Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics

ISSNs: 2157-1732, 2157-1740

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  1.  7
    A Call to Duty; but Duty to Who? —: Voices of Healthcare Providers in Conflict Zones.Esime A. Agbloyor - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):181-185.
    Serving as a healthcare worker in a conflict zone is an experience that is characterized by peculiar and unimaginable challenges. This commentary is an exposition on twelve collated stories of healthcare providers currently serving or who have previously served in war. The stories bring to bear the heaviness of emotions such as fear and guilt that the authors grappled with, while concurrently showing that they embody virtues such as altruism, self-sacrifice, courage, and solidarity. In these stories, we see highlighted recurrent (...)
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  2.  9
    When a Conflict Collapses on a Child: An (Aborted) Medical Evacuation of a Hazara Toddler During the Kabul Airport Blast and the Taliban Takeover.Ayesha Ahmad - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):167-170.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:When a Conflict Collapses on a Child: An (Aborted) Medical Evacuation of a Hazara Toddler During the Kabul Airport Blast and the Taliban TakeoverAyesha AhmadI work in the capacity of an academic researching conflict in Afghanistan. My commitment is rooted in the firm terrain of friendships that merged into sisterhood of the Afghan terrain spaning decades of war but which is also the home of poetics and legacies that (...)
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  3.  7
    Soldiers of the Invisible Front: How Ukrainian Therapists Are Fighting for the Mental Health of the Nation Under Fire.Irina Deyneka & Eva Regel - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):4-5.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Soldiers of the Invisible Front: How Ukrainian Therapists Are Fighting for the Mental Health of the Nation Under FireIrina Deyneka and Eva RegelIrina DeynekaWhen the Russian army attacked my country, I became a volunteer for a hotline offering psychological support to those in crisis; refugees, those who were under the shelling, those who were hiding in bomb shelters, and who were directly in the zone of fighting. People were (...)
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  4.  4
    A Liberating Breath.Elizabeth Dotsenko - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):1-4.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:A Liberating BreathElizabeth DotsenkoFunding. Elizabeth Dotsenko, MD, is supported by the Loyola University Chicago–Ukrainian Catholic University Bioethics Fellowship Program, funded by the National Institutes of Health Fogarty International Center (D43TW011506).The war in Ukraine started not in 2022, but in 2014. Some of my relatives have been living under occupation for the past nine years. After a year of occupation, parts of Ukrainian society stopped paying attention.But on February 24th (...)
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  5.  4
    When Medical Ethics and Military Ethics Collide.Michael L. Gross - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):199-204.
    In 12 narratives, medical workers from Afghanistan, Darfur, Gaza, Iraq, Israel, Myanmar, and Ukraine describe the day-to-day challenges of providing quality medical care in austere conflict zones. Faced with severe shortages of supplies, overwhelmed by sick and injured civilians and soldiers, and subject to constant attacks on medical personnel and facilities, the contributors to this collection confront difficult dilemmas of justice, medical impartiality, neutrality, burnout, and moral injury as they struggle to fulfill their duties as medical professionals, military officers, and (...)
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  6.  9
    When Ethics Survives Where People Do Not: A Story From Darfur.Ghaiath Hussein - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):162-164.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:When Ethics Survives Where People Do Not: A Story From DarfurGhaiath HusseinI was not new to Darfur. I had been here before, although I wore a different hat as I literally walked under the burning April sun along the wide, dusty, unpaved streets of Nyala, South Darfur, to “headquarters.” It was to be another interesting, but normal, peaceful, and safe day as I led the Sudanese household survey in (...)
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  7.  6
    Why We Stay.Vladyslava Kachkovska, Iryna Dudchenko, Anna Kovchun & Lyudmyla Prystupa - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):158-160.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Why We StayVladyslava Kachkovska, Iryna Dudchenko, Anna Kovchun, and Lyudmyla PrystupaFunding. Vladyslava Kachkovska, MD, PhD is supported by the Loyola University Chicago– Ukrainian Catholic University Bioethics Fellowship Program, funded by the National Institutes of Health Fogarty International Center (D43TW011506).We are a group of physicians and professors in the Department of internal medicine at Sumy State University in Ukraine, located 20 miles from the border with Russia. We have been (...)
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  8.  5
    Parental Refusals of Blood Transfusions from COVID-19 Vaccinated Donors for Children Needing Cardiac Surgery.Daniel H. Kim, Emily Berkman, Jonna D. Clark, Nabiha H. Saifee, Douglas S. Diekema & Mithya Lewis-Newby - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):215-226.
