Year:

  1.  4
    Ralph Cudworth’s Divine Conceptualism and the Bootstrapping Objection.Zachary Adam Akin - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (2):367-376.
    In this paper, I defend divine conceptualism against one prominent critique from William Lane Craig in his book God and Abstract Objects. Craig argues that the divine conceptualist’s only way out of the “bootstrapping objection” results in an unpalatable concession of defeat to the metaphysical anti-realist. Craig’s argument depends on an analysis whereby God is causally or logically prior to the divine concepts. As such, the conceptualist may resist it by adopting—following Ralph Cudworth—a version of divine conceptualism which does not (...)
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  2.  3
    Rediscovering the Aesthetic Argument.Jonathan Ashbach - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (2):291-312.
    The aesthetic argument for the existence of God is sometimes seen as a weaker younger cousin to the more powerful moral argument, but it may in fact be the more formidable of the two. The phenomenological aesthetic argument, presented here, brackets the question of beauty’s objectivity. It argues that various aspects of the raw data of the human aesthetic sense—specifically, our perceptions of human, natural, artistic, and abstract beauty—are highly unlikely to have developed on naturalism but are unsurprising given theism. (...)
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  3.  5
    Catching Hold of Christ’s Humility.Joshua Blander - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (2):377-389.
    The increased attention paid to the virtue of humility in recent years has revealed much interest in severing humility from its theological roots and commitments. In their recent books, Kent Dunnington and Michael Austin offer distinctively Christian approaches to, and accounts of, humility. Dunnington offers a strongly Augustinian proposal which focuses on recognizing our complete dependence on God, while Austin argues for a Christological account, rooted in the New Testament, that emphasizes other-directedness. Despite important differences between their projects, their Christian (...)
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  4.  3
    Nathan L. King, The Excellent Mind: Intellectual Virtues for Everyday Life.Chad Bogosian - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (2):396-399.
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  5.  29
    Must God Create the Best Available Creatures?Mark J. Boone - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (2):271-289.
    J. L. Mackie distinguished himself in twentieth-century philosophy by presenting an important objection to the traditional free will explanation for why God would allow evil: If evil is due to the free choice of creatures, why wouldn’t an omnipotent God simply create free creatures who would choose better? Alvin Plantinga, in turn, distinguished himself with his critique of Mackie. Plantinga’s main point is that Mackie made a mistake in assuming that it is within the power of omnipotence fully to create (...)
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  6.  19
    God, Time, and Creation.William Lane Craig - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (2):359-365.
    R. T. Mullins has questioned the tenability of a model of divine eternity according to which God exists timelessly sans creation and temporally since the moment of creation. His puzzlement about the model can be largely resolved by recognizing that two different understandings of causation may be applied to the origin of the universe, a medieval understanding of efficient causation by a causal agent and a modern understanding of causation as a relation between two events. Mullins’s more fundamental reservations about (...)
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  7.  5
    Harold J. Netland, Religious Experience and the Knowledge of God: The Evidential Force of Divine Encounters.Travis Dickinson - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (2):403-406.
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  8.  1
    Jordan Wessling, Love Divine: A Systematic Account of God’s Love for Humanity.Keith Hess - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (2):393-396.
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  9. Oliver D. Crisp, James M. Arcadi, and Jordan Wessling, The Nature and Promise of Analytic Theology.Andrew Hollingsworth - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (2):399-402.
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  10.  9
    Craig Carter on Creatio Ex Nihilo and Classical Theism.Andrew Hollingsworth & Jordan L. Steffaniak - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (2):249-269.
    In several recent publications, Craig A. Carter argues that classical theism is the only model of God that can consistently affirm the Christian doctrine of creatio ex nihilo. He claims that because competing models of God deny true transcendence of God they cannot affirm creatio ex nihilo. We argue that Carter’s claim is false and that his argument is both unclear and fallacious. We further argue that creatio ex nihilo is consistent with other models of God, and we argue this (...)
