22 found

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  1.  2
    Understanding Technology, Changing the World.Christopher Coenen - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (3):203-209.
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  2.  1
    Precaution as a Risk in Data Gaps and Sustainable Nanotechnology Decision Support Systems: a Case Study of Nano-Enabled Textiles Production.Irini Furxhi, Finbarr Murphy, Craig A. Poland, Martin Cunneen & Martin Mullins - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (3):245-270.
    In light of the potential long-term societal and economic benefits of novel nano-enabled products, there is an evident need for research and development to focus on closing the gap in nano-materials safety. Concurrent reflection on the impact of decision-making tools, which may lack the capability to assist sophisticated judgements around the risks and benefits of the introduction of novel products, is essential. This paper addresses the potential for extant decision support tools to default to a precautionary principle position in the (...)
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  3.  1
    How Can I Contribute? Citizen Engagement in the Development of Nanotechnology for Health.Sikke R. Jansma, Anne M. Dijkstra & Menno D. T. de Jong - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (3):211-227.
    Scholars and policymakers have increasingly advocated to engage citizens more substantially in the development of science and technology. However, to a large extent it has remained unknown how citizens can contribute to technology development. In this study, we systematically characterized citizens’ contributions in the development of nanotechnology for health. We explored to which technology aspects citizens are able to provide suggestions on and on which values their suggestions are based. Fifty citizens in the Netherlands were asked to discuss different applications (...)
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  4.  1
    Responsible Innovation Definitions, Practices, and Motivations from Nanotechnology Researchers in Food and Agriculture.Adam E. Kokotovich, Jennifer Kuzma, Christopher L. Cummings & Khara Grieger - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (3):229-243.
    The growth of responsible innovation scholarship has been mirrored by a proliferation of RI definitions and practices, as well as a recognition of the importance of context for RI. This study investigates how researchers in the field of nanotechnology for food and agriculture define and practice RI, as well as what motivations they see for pursuing RI. We conducted 20 semi-structured interviews with nano-agrifood researchers from industry and academia in the USA, where we asked them to describe their RI definitions, (...)
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  5.  4
    Thoughts Unlocked by Technology—a Survey in Germany About Brain-Computer Interfaces.J. R. Schmid, O. Friedrich, S. Kessner & R. J. Jox - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (3):303-313.
    A brain-computer interface is a rapidly evolving neurotechnology connecting the human brain with a computer. In its classic form, brain activity is recorded and used to control external devices like protheses or wheelchairs. Thus, BCI users act with the power of their thoughts. While the initial development has focused on medical uses of BCIs, non-medical applications have recently been gaining more attention, for example in automobiles, airplanes, and the entertainment context. However, the attitudes of the general public towards BCIs have (...)
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  6.  3
    Neuroimages: Some Serving Suggestions.Benedict Charles Taylor-Green - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (3):315-319.
    This art-science interaction evokes two ‘neuroimages’. However, the term ‘neuroimage’ does not refer, as usual, to images that emerge from scientific practices that seek to gain insight into the structural and functional properties of brains. Rather, it is meant that the images considered have as their theme neurotechnologies: specifically, those that concern the control of neuroprostheses, and neuroprostheses themselves. The first neuroimage appears in a biosignal sensing cap catalogue, and the second appears in the science fiction film Blade Runner 2049. (...)
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  7.  3
    Responsibility through Anticipation? The ‘Future Talk’ and the Quest for Plausibility in the Governance of Emerging Technologies.Sergio Urueña - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (3):271-302.
    In anticipatory governance and responsible innovation, anticipation is a key theoretical and practical dimension for promoting a more responsible governance of new and emerging sciences and technologies. Yet, anticipation has been subjected to a range of criticisms, such that many now see it as unnecessary for AG and RI. According to Alfred Nordmann, practices engaging with ‘the future’, when performed under certain conditions, may reify the future, diminish our ability to see what is happening, and/or reproduce the illusion of control (...)
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  8.  2
    From Nano Backlash to Public Indifference: Some Reflections on French Public Dialogues on Nanotechnology.Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (2):191-201.
    The hype surrounding the emergence of nanotechnology proved extremely effective to raise public attention and controversies in the early 2000s. A proactive attitude prevailed resulting in the integration of social scientists upstream at the research level, research programs on Ethical, Legal and Societal Impacts, and various public engagement initiatives such as nanojury and citizen conferences. Twenty years later, what happened to the promises of SHS integration and public engagement in nanotechnology? Was it part of the hype, one of the many (...)
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  9.  3
    Safe by Design for Nanomaterials—Late Lessons from Early Warnings for Sustainable Innovation.Maurice Edward Brennan & Eugenia Valsami-Jones - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (2):99-103.
    The Safe by Design conceptual initiative being developed for nanomaterials offers a template for a new sustainable innovation approach for advanced materials with four important sustainability characteristics. Firstly, it requires potential toxicity risks to be evaluated earlier in the innovation cycle simultaneously with its chemical functionality and possible commercial applications. Secondly, it offers future options for reducing animal laboratory testing by early assessment using in silico predictive toxicological approaches, minimizing the number that reaches in vitro and in vivo trials. Thirdly, (...)
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  10.  1
    Content Analysis of Nano-news Published Between 2011 and 2018 in Turkish Newspapers.Şeyma Çalık, Ayşe Koç, Tuba Şenel Zor, Erhan Zor & Oktay Aslan - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (2):117-132.
    The aim of this study is to examine the distribution of news related to nanoscience and nanotechnology published in Turkish newspapers between 2011 and 2018. Nine Turkish newspapers selected using criterion sampling were investigated and the document analysis method was used to analyze them. The electronic archives of the newspapers were used to collect data and the word “nano” was used as a keyword. The obtained data were analyzed with the content analysis technique. While analyzing the news stories, categorization was (...)