    There is a growing trend of refusal of blood transfusions from COVID-19 vaccinated donors. We highlight three cases where parents have refused blood transfusions from COVID-19 vaccinated donors on behalf of their children in the setting of congenital cardiac surgery. These families have also requested accommodations such as explicit identification of blood from COVID-19 vaccinated donors, directed donation from a COVID-19 unvaccinated family member, or use of a non-standard blood supplier. We address the ethical challenges posed by these issues. We (...)
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  9.  13
    Burma’s Healthcare Under Fire: My Experience as an Exiled Medical Professional.P. P. Kyaw - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):164-167.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Burma’s Healthcare Under Fire: My Experience as an Exiled Medical ProfessionalP. P. KyawI used to work as a medical doctor in a less developed state than many big cities in Burma1 that experienced prolonged civil wars and current similar atrocities decades before the urban areas of the country experienced them. Before everything started, I was responsible for the medical management of the most vulnerable communities and had been struggling (...)
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  10.  9
    An Unsettling Affair.Zohar Lederman - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):152-153.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:An Unsettling AffairZohar LedermanAdults should not bury babies. Whenever that happens, you know something in the world has gone awry.Similarly to most Israeli Jews, I had to enlist in the military when I was 18. As part of my basic military training, I had to guard a certain settlement in the West Bank for two weeks. The drill was what we call “4–8”: four hours of guarding, eight hours (...)
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  11.  10
    Full Collection of Personal Narratives.Zohar Lederman, Ola Ziara, Rachel Coghlan, Oksana Sulaieva, Anna Shcherbakova, Oleksandr Dudin, Vladyslava Kachkovska, Iryna Dudchenko, Anna Kovchun, Lyudmyla Prystupa, Yuliya Nogovitsyna, Ghaiath Hussein, Kathryn Fausch, P. P. Kyaw, Ayesha Ahmad, I. I. Richard W. Sams, Handreen Mohammed Saeed, Artem Riga, Ryan C. Maves, Elizabeth Dotsenko, Irina Deyneka, Eva V. Regel & Vita Voloshchuk - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3).
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Full Collection of Personal NarrativesZohar Lederman, Ola Ziara, Rachel Coghlan, Oksana Sulaieva, Anna Shcherbakova, Oleksandr Dudin, Vladyslava Kachkovska, Iryna Dudchenko, Anna Kovchun, Lyudmyla Prystupa, Yuliya Nogovitsyna, Ghaiath Hussein, Kathryn Fausch, P. P. Kyaw, Ayesha Ahmad, Richard W Sams II, Handreen Mohammed Saeed, Artem Riga, Ryan C. Maves, Elizabeth Dotsenko, Irina Deyneka, Eva V. Regel, and Vita Voloshchuk• An Unsettling Affair• How We Keep Caring While Walking Through Our Pain• (...)
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  12.  3
    The Limits of Our Obligations.Ryan C. Maves - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):176-179.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Limits of Our ObligationsRyan C. MavesDisclaimers. No funding was utilized for this manuscript. Dr. Maves is a retired U.S. Navy officer, and the opinions contained herein are his own. The opinions in this manuscript do not reflect the official opinion of the Department of the Navy, Department of Defense, nor of the U.S. Government.In 2012, I was a commander in the United States Navy, deployed to the NATO (...)
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  13.  6
    Healthcare Workers in Conflict: Challenges and Choices.Melissa McRae & Maria Guevara - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):187-192.
    ‘War is definitely hell on earth’. All too often, we hope the hell will be short-lived, over in a few days, and yet, as we know from experience, hell can go on and on and on. For healthcare workers who provide care to victims of conflict, the work raises many ethical dilemmas. The stories showcased in this edition of NIB share the experiences of a handful of brave individuals and how they navigated their professional ethical obligations as well as their (...)
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  14.  5
    A Semi-Personal Story from a Ukrainian NGO Professional (or a Semi-Professional Story from a Ukrainian Person) Living through the War.Yuliya Nogovitsyna - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):160-162.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:A Semi-Personal Story from a Ukrainian NGO Professional (or a Semi-Professional Story from a Ukrainian Person) Living through the WarYuliya NogovitsynaI live in Kyiv with my husband and two daughters. On 24 February 2022, my husband woke me up at 5 am tapping me on the shoulder and saying, “Yulia, wake up. There are bombings outside. The war started”. [End Page 160]That day was our younger daughter’s birthday. She (...)
