Raffaella Misuraca, Francesco Ceresia, Ursina Teuscher & Palmira Faraci - 2019 - Mind and Society 18 (1):57-76.
    Current research on choice overload has been mainly conducted with choice options not associated with specific brands. This study investigates whether the presence of brand names in the choice set affects the occurrence of choice overload. Across four studies, we find that when choosing among an overabundance of alternatives, participants express more positive feelings when all the options of the choice set are associated with familiar brands, rather than unfamiliar brands or no brand at all. We also find that choice (...)
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  12.  7
    Inconsistency is Not Pathological: A Pragmatic Perspective.Mario J. Rizzo - 2019 - Mind and Society 18 (1):77-85.
    Both behavioral and standard neoclassical economists place a heavy emphasis on the consistency of preferences. In particular, transitive preferences are considered a desideratum. This paper attempts to show that consistency at the level of individual choice may be pragmatically irrelevant. Consistently following an environmentally adapted rule can result in intransitive preferences without negative consequences for individual or social goals. I give three examples of this. Social scientists should look at intransitivity of choices as a challenge to offer better explanations rather (...)
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  13.  9
    The Quantum-Like Approach to Modeling Classical Rationality Violations: An Introduction.Franco Vaio - 2019 - Mind and Society 18 (1):105-123.
    Psychological empirical research has shown that human choice behavior often violates the assumptions of classical rational choice models. In the last few decades a new research field has emerged which aims to account for the observed choice behavior by resorting to the concepts and mathematical techniques developed in the realm of quantum physics, such as the “mental state vector” defined in a Hilbert space and the interference of quantum probability. This article is a short introduction to the quantum-like approach to (...)
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  14.  8
    Is Irrational Thinking Associated with Lower Earnings and Happiness?Shoko Yamane, Hiroyasu Yoneda & Yoshiro Tsutsui - 2019 - Mind and Society 18 (1):87-104.
    This study investigates the individual outcomes of irrational thinking, including belief in the paranormal and non-scientific thinking. These modes of thinking are identified through factor analysis of eleven questions asked in a large-scale survey conducted in Japan in 2008. Income and happiness are used as measures of individual performance. We propose two hypotheses. Previous studies in finance lead us to consider Hypothesis 1 that both higher belief in the paranormal and non-scientific thinking are associated with lower income. Literature on the (...)
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