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  1.  4
    Bioethics of Public Commenting: Manipulation, Data Risk, and Public Participation in E‐Rulemaking.Jonathan Beever & Lakelyn E. Taylor - 2021 - Wiley: Bioethics 36 (1):18-24.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 1, Page 18-24, January 2022.
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  2.  7
    On the Morality of Vaccination Tourism.Juan Espindola & Moises Vaca - 2021 - Wiley: Bioethics 36 (1):93-99.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 1, Page 93-99, January 2022.
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  3.  11
    Invasive Experimental Brain Surgery for Dementia: Ethical Shifts in Clinical Research Practices?Frederic Gilbert, John Noel M. Viaña, Merlin Bittlinger, Ian Stevens, Maree Farrow, James Vickers, Susan Dodds & Judy Illes - 2021 - Wiley: Bioethics 36 (1):25-41.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 1, Page 25-41, January 2022.
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  4.  34
    Conscientious Objections, the Nature of Medicine, and the Need for Reformability.Eric J. Kim & Kyle Ferguson - 2021 - Wiley: Bioethics 36 (1):63-70.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 1, Page 63-70, January 2022.
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  5.  11
    A Defense of Conscientious Objection: Why Health is Integral to the Permissibility of Medical Refusals.Ryan Kulesa - 2021 - Wiley: Bioethics 36 (1):54-62.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 1, Page 54-62, January 2022.
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  6.  7
    Untangling Twinning. What Science Tells About the Nature of Human Embryos Maureen Condic Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press, 2020. 196 Pp. $45. ISBN: 9780268107055. [REVIEW]Jane Maienschein - 2021 - Wiley: Bioethics 36 (1):107-108.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 1, Page 107-108, January 2022.
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  7.  6
    Company‐Sponsored Egg Freezing: An Offer You Can't Refuse?Thomas Søbirk Petersen & Rune Hansen - 2021 - Wiley: Bioethics 36 (1):42-48.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 1, Page 42-48, January 2022.
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  8.  10
    Almost Over: Aging, Dying, Dead. Frances M. Kamm Oxford University Press: New York, 2020. 336 Pp. ISBN 9780190097158. US $29.95 (Hardback). [REVIEW]Ben Sarbey - 2021 - Wiley: Bioethics 36 (1):109-110.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 1, Page 109-110, January 2022.
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  9.  4
    Medical Assistance in Dying: Squabbles Over the Meaning of ‘Irremediable’.Udo Schuklenk - 2021 - Wiley: Bioethics 36 (1):1-2.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 1, Page 1-2, January 2022.
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  10.  56
    Kant and the Enhancement Debate: Imperfect Duties and Perfecting Ourselves.Brian A. Chance - 2021 - Wiley: Bioethics 35 (8):801-811.
    This essay develops a Kantian approach to the permissibility of biomedical physical, cognitive, and moral enhancement. Kant holds that human beings have an imperfect duty to promote their physical, cognitive, and moral perfection. While an agent’s individual circumstances may limit the means she may permissibly use to enhance herself, whether biomedically or otherwise, I argue (1) that biomedical means of enhancing oneself are, generally speaking, both permissible and meritorious from a Kantian perspective. Despite often being equally permissible, I also argue (...)
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  11.  2
    A Principled Approach to Cross‐Sector Genomic Data Access.Marcus Smith & Seumas Miller - 2021 - Wiley: Bioethics 35 (8):779-786.
    Bioethics, Volume 35, Issue 8, Page 779-786, October 2021.
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  12.  8
    The Fragility of Origin Essentialism: Where Mitochondrial ‘Replacement’ Meets the Non‐Identity Problem.Tim Lewens - 2021 - Wiley: Bioethics 35 (7).
    Bioethics, Volume 35, Issue 7, Page 615-622, September 2021.
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  13.  2
    Public Funding of Uterus Transplantation: Deepening the Socio‐Moral Critique.Mianna Lotz - 2021 - Wiley: Bioethics 35 (7).
    Bioethics, Volume 35, Issue 7, Page 664-671, September 2021.
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  14.  1
    Accuracy of Post‐Publication Financial Conflict of Interest Corrections in Medical Research: A Secondary Analysis of Pharmaceutical Company Payments to the Authors of the CREATE‐X Trial Report in the New England Journal of Medicine.Akihiko Ozaki, Hiroaki Saito, Toyoaki Sawano, Yuki Shimada & Tetsuya Tanimoto - 2021 - Wiley: Bioethics 35 (7).
    Bioethics, Volume 35, Issue 7, Page 704-713, September 2021.
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  15.  11
    A Trade‐Off: Antimicrobial Resistance and COVID‐19.Tess Johnson - 2021 - Wiley: Bioethics 1 (1):1-9.
    As we combat the COVID-19 pandemic, both the prescription of antimicrobials and the use of biocidal agents have increased in many countries. Although these measures can be expected to benefit existing people by, to some extent, mitigating the pandemic's effects, they may threaten long-term well-being of existing and future people, where they contribute to the problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). A trade-off dilemma thus presents itself: combat COVID-19 using these measures, or stop using them in order to protect against AMR. (...)
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  16.  5
    To Offer or Request? Disclosing Variants of Uncertain Significance in Prenatal Testing.Gabriel Watts & Ainsley J. Newson - 2021 - Wiley: Bioethics.
    The use of genomic testing in pregnancy is increasing, giving rise to questions over how the information that is generated should be offered and returned in clinical practice. While these tests provide important information for prenatal decision-making, they can also generate information of uncertain significance. This paper critically examines three models for approaching the disclosure of variants of uncertain significance (VUS), which can arise from forms of genomic testing such as prenatal chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA). Contrary to prevailing arguments, we (...)
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