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  15.  6
    Healthcare Under Fire: Stories from Healthcare Workers During Armed Conflict.Dónal O'Mathúna, Thalia Arawi & Abdul Rahman Fares - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):147-151.
    This symposium includes twelve narratives from individuals or groups who have worked to help the sick and injured receive healthcare during armed conflict. Four commentaries on these narratives are also included, authored by experts and scholars in the fields of bioethics, human rights, sexual violence in armed conflict, the forced displacement of civilians, and policy development for resource constrained healthcare. The goal of this symposium is to call attention to the the difficulties and ethical dilemmas of providing healthcare during violent (...)
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  16.  6
    The Vagaries and Vicissitudes of War.I. I. Richard W. Sams - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):170-172.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Vagaries and Vicissitudes of WarRichard W Sams III remember standing in the kitchen of our home on Camp Pendleton—a United States Marine Corps base in Southern California—listening to National Public Radio (NPR) and doing dishes in the fall of 2002. President Bush announced to the world that he was considering a pre-emptive invasion of Iraq on the pretext of Saddam Hussein harboring weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Three (...)
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  17.  7
    One Surgeon’s Experience During Armed Conflict in Ukraine.Artem Riga - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):174-176.
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  18.  8
    Providing Care to a Potential Aggressor: An Ethical Dilemma.Handreen Mohammed Saeed - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):172-174.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Providing Care to a Potential Aggressor: An Ethical DilemmaHandreen Mohammed SaeedFollowing the abrupt fall of almost a third of its territory in 2014 to armed militias, Iraq fell into civil war turmoil. As a direct result of the armed conflicts, hundreds of thousands of Iraqis were displaced or subjected to atrocious human rights violations with physical, sexual, and psychosocial abuse. While the scenes on the TV provided only a (...)
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  19.  7
    Twelve Postcards from the Frontlines: Reflections From Healthcare Providers Operating in Armed Conflict.Kim Thuy Seelinger - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):193-197.
    Armed conflict can destroy both a healthcare system and the people who comprise it. Where the facilities themselves may take decades to rebuild, this collection of essays is evidence of the remarkable resilience of healthcare providers working in these conflict zones. Twelve narratives are shared by doctors, nurses, and other staff working in current crises in places such as Afghanistan, Darfur, Gaza, Iraq, Myanmar, Syria, and Ukraine. The essays reveal logistical, personal, and ethical challenges of providing fundamental healthcare services under.
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  20.  6
    Jehovah’s Witnesses and the Normative Function of Indirect Consent.Joanna Smolenski - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):205-213.
    In this case study, I consider Mr. A, a Jehovah’s Witness with chronic vertebral osteomyelitis in need of surgical debridement. Prior to proceeding to the OR, he was unwilling either to explicitly consent to or refuse blood transfusion, while indicating he was open to transfusion intraoperatively, if the team judged it necessary. Ethics was consulted to determine if it would be morally justifiable for the team to proceed with blood transfusion during the course of surgery without Mr. A’s documented consent (...)
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  21.  8
    Adjusting Laboratory Practices to the Challenges of Wartime.Oksana Sulaieva, Anna Shcherbakova & Oleksandr Dudin - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):155-158.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Adjusting Laboratory Practices to the Challenges of WartimeOksana Sulaieva, Anna Shcherbakova, and Oleksandr DudinFunding. Oksana Sulaieva, MD, PhD is supported by the Loyola University Chicago–Ukrainian Catholic University Bioethics Fellowship Program, funded by the National Institutes of Health Fogarty International Center (D43TW011506).After 500 days of the unjust war initiated by the Russians, we look back to reflect on the challenges our medical laboratory faced during these early days. On the (...)
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  22.  8
    Stories of Families with Chronically Ill Pediatric Patients during the War in Ukraine.Vita Voloshchuk - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):5-7.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Stories of Families with Chronically Ill Pediatric Patients during the War in UkraineVita VoloshchukFebruary 24th was a day that has left a mark in the memory and on the lives of every Ukrainian person. My husband and I work together [End Page E5] in a hospital. He had gone into work early to conduct a kidney transplant that had been scheduled for that day. Suddenly, whilst on my way (...)
