14 found

Year:

  1. Textual Representation and Intertextuality of Graphene in Swedish Newspapers.Max Boholm - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (2):185-204.
    Textual representation of graphene in Sweden’s most circulated newspapers is analyzed in 229 articles from 2004 to 2018. What is and is not said about graphene is explored through systematically identifying the lexical and grammatical patterns of sentences using the word “graphene.” Graphene is said to be a super material with certain properties, to be an object of research, commercialization, and application, and to have societal significance. Given frequent classifications of graphene as a nanomaterial in scientific discourse, there is notably (...)
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  2.  3
    In Times of Crisis.Christopher Coenen - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (2):123-128.
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  3. Blueprint for the Development and Sustainability of National Nanosafety Centers.Neeraj Shandilya, Effie Marcoulaki, Sven Vercauteren, Hilda Witters, Eric Johansson Salazar-Sandoval, Anna-Kaisa Viitanen, Christophe Bressot & Wouter Fransman - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (2):169-183.
    This work presents a blueprint or set of guidelines for the planning and development of sustainable national centers dealing with the safety of nanomaterials and nanotechnologies toward public health and environment. The blueprint was developed following a methodological approach of EU-wide online survey and workshop with several stakeholders. The purpose was to identify the key elements and challenges in the development and sustainability of a national nanosafety center. The responses were received from representatives of 16 national nanosafety centers across Europe (...)
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  4.  10
    “I Don’T Want to Do Anything Bad.” Perspectives on Scientific Responsibility: Results From a Qualitative Interview Study with Senior Scientists.Sebastian Wäscher, Nikola Biller-Andorno & Anna Deplazes-Zemp - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (2):135-153.
    This paper presents scientists’ understanding of their roles in society and corresponding responsibilities. It discusses the researchers’ perspective against the background of the contemporary literature on scientific responsibility in the social sciences and philosophy and proposes a heuristic that improves the understanding of the complexity of scientific responsibility. The study is based on qualitative interviews with senior scientists. The presented results show what researchers themselves see as their responsibilities, how they assume them, and what challenges they perceive with respect to (...)
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  5.  7
    Is COVID-19 a Message from Nature?John Weckert - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (2):129-133.
    Claims have been made that the current COVID-19 pandemic is a message from nature to stop exploiting the earth to the extent that we have been. While there is no direct evidence that this pandemic is a result of human actions with respect to the earth, ample evidence exists that deforestation and other environmental changes, together with climate change, do make it more likely that viruses will cross from wildlife to humans. We humans are mammals and our welfare depends on (...)
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  6.  2
    Regulating Risk of Nanomaterials for Workers Through Soft Law Approach.Halila Faiza Zainal Abidin, Kamal Halili Hassan & Zinatul Ashiqin Zainol - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (2):155-167.
    Nanotechnology has revolutionized various industries and has become a notable catalyst for economic growth. The emerging issues of human health and safety associated with nanotechnology development have raised regulatory concerns worldwide. In occupational settings, the same novel characteristics of nanomaterials that are utilized for innovation may also be the source of toxins with adverse health effects for workers. The existing regulatory framework may function effectively to regulate chemical substances in their conventional forms but may not be adequate with regard to (...)
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  7.  5
    Noise and Synthetic Biology: How to Deal with Stochasticity?Miguel Prado Casanova - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (1):113-122.
    This paper explores the functional role of noise in synthetic biology and its relation to the concept of randomness. Ongoing developments in the field of synthetic biology are pursuing the re-organisation and control of biological components to make functional devices. This paper addresses the distinction between noise and randomness in reference to the functional relationships that each may play in the evolution of living and/or synthetic systems. The differentiation between noise and randomness in its constructive role, that is, between noise (...)
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  8.  13
    The Ethics and Ontology of Synthetic Biology: a Neo-Aristotelian Perspective.Lewis Coyne - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (1):43-55.
    This article is concerned with two interrelated questions: what, if anything, distinguishes synthetic from natural organisms, and to what extent, if any, creating the former is of moral significance. These are ontological and ethical questions, respectively. As the title indicates, I address both from a broadly neo-Aristotelian perspective, i.e. a teleological philosophy of life and virtue ethics. For brevity’s sake, I shall not argue for either philosophical position at length, but instead hope to demonstrate their legitimacy through their explanatory power. (...)
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  9. BrisSynBio Art-Science Dossier.Maria Fannin, Katy Connor, David Roden & Darian Meacham - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (1):27-41.
    Finding avenues for collaboration and engagement between the arts and the sciences was a central theme of investigation for the Responsible Research and Innovation and Public Engagement programme at BrisSynBio, a BBSRC/EPSRC Synthetic Biology Research Centre that is now part of the Bristol BioDesign Institute at University of Bristol. The reflections and experiments that appear in this dossier are a sample of these investigations and are contributed by Maria Fannin, Katy Connor and David Roden. Darian Meacham coordinated and introduces the (...)
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  10.  2
    Philosophy and Synthetic Biology: The BrisSynBio Experiment.Darian Meacham & Miguel Prado Casanova - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (1):21-25.
    This article provides an overview of the relation between synthetic biology and philosophy as understood from within the Ethics, Philosophy and Responsible Innovation programme of BrisSynBio (a BBSRC/EPSCR Synthetic Biology Research Centre). It also introduces the special issue of NanoEthics devoted to synthetic biology and philosophy.
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  11.  2
    Art-Science Collaboration in an EPSRC/BBSRC-Funded Synthetic Biology UK Research Centre.Michael Reinsborough - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (1):93-111.
    Here I examine the potential for art-science collaborations to be the basis for deliberative discussions on research agendas and direction. Responsible Research and Innovation has become a science policy goal in synthetic biology and several other high-profile areas of scientific research. While art-science collaborations offer the potential to engage both publics and scientists and thus possess the potential to facilitate the desired “mutual responsiveness” between researchers, institutional actors, publics and various stakeholders, there are potential challenges in effectively implementing collaborations as (...)
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  12.  10
    The Diversity of Engineering in Synthetic Biology.Massimiliano Simons - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (1):71-91.
    A recurrent theme in the characterization of synthetic biology is the role of engineering. This theme is widespread in the accounts of scholars studying this field and the biologists working in it, in those of the biologists themselves, as well as in policy documents. The aim of this article is to open this black-box of engineering that is supposed to influence and change contemporary life sciences. Too often, both synthetic biologists and their critics assume a very narrow understanding of what (...)
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  13.  3
    Generative Critique in Interdisciplinary Collaborations: From Critique in and of the Neurosciences to Socio-Technical Integration Research as a Practice of Critique in R(R)I.Mareike Smolka - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (1):1-19.
    Discourses on Responsible Innovation and Responsible Research and Innovation, in short RI, have revolved around but not elaborated on the notion of critique. In this article, generative critique is introduced to RI as a practice that sits in-between adversarial armchair critique and co-opted, uncritical service. How to position oneself and be positioned on this spectrum has puzzled humanities scholars and social scientists who engage in interdisciplinary collaborations with scientists, engineers, and other professionals. Recently, generative critique has been presented as a (...)
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  14.  6
    Living Machines: Metaphors We Live By.Nora S. Vaage - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (1):57-70.
    Within biology and in society, living creatures have long been described using metaphors of machinery and computation: ‘bioengineering’, ‘genes as code’ or ‘biological chassis’. This paper builds on Lakoff and Johnson’s argument that such language mechanisms shape how we understand the world. I argue that the living machines metaphor builds upon a certain perception of life entailing an idea of radical human control of the living world, looking back at the historical preconditions for this metaphor. I discuss how design is (...)
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