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  11.  1
    International Handbook on Responsible Innovation — a Global Resource: René von Schomberg, Jonathan Hankins (eds.) 2019 (Cheltenham, Edward Elgar) ISBN: 9781784718855. 556 pp.Steffi Friedrichs - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (2):133-141.
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  12.  5
    European Legal Protection of Employees’ Health Working with Nanoparticles in the Context of the Christian Vision of Human Work.Maciej Jarota - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (2):105-115.
    The article analyses European regulations concerning the health protection at work with nanomaterials in the context of the Christian vision of human work. The increasingly widespread presence of nanotechnology in workplaces requires serious reflection on the adequacy of employers’ measures to protect workers’ health from the risks in the workplace. The lack of clear guidance in European legislation directly concerning work with nanoparticles is problematic. Moreover, the health consequences for workers using nanomaterials in the work process are not fully explored (...)
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  13.  3
    Traversing Technology Trajectories.Frederick Klaessig - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (2):149-168.
    Scholars in science and technology studies, as well as economics and innovation studies, utilize the trajectory metaphor in describing a technology’s maturation. Impetus and purpose may differ, but the trajectory serves as a shared tool for assessing social change either in society at large or within a market sector, a firm, or a discipline. In reverse, the lens of a technology trajectory can be a basis for assessing technology, estimating economic growth, and selecting among plausible product development pathways. Emerging technologies (...)
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  14.  4
    Juggling Roles, Experiencing Dilemmas: The Challenges of SSH Scholars in Public Engagement.Jantien Willemijn Schuijer, Jacqueline Broerse & Frank Kupper - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (2):169-189.
    The progressive introduction of emerging technologies, such as nanotechnology, has created a true testing ground for public engagement initiatives. Widespread experimentation has taken place with public and stakeholder dialogue and inclusive approaches to research and innovation more generally. Against this backdrop, Social Science and Humanities scholars have started to manifest themselves differently. They have taken on new roles in the public engagement field, including more practical and policy-oriented ones that seek to actively open the R&I system to wider public scrutiny. (...)
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  15.  4
    Hype After Hype: From Bio to Nano to AI.Franz Seifert & Camilo Fautz - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (2):143-148.
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  16.  3
    Who Cares for Agile Work? In/Visibilized Work Practices and Their Emancipatory Potential.Alev Coban & Klara-Aylin Wenten - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):57-70.
    The future of work has become a pressing matter of concern: Researchers, business consultancies, and industrial companies are intensively studying how new work models could be best implemented to increase workplace flexibility and creativity. In particular, the agile model has become one of the “must-have” elements for re-organizing work practices, especially for technology development work. However, the implementation of agile work often comes together with strong presumptions: it is regarded as an inevitable tool that can be universally integrated into different (...)
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  17.  7
    Towards Emancipatory Technology Studies.Philipp Frey, Simon Schaupp & Klara-Aylin Wenten - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):19-27.
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  18.  4
    Dialectics of Technical Emancipation—Considerations on a Reflexive, Sustainable Technology Development.Georg Jochum - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):29-41.
    The modern idea of emancipation is linked to the goal of overcoming dependencies and domination. However, as argued in the article, negative dialectics of emancipation must also be problematized. The project of emancipation, as it was formulated in the Age of Enlightenment, was often particular and was associated with the establishment of new forms of domination. Especially the project of liberation from the constraints of nature through technical development led to the domination of nature. In view of the ecological crisis, (...)
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  19.  6
    Technopolitics From Below: A Framework for the Analysis of Digital Politics of Production.Simon Schaupp - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):71-86.
    This article develops a multi-level framework for the analysis of a bottom-up politics of technology at the workplace. It draws on a multi-case study on algorithmic management of manual labor in manufacturing and delivery platforms in Germany. In researching how workers influenced the use of algorithmic management systems, the concept of technopolitics is developed to refer to three different arenas of negotiation: the arena of regulation, where institutional framings of technologies in production are negotiated, typically between state actors, employers’ associations, (...)
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  20.  10
    Citizen Science Fiction: The Potential of Situated Speculative Prototyping for Public Engagement on Emerging Technologies.Jantien W. Schuijer, Jacqueline E. W. Broerse & Frank Kupper - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):1-18.
    In response to calls for a research and innovation system that is more open to public scrutiny, we have seen a growth of formal and informal public engagement activities in the past decades. Nevertheless, critiques of several persistent routines in public engagement continue to resurface, in particular the focus on expert knowledge, cognitive exchange, risk discourse, and understandings of public opinion as being static. In an attempt to break out of these routines, we experimented with an innovative engagement format that (...)
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  21.  5
    The Three Pillars of Functional Autonomy of Hackers.Johan Söderberg & Maxigas - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):43-56.
    We propose a conceptual framework for analysing the relationship between social emancipation and alternative technology development. Key is the “functional autonomy” of the collective of users and developers of the technology vis-a-vis state and capital. We draw on previous empirical work about three hacker projects to substantiate the claim that the functional autonomy of hackers rests on three “pillars of autonomy”: technical skill, shared values, and collective memory. These three pillars sustain the autonomy of a community of hackers so that (...)
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  22.  5
    Towards a Digital Workerism: Workers’ Inquiry, Methods, and Technologies.Jamie Woodcock - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):87-98.
    Digital technology is playing an increasingly visible role in the organisation of many people’s work—as well as large parts of their lives more broadly. The concerns of emancipatory technology studies, or other critical accounts of technology, are often focused on finding alternative uses of technology. In many workplace contexts—from call centres to platform work—the imperatives of capital are deeply written into these technologies. Yet at the same time, many capitalist technologies are playing a key role facilitating emerging workers’ struggles. For (...)
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