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  23.  5
    How We Keep Caring While Walking Through Our Pain.Ola Ziara & Rachel Coghlan - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):153-155.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:How We Keep Caring While Walking Through Our PainOla Ziara and Rachel CoghlanAuthor Dedication. To my dear brother Omar Ziara, a bright doctor, entrepreneur, and community advocate who was killed in an Israeli bombing in November 2023.May your soul rest in peace and may your memory remain alive in our hearts. May your unborn child grow up to become the wonderful man that you were. Forever loved by all.Palestinian-American (...)
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  24.  12
    Our Baby, Whose Choice? Certainty, Ambivalence, and Belonging in Male Infant Circumcision.Lauren L. Baker - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):93-99.
    Routine infant circumcision is one of the most common surgical procedures performed in the U.S. Despite its broad societal acceptance, the practice is not without controversy. The stories included in this symposium offer rich insight into the diverse set of attitudes, values, and beliefs related to the practice of circumcision. They additionally offer insight into the complex web of personal, interpersonal, and social dynamics that inform the circumcision choices parents make for their children, the reasons parents make them, and how (...)
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  25.  7
    Physician Family Conflict Following Cardiac Arrest: A Qualitative Study.Rachel Caplan, Sachin Agarwal & Joyeeta G. Dastidar - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):129-137.
    Comatose survivors of cardiac arrest may die following withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy (WLST) due to poor neurologic prognosis. Family members, acting as surrogate decision makers, are frequently asked to decide whether the patient should continue to receive ongoing life-sustaining therapy such as mechanical ventilation in this context of risk of death following removal. Sometimes, physicians and family members disagree about what is in the patient's best interest, and this conflict causes distress for both families and medical personnel. This article examines (...)
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  26.  12
    Circumcision Stories: Enhancing our Understanding of Parental Perspectives in a Context of Controversy.Laura M. Carpenter - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):101-106.
    This commentary examines twelve stories in which parents recount how they (and often their co-parent) decided whether or not to circumcise their newborn sons. Several debated whether this should be their decision to make. The stories offer an intimate glimpse into people's efforts to do the best for children in a context of incomplete and changing information and intense public controversy. The commentary explores the diverse meanings and contradictory commonsense beliefs that surround foreskin removal in the United States today. Considering (...)
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  27.  12
    Ease of Care.Travis Cearley - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):79-81.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Ease of CareTravis CearleyRoughly nine years ago, I was deer hunting on a friend's property just outside of Canaan, Missouri, where he had graciously provided me access to one of his premier tree stands. It was early in bow season and even though the calendar had suggested it was Autumn, the weather mirrored a classic Missouri August morning, muggy and thick. Dressed in my lightest hunting gear, I had (...)
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  28.  12
    Declining Circumcision for My Premature Newborn.Dionne Deschenne - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):89-91.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Declining Circumcision for My Premature NewbornDionne DeschenneIn 1993, I was pregnant with my first of three sons and was busy preparing for his arrival. Unlike most parents, who focus much of their time on decorating the nursery and buying supplies, I was researching the medical decisions that I would need to make in the moments and weeks following his birth. Having worked in a hospital while a pre-medicine student, (...)
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  29.  24
    My Circumcision Decision: A Journey of Inquiry, Courage and Discovery.Laurie Evans - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):2-5.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:My Circumcision Decision:A Journey of Inquiry, Courage and DiscoveryLaurie EvansBefore becoming a mother, I was teaching parents to massage their babies and offering trainings for professionals. To promote my work, in 1984, I exhibited at the Whole Life Expo in New York City. When I returned to my booth after a break, I noticed someone had left a pamphlet by Edward Wallerstein, who wrote "Circumcision: An American Health Fallacy." (...)
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  30.  8
    My Personal Experience with Circumcision.Petrina Fadel - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):81-84.
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  31.  34
    What Do We Owe to Patients Who Leave Against Medical Advice? The Ethics of AMA Discharges.Leenoy Hendizadeh, Paula Goodman-Crews, Jeannette Martin & Eli Weber - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):139-145.
    Discharges against medical advice (AMA) make up a significant number of hospital discharges in the United States, and often involve vulnerable patients who struggle to obtain adequate medical care. Unfortunately, much of the AMA discharge process focuses on absolving the medical center of liability for what happens to these patients once they leave the acute setting. Comparatively little attention is paid to the ethical obligations of the medical team once an informed decision to leave the acute care setting AMA has (...)
