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  1.  8
    What could come before time? Intertwining affectivity and temporality at the basis of intentionality.Juan Diego Bogotá - 2024 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2024:1-21.
    The enactive approach to cognition and the phenomenological tradition have in common a wide conception of ‘intentionality’. Within these frameworks, intentionality is understood as a general openness to the world. For classical phenomenologists, the most basic subjective structure that allows for such openness is time-consciousness. Some enactivists, while inspired by the phenomenological tradition, have nevertheless argued that affectivity is more basic, being that which gives rise to the temporal flow of consciousness. In this paper, I assess the relationship between temporality (...)
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  2.  49
    Proactive control and agency.René Baston - 2024 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 23 (1):43-61.
    Can agents overcome unconscious psychological influences without being aware of them? Some philosophers and psychologists assume that agents need to be aware of psychological influences to successfully control behavior. The aim of this text is to argue that when agents engage in a proactive control strategy, they can successfully shield their behavior from some unconscious influences. If agents actively check for conflicts between their actions and mental states, they engage in reactive control. For engaging in reactive control, agents need awareness (...)
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  3.  58
    Understanding Sophia? On human interaction with artificial agents.Thomas Fuchs - 2024 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 23 (1):21-42.
    Advances in artificial intelligence (AI) create an increasing similarity between the performance of AI systems or AI-based robots and human communication. They raise the questions: whether it is possible to communicate with, understand, and even empathically perceive artificial agents; whether we should ascribe actual subjectivity and thus quasi-personal status to them beyond a certain level of simulation; what will be the impact of an increasing dissolution of the distinction between simulated and real encounters. (1) To answer these questions, the paper (...)
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  4.  38
    Imagination, Mental Representation, and Moral Agency: Moral Pointers in Kierkegaard and Ricoeur.Wojciech Kaftanski - 2024 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 23 (1):179-198.
    This article engages the considerations of imagination in Kierkegaard and Ricoeur to argue for a moral dimension of the imagination and its objects. Imaginary objects are taken to be mental representations in images and narratives of people or courses of action that are not real in the sense that they are not actual, or have not yet happened. Three claims are made in the article. First, by drawing on the category of possibility, a conceptual distinction is established between imagination and (...)
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  5. Shared action: An existential phenomenological account.Nicolai Knudsen - 2024 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 23 (1):63-83.
    Drawing on recent phenomenological discussions of collective intentionality and existential phenomenological accounts of agency, this article proposes a novel interpretation of shared action. First, I argue that we should understand action on the basis of how an environment pre-reflectively solicits agents to behave based on (a) the affordances or goals inflected by their abilities and dispositions and (b) their self-referential commitment to a project that is furthered by these affordances. Second, I show that this definition of action is sufficiently flexible (...)
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  6.  51
    On the psychologism of neurophenomenology.Jesse Lopes - 2024 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 23 (1):85-104.
    Psychologism is defined as “the doctrine that the laws of mathematics and logic can be reduced to or depend on the laws governing thinking” (Moran & Cohen, 2012 266). And for Husserl, the laws of logic include the laws of meaning: “logic evidently is the science of meanings as such [Wissenschaft von Bedeutungen als solchen]” (Husserl ( 1975 ) 98/2001 225). I argue that, since it is sufficient for a theory to be psychologistic if the empiricistic theory of abstraction is (...)
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  7.  30
    Meta-awareness, mind wandering and negative mood in the context of the continuity hypothesis of dreaming.Reza Maleeh & Shaghayegh Konjedi - 2024 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 23 (1):105-131.
    In the waking state, in the absence of meta-awareness, mind wandering with specific contents can lead to negative mood. Such negative mood can be incorporated into dreaming according to the continuity hypothesis of dreaming. In this paper we argue that in the presence of what we call ‘sustained phenomenal meta-awareness’, negative mood would not follow mind wandering in waking. Sustained phenomenal meta-awareness has a non-sensory, non-affective phenomenal character. It is essentially intransitive, prereflectively self-aware, non-propositional, non-conceptual and devoid of subject-object structure. (...)
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  8.  10
    Review of Michelle Maiese and Robert Hanna, The Mind–Body Politic, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019. [REVIEW]Josephine Pascoe - 2024 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 23 (1):217-222.
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  9.  6
    Review of Rudolf Bernet, Force, Drive, Desire. A Philosophy of Psychoanalysis. Trans. by Sahar Allen, Northwestern University Press, 2020. [REVIEW]Jan Puc - 2024 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 23 (1):207-215.
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  10.  23
    Socio-cultural norms in ecological psychology: The education of intention.Miguel Segundo-Ortin - 2024 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 23 (1):1-19.
    Although it is a common claim in the ecological psychology literature that our perception of the environment’s affordances is influenced by socio-cultural norms, an explanation of how this is possible remains to be offered. In this paper, I outline an account of this phenomenon by focusing on the ecological theory of perceptual learning. Two main theses are defended. First, I argue that to account for how socio-cultural norms can influence perception, we must pay attention not only to the education of (...)
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  11.  5
    Review of Nancy J. Holland, Heidegger and the problem of consciousness, Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2018. [REVIEW]Philip Sutherland - 2024 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 23 (1):199-205.
  12.  4
    Review of Christian Tewes and Giovanni Stanghellini (eds.), Time and Body. Phenomenological and psychopathological approaches, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2021. [REVIEW]Alexander Nicolai Wendt - 2024 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 23 (1):223-230.
    Christian Tewes and Giovanni Stanghellini deliver a collective volume, dedicated to the honours of Thomas Fuchs. The contributors mainly belong to the phenomenological movement and provide different perspectives on the subject matter of psychopathology. Several common references, such as Fuchs, Parnas, and Sass, as well as motives, such as the experience of time or narrative self-consciousness, give the collection a unitary outline. The volume is well-edited and offers an adequate representation of the state of the art in phenomenological psychopathology thanks (...)
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  13.  13
    Writing as an extended cognitive system.Karenleigh A. Overmann - 2024 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-21.
    This paper presents writing as an extended cognitive system comprised of brain, body, and the material form that is writing. Part I introduces the theoretical framework used for the analysis, Material Engagement Theory (MET), and the initial insights into writing systems gained by applying MET to Mesopotamian artifacts for numbers and writing. Part II discusses how writing as a material form has changed over time and why this material change reflects, accumulates, and distributes change in the behaviors and brains of (...)
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