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  1.  2
    Colloquium 3 Commentary on Moore.Jesse Bailey - 2020 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 35 (1):98-102.
    This paper is a response to Christopher Moore’s excellent paper, “Questioning Aristotle’s Radical Account of Σωφροσύνη.” I expand upon some of the themes in the four suggestions Moore makes in his “Four Possible Defenses” of Aristotle that I take to be the most fruitful avenues of research. I then argue that pursuing these avenues will show that Aristotle’s thinking in the Nicomachean Ethics about σωφροσύνη—and virtues in general—cannot be understood by looking only at the early books. I argue that his (...)
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  2.  2
    Colloquium 2 Commentary on Pearson.Howard J. Curzer - 2020 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 35 (1):59-67.
    The Humean interpretation of Aristotle takes him to say that the goals of action are ultimately specified by desire. The Combo interpretation takes Aristotle to say that the goals of action are ultimately specified, sometimes by reason, other times by desire, and yet other times by both. I agree with Pearson that there are passages supporting each side and that the passages Pearson introduces into the debate support the Combo interpretation. To further support the Combo interpretation, I identify four features (...)
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  3.  1
    Colloquium 1 The Authorship of the Pseudo-Simplician Neoplatonic Commentary on the De Anima.Gary Gabor - 2020 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 35 (1):1-22.
    The traditional ascription of the Neoplatonic commentary on the De Anima to Sim­plicius has prominently been disputed by Carlos Steel and Fernand Bossier, along with J.O. Urmson and Francesco Piccolomini, among others. Citing problems with terminology, diction, cross-references, doctrine, and other features, these authors have argued that the commentary cannot have been composed by Simplicius and that Priscian of Lydia is a favored alternative. In this paper, I present some new arguments for why the traditional attribution to Simplicius is, in (...)
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  4.  4
    Colloquium 4 Mythological Sources of Oblivion and Memory.Diego S. Garrocho - 2020 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 35 (1):105-120.
    In this work, I present a selection of mythological and cultural insights from Ancient Greece that make our ambiguous relationship with memory and oblivion explicit. From Plato to Dante, or from Orphism to Nietzsche, and even today, the experiences of memory and forgetting appear as two sides of one essential nucleus in our cultural tradition in general and in the history of philosophy in particular. I intend to present a panoramic view of the main mythological sources that mention these two (...)
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  5.  6
    Colloquium 5 Final Causality Without Teleology in Aristotle’s Ontology of Life.Francisco J. Gonzalez - 2020 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 35 (1):133-172.
    The present paper has a negative aim and a positive aim, both limited in the present context to a sketch or outline. The negative aim, today less controversial, is to show that Aristotle’s theory of final causality has little or nothing to do with the teleology rejected by modern science and that, therefore, far from having been rendered obsolete, it has yet to be fully understood. This aim will be met through the identification and brief discussion of some key points (...)
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  6.  1
    Colloquium 5 Commentary on Gonzalez.Brian Julian - 2020 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 35 (1):173-177.
    This commentary argues that, in contrast to the view of Professor Gonzalez, Aristotle’s account of final causation is not very helpful for addressing contemporary concerns. Aristotle presents it as a type of cause, but, when one considers Aristotle’s distinction between facts and explanations, a final cause is better viewed as simply a fact. It is true that organisms show an internal directedness towards an end, but one can still ask why this is the case. Because of its limitations, Aristotle’s account (...)
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  7. Colloquium 1 Commentary on Gabor.Dana Miller - 2020 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 35 (1):23-27.
    This paper gives a brief discussion of the problem of ascribing authorship to ancient philosophical texts when there is evidence both for and against traditional ascription. The case in point is tradition’s claim that Simplicius is the author of the De Anima commentary. It is argued here that, while Gabor provides new and important methodological evidence for Simplicius’s authorship, we should not expect certainty. It is suggested that, in cases where historical fact may never be ascertained, we will be better (...)
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  8. Colloquium 3 Questioning Aristotle’s Radical Account of Σωφροσύνη.Christopher Moore - 2020 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 35 (1):73-97.
    This paper investigates Aristotle’s canonical analysis of σωφροσύνη in Nicomachean Ethics 3.10–12 against the background of earlier and subsequent uses, and analyses of the virtue term. It argues that Aristotle’s is an outlier, brilliant but factitious, created to fit a theoretical scheme rather than reflect Greek understanding. Aristotle obscures the creativity of his account, presenting it as an ordinary language conceptual clarification that it is not. Many contemporary readers accept Aristotle’s narrow theory—that σωφροσύνη is moderation with respect to those pleasures (...)
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  9.  6
    Colloquium 2 How to Argue About Aristotle About Practical Reason.Giles Pearson - 2020 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 35 (1):31-58.
    In this paper, I consider Aristotle’s views in relation to the Humean theory of motivation. I distinguish three principles which HTM is committed to: the ‘No Besires’ principle, the ‘Motivation Out—Desire In’ principle, and the ‘Desire Out—Desire In’ principle. To reject HTM, one only needs to reject one of these principles. I argue that while it is plausible to think that Aristotle accepts the first two principles, there are some grounds for thinking that he might reject the third.
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  10. Colloquium 4 Commentary on Garrocho.Santiago Ramos - 2020 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 35 (1):121-129.
    This commentary examines Diego Garrocho’s paper, “Mythological Sources of Memory and Oblivion.” I argue that Garrocho’s thesis hinges on the assumption that two historical continuities exist between myth and philosophy. First, it supposes a continuity of understanding: between the mythical conception of memory and oblivion, and the philosophical reformulation of the same, there lies no essential difference; both the mythical and philosophical traditions share a univocal, or at least analogical, concept of memory and oblivion. Second, it supposes a continuity of (...)
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