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  32.  17
    Circumcision: Ordinary and Universal in My Community.Allan J. Jacobs - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):71-73.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Circumcision:Ordinary and Universal in My CommunityAllan J. JacobsMy1 circumcision experiences are remarkable mostly for their ordinariness. My wife Danaë gave birth to our son Perseus2 while I was a resident in obstetrics and gynecology in a city where we had no family. Perseus was circumcised in a Jewish brit milah3 ceremony on the eighth day of his life, as were my wife's and my male ancestors back into ancient (...)
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  33.  15
    Commentary on "Circumcision".Claudio J. Kogan - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):113-128.
    This commentary draws upon the author's experience in bioethics and as a physician, ordained Rabbi, and certified Mohel (a Jewish professional qualified to perform infant male circumcisions (MC)). People's identity and adherence to a religious belief are frequently cited reasons for deciding whether to circumcise their male children. For Jewish and Muslim males, circumcision is considered essential. In this commentary, the author uses his medical, religious, and bioethical knowledge, expertise, and experience to address common arguments used in opposing nontherapeutic male (...)
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  34.  8
    Mitzvah of the Bris.Thomas McDonald - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):77-79.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Mitzvah of the BrisThomas McDonaldHaving worked as a clinician in emergency medicine, internal medicine, and urgent care for a number of years, I've treated plenty of patients with skin infections. On a few rare occasions, some have casually mentioned that they were thinking about getting circumcised as adults to prevent reoccurring, frequent infections like Jock Itch. I think you're probably more likely to experience that kind of problem if (...)
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  35.  7
    Proudly Jewish—and Averse to Circumcision.Lisa Braver Moss - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):86-89.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Proudly Jewish—and Averse to CircumcisionLisa Braver MossI've always had a strong sense of my Jewish identity—and I've always had grave misgivings about circumcision. It used to seem that these [End Page 86] statements were at odds with one another. Now I'm on a mission to integrate the two.I'm married to a man who's also Jewish. In the late 1980s, we had two sons, whose circumcisions I agreed to. Brit (...)
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  36.  9
    Making Choices—Newborn Male Circumcision.Shawn D. O'Connor - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):107-111.
    Newborn male circumcision has potential benefits and advantages as well as disadvantages and risks. Families will at times have medical questions regarding newborn male circumcision that clinicians must be prepared to answer.
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  37.  11
    Surprised Divide.Anonymous One - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):70-71.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Surprised DivideAnonymous OneAnonymous OneNot long after our daughter was born, my wife and I were expecting a son. We were busy new parents, so her pregnancy with our second child went by quickly and without a lot of the fuss that a first pregnancy brings. To our surprise, our son was born a few weeks early but aside from a little jaundice he was a happy, healthy baby.My parents (...)
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  38.  8
    Circumcision and Regrets from the Mother of Three Sons.María Viola Sánchez - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):1-2.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Circumcision and Regrets from the Mother of Three SonsMaría Viola SánchezI am a psychologist and a radio talk show host for 25+ years. Both of my parents spoke English as their second language. I was raised by immigrants who demanded that "we speak English because we are Americans." I have four adult children, three sons, and a daughter.I gave birth to my children in the mid-80s. They are very (...)
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  39.  15
    A Brit Milah for Eliezer Herschel ben Yonatan Aryeh.Molly Sinderbrand - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):91-92.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:A Brit Milah for Eliezer Herschel ben Yonatan AryehMolly SinderbrandFor observant Jews, the choice to circumcise one's son is not a choice. Technically, it is a contractual obligation; the belief is that male circumcision is part of a holy covenant with God. The word for ritual circumcision, brit milah or bris, literally means "covenant [of circumcision]." Circumcision is a physical symbol of a relationship with the divine. It is (...)
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  40.  11
    When the Political Becomes Personal: Circumcision as a Cause and as a Parental Decision.J. Steven Svoboda - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):73-76.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:When the Political Becomes Personal:Circumcision as a Cause and as a Parental DecisionJ. Steven SvobodaAs I prepared for the arrival of my first child, a son, a central activity that I previously saw as political suddenly also became very personal. I had founded a non-profit organization in 1997 devoted to educating the world that genital cutting of a child, regardless of a child's gender, is unnecessary and harmful. This (...)
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  41.  8
    The Difficult Road to Deciding on Circumcision.Anonymous Two - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):84-85.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Difficult Road to Deciding on CircumcisionAnonymous TwoAnonymous TwoWhen I got my results back from my noninvasive prenatal testing, NIPT and found out I was going to have a little boy, one of my first thoughts was, "I don't want to circumcise him," which sounds silly because I just found out the gender of my baby and my first thought is about his genitalia. The idea of growing and (...)
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  42.  11
    Newborn Male Circumcision.Heidi A. Walsh - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):65-69.
    This symposium includes twelve personal narratives from parents about making the decision whether to circumcise their infant male children. The authors of the narratives include five fathers and seven mothers. Nine of the 12 parent authors opted to circumcise their infant sons, though the reasons they stated for doing so varied. Most of the parent authors relied on cultural or social beliefs, religious guidance, or a desire for sameness with the infant's father. Parents who didn't circumcise their male infants discuss (...)
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  43.  5
    To Cut or Not to Cut? That is the Question.Tracy Wilson - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (2):85-86.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:To Cut or Not to Cut?That is the QuestionTracy WilsonWhat is circumcision? In simple terms, it is the removal or excision of the foreskin of the penis. Seems so simple, right? In some families, it is that simple. In other families, it is a religious exercise. I am a doctorally-prepared Family Nurse Practitioner and started my nursing career in the NICU. I have seen my fair share of circumcisions. (...)
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  44.  9
    The Transformation: Power in Persistence and Perspective.Tyler Bendrick - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):7-10.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Transformation:Power in Persistence and PerspectiveTyler BendrickWe've got another meth napper," my resident stated. With an introduction like that, it is hard not to be immediately labeled as a "difficult patient." Being the only Spanish-speaking person on the team, I, a third-year medical student, became the primary point of contact for this severely injured patient. He was an only-Spanish-speaking, 36-year-old male admitted [End Page 7] to our trauma service (...)
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  45.  10
    You Can't Say "No" to That! (A "Difficult Patient" Story).Ingrid Berg - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):14-17.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:You Can't Say "No" to That!(A "Difficult Patient" Story)Ingrid BergAs a sequela of COVID-19, my rural Wisconsin hospital has been jam-packed for months with patients for whom we routinely provide care and many for whom we do not. An exodus of health care workers and other constraints have made the transfer of critically ill patients very difficult. In this disquieting "new-normal" of our work life, we routinely must call (...)
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  46.  9
    My Patient, Teacher.Marissa Blum - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):18-19.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:My Patient, TeacherMarissa BlumI remember meeting Beatriz about 12 years ago when security was called to her office visit room by the fellow doctor-in-training who was seeing her. She was yelling loudly about her pain medications, causing a terrific commotion. I stepped in to relieve the fellow and tried to calm her down and move the visit along without anyone getting hurt or further upset. And from then on, (...)
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  47.  11
    It's Not Always Just a Rash.Adam Bossert - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):24-26.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:It's Not Always Just a RashAdam BossertI looked at the emergency department track board and saw a patient waiting for a provider who was "roomed" in a hallway stretcher with a chief complaint of a rash. I briefly considered his ultimate disposition, "He's probably fine. He can't be that sick if he was triaged as safe for the hallway." I was tired and close to the end of an (...)
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  48.  14
    Undisclosed Placebo Trials in Clinical Practice: Undercover Beneficence or Unwarranted Deception?Daniel Edward Callies - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):51-58.
    Abstract:A placebo is an intervention that is believed to lack specific pharmacological or physiological efficacy for a patient's condition. While placebo-controlled trials are considered the gold standard when it comes to researching and testing new pharmacological treatments, the use of placebos in clinical practice is more controversial. The focus of this case study is an undisclosed placebo trial used as an attempt to diagnose a patient's complex and unusual symptomology. In this case, the placebo was used not just as a (...)
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  49.  11
    Positive Change in Perception and Care for a Difficult Patient.Melissa Cavanaugh - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):1-2.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Positive Change in Perception and Care for a Difficult PatientMelissa CavanaughIf you asked any healthcare professional if they had ever cared for a difficult patient, I am certain the answer would be a resounding "Yes!" I have encountered many over my forty-two years as an RN. The story of Ms. E. is one of exceptional challenge and, I hope, success.I met Ms. E. in 2012 when I took a (...)
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  50.  12
    Am I the Bad Guy?Tavishi Chopra - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):8-9.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Am I the Bad Guy?Tavishi ChopraWhat do you do when the 6-year-old patient you have vowed to protect suddenly deems you the bad guy?The afternoon started out like any typical afternoon during my inpatient pediatric rotation. We had finished rounding, grabbed lunch, and began to see our new admits. My residents told me to go see a 6-year-old, Ela, in the ED. All I knew was that she had (...)
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  51.  12
    Every Patient is a Teacher—Especially the "Difficult" Ones: Caring for Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder.Cara Connaughton - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):9-11.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Every Patient is a Teacher—Especially the "Difficult" Ones:Caring for Patients with Borderline Personality DisorderCara ConnaughtonNo one can teach you how to work with a patient living with borderline personality disorder quite like a patient living with borderline personality disorder (BPD). The lesson [End Page E9] isn't on how to be the perfect caregiver or how to meet all the patient's needs. The lesson is to notice that the quality (...)
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  52.  11
    It Is Going to Be a Long Clinic Day.Salvador Cruz-Flores - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):29-30.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:It Is Going to Be a Long Clinic DaySalvador Cruz-FloresIt was a routine neurology clinic day. I entered the room where one of the residents was seeing a patient that we will call Patty, a 32-year-old long-standing epilepsy patient. Patty was sitting in the chair with her husband by her side. She started screaming at me, complaining that she was tired of feeling sick and unable to do anything. (...)
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  53.  13
    Dying is Difficult.Clarice Douille - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):6-8.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Dying is DifficultClarice DouilleHayden had been a constant in my life since I was eight, as our families were close. He was a single dad who loved to talk and always had a smile on his face. He was obsessed with anything related to his kids and attended every school activity or sporting event.In 2015, Hayden was diagnosed with stage III colon cancer. He was adamant that he didn't (...)
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  54.  34
    The Right to Be Childfree.Andrea Eisenberg & Abram L. Brummett - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):59-64.
    Abstract:In this manuscript, we start with a real life account of an Ob/Gyn experience with a young patient from the childfree movement requesting permanent sterilization. A narrative ethics approach invites the reader to experience the encounter in an immersive way for this growing issue. This approach allows readers to reflect on their reaction to the patient and consider how that can affect other patient encounters. Additionally, it explores the stigma these young patients encounter making a permanent decision to never have (...)
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  55.  21
    Introduction: Providing Care When Patients Are "Difficult".Autumn Fiester - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):1-5.
    Abstract:This symposium includes twelve personal narratives from healthcare professionals who have worked with patients whose behavior, attitudes, or life situations make providing care challenging. At the lower end of the estimates, at least 15% of adult patient encounters are with patients described as "difficult" by the treating team, and these encounters often evoke feelings of dread, frustration, and anger in healthcare professionals. Verbal abuse of staff, repeat hospital admissions due to self-injurious behaviors, and negative beliefs about health may make providing (...)
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  56.  9
    Breaking the Readmission Cycle.Brian Hatten - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):22-24.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Breaking the Readmission CycleBrian HattenI want to share the story of my difficult patient Ms. L. She has twenty-seven current medical issues. Thirty-five active prescriptions. Limited mobility requiring the use of a motorized scooter. Non-medical care gaps. And over twenty hospital admissions since 2020. I met Ms. L approximately five years ago as her hospital attending and have continued to care for her during her frequent hospitalizations. I could (...)
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  57.  9
    When Is Enough, Enough?Megan Homsy - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):3-4.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:When Is Enough, Enough?Megan HomsyThis was a case that stuck with many members of our transplant team for a long time. The patient was a 44-year-old Caucasian male evaluated for a liver transplant with a diagnosis of hepatitis C virus (HCV), originally diagnosed 11 years before the transplant evaluation. The patient met the criteria for the following substance use diagnoses: alcohol use disorder moderate in sustained remission, in a (...)
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  58.  20
    The Tincture of the Doctor's Time.Holland Kaplan - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):12-14.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Tincture of the Doctor's TimeHolland KaplanI first thought of Mr. H as a "difficult patient" while reading the written hand-off I received on him as I was preparing to take over an inpatient general medicine service—"He leaves all the time to smoke." I don't think the statement was meant to imply anything about the patient; if anything, it may have been included for context to prepare me for (...)
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  59.  11
    'Difficult Patient': A Reflective Essay.Daniel McFarland - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):13-16.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:'Difficult Patient':A Reflective EssayDaniel McFarlandThe patient who sat across from me knew too much about all brain tumors. According to her, she would never know enough about the one sitting uncomfortably close to her brain's temporal lobe. In her quest for the 'right' answer to her meningioma problem, she became certain that its surgical removal would upend her life, leaving her in neurological taters.She was a small business owner (...)
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  60.  13
    Connecting through Chaos: Stories of Empathy and Trust.Aliza M. Narva & Erin T. Marturano - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):39-44.
    Abstract:Multidisciplinary healthcare workers describe interactions with "difficult" patients that have shaped their lives and their clinical practice. The narrators recall navigating the push-pull of empathy and frustration to forge therapeutic patient relationships in inhospitable, under-resourced environments. Their stories offer glimpses into the traumatized people hiding behind "difficult" patient facades. This commentary explores how the narrators engaged in empathy and obligation to build trusting relationships with patients. To protect themselves and their patients, healthcare workers must engage beyond individual clinical duties to (...)
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  61.  12
    I Had Never Heard Someone Use That Word Before.Adrienne Feller Novick - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):4-6.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:I Had Never Heard Someone Use That Word BeforeAdrienne Feller NovickThe patient was dying. As the social worker, I had arranged the meeting and sat shoulder to shoulder with the family and the attending physician in the small nondescript room. The family was grief-stricken and asked intelligent questions as they made difficult decisions about end-of-life care for their loved one. The doctor spoke with gentle kindness, acknowledging their difficult (...)
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  62.  9
    Vertical Transmission: The Patient, the Student, the Teacher.Miguel Paniagua - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):17-18.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Vertical Transmission:The Patient, the Student, the TeacherMiguel PaniaguaHe did not ask for this fate, nor did he deserve it, particularly considering the tragic circumstances. Lì presented to the campus health provider one month prior with fatigue, abdominal pain, and jaundice. He and his parents immigrated to the United States from China when he was a child. He was well aware that he had hepatitis B from what is termed (...)
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  63.  7
    Silent Screams; Lily's Story.Eva V. Regel - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):19-22.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Silent Screams; Lily's StoryEva V. Regel"Trauma is personal. It does not disappear if it is not validated. When it is ignored or invalidated, the silent screams continue internally heard only by the one held captive. When someone enters the pain and hears the scream, healing can begin."—Danielle Bernock, "Emerging Wings; A true story of Lies, Pain and the Love that Heals."Some patients stay with you long after they leave. (...)
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  64.  18
    I Know You Have to Stay … I Wish I Could, I Wish I Could.Megan K. Skaff - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):5-7.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:I Know You Have to Stay … I Wish I Could, I Wish I CouldMegan K. SkaffIn the world of healthcare, I advocate for the scores of youth who have had Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). I work to understand where the child has been so we can learn the extent of the trauma that the child has been through. While working for a facility as the Street Outreach Case (...)
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  65.  18
    An Epidemic of Difficult Patients.Keva Southwell - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):26-28.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:An Epidemic of Difficult PatientsKeva SouthwellAs the opioid epidemic marches on, we have all become familiar with a particular breed of "difficult patient," the intravenous drug user. Most teams try to get through these admissions with as few interactions as possible. Nurses will tell you how much they hate caring for these patients, often citing "they did this to themselves" as they experience prolonged admissions due to infections resulting (...)
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  66.  11
    Healthcare is Demanding: Patience is a Virtue!Andrea Torrence - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):11-13.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Healthcare is Demanding:Patience is a Virtue!Andrea TorrenceNursing is a rewarding career, but it can also be extremely challenging, depending on the type of patient you are assigned to. In my career, I have had a number of "difficult" patients, and every situation required a specific type of approach. Understanding how to interact with a difficult patient is a talent and requires a level of patience that exceeds the normal (...)
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  67.  9
    Working with Patience: An Insight into Dealing with Difficult Emotions.David Vilanova - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):10-12.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Working with Patience:An Insight into Dealing with Difficult EmotionsDavid VilanovaAs the most trusted professionals in the nation, nurses are expected to care for their patients with empathy and freedom from bias. The reality is that nurses are human, and some form of implicit bias is inevitable. In my own experience, this issue has reared its head on several occasions. My nursing background is prominently in cardiac and intensive care. (...)
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  68.  12
    Understanding the "Difficult" Patient.Yolonda Wilson - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (1):45-49.
    Abstract:James Groves opens his 1978 foundational article, "Taking Care of the Hateful Patient," thusly, "Admitted or not, the fact remains that a few patients kindle aversion, fear, despair, or even downright malice in their doctors." Groves understood his article as pulling back the curtain on an experience that physicians had but that few dared discuss without shame. His taxonomy of four types of "hateful" patients: clingers, entitled demanders, manipulative help rejectors, and self-destructive deniers may still be instructive. However, the intervening (...)
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