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  11.  32
    If Homosexuality Is Wrong, So Is Contraception.Timothy Hsiao - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (2):341-355.
    Historically, the Christian church was united in firm opposition to both homosexuality and contraception. Today most evangelical Christians continue to oppose the former but have embraced the latter. This paper argues that there is a clear tension between these views, especially when it comes to the evangelical use of natural law–type reasoning. The conclusion of this paper is that Christians who view homosexual activity as immoral must also view artificial contraception in the same light. They are wrong for the same (...)
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  12.  2
    Editor’s Introduction.Ross D. Inman - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (2):245-245.
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  13.  1
    On Whether There Are Grounds for Worship.Kirk Lougheed - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (2):313-327.
    I explore a novel defense of the duty to worship God based on the idea that it is what’s best for us. I argue that this should be understood as the claim that humans are required to do what’s best when there is a best option available; the best option is identifiable; and the best option is feasible. One virtue of this account is that it can explain how a duty to worship God is defeasible. I show this by appealing (...)
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  14.  14
    Craig’s God Cannot Create a Temporal Universe.Erik J. Wielenberg - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (2):329-340.
    William Lane Craig’s inuential kalam cosmological argument concludes that the universe has a cause of its beginning. Craig provides some supplementary reasoning to suggest that the first cause is God—a God that exists timelessly without the universe and temporally with the universe. I argue that Craig’s hypothesis about the nature of the first cause is impossible. In particular, it cannot be the case that God timelessly wills to create the universe and the universe begins to exist.
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  15.  10
    On William Rowe’s Evidential Arguments From Evil.Leo K. C. Cheung - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):125-140.
    William Rowe has put forward four popular evidential arguments from evil. I argue that there was already a prominent distinction between logical and evidential arguments from evil—the IN-IM-distinction, and that its adoption leads to two important results. First, all three non-Bayesian evidential arguments are actually not evidential but logical, while the Bayesian evidential argument genuinely evidential. Second, and most importantly, Rowe’s Bayesian evidential argument is redundant, in the sense that it has the same diculties his three non-Bayesian arguments have. His (...)
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  16.  5
    Or Abstractum.Steven B. Cowan - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):175-185.
    George Berkeley is famous for the metaphysical principle esse is percipi or percipere. Many Berkeleyan idealists take this principle to be incompatible with Platonic realism about abstract objects, and thus opt either for nominalism or divine conceptualism on which they are construed as divine ideas. In this paper, I argue that Berkeleyan idealism is consistent with a Platonic realism in which abstracta exist outside the divine mind. This allows the Berkeleyan to expand Berkeley’s principle to read: esse is percipi or (...)
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  17.  56
    On Systematic Philosophical Theology.William Lane Craig - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):11-25.
    The disciplines of systematic theology, dogmatic theology, fundamental theology, philosophical theology, and philosophy of religion are characterized and their relations to one another are discussed.
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  18.  7
    Response to My Interlocutors.Oliver D. Crisp - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):63-74.
    In this essay I respond to my interlocutors in the symposium on my monograph, Analyzing Doctrine. Addressing each of them in the order in which their essays are printed, I consider and reply to comments by William Lane Craig, Steven Nemes, N. Gray Sutanto, Jordan Wessling and Joanna Leidenhag.
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  19.  19
    Platonism About Abstracta.Travis Dumsday - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):141-158.
    I present a new argument to the effect that platonism about abstract entities undermines metaphysical naturalism and provides some support to theism. I further suggest that there are ways of extending this line of reasoning to point toward one or another more specific varieties of Christian theism.
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  20.  7
    The Need for Thisnesses.William Hasker - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):159-171.
    Richard Swinburne is an emergent dualist. One feature of his view is the need for a “thisness” or haecceity that makes each soul the soul that it is, distinct from other souls that may be indistinguishable from it in all qualitative respects. I argue that there is no need for thisnesses.
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  21.  6
    Personal Identity and Applied Ethics: A Historical and Philosophical Introduction, Andrea Sauchelli. [REVIEW]Keith Hess - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):222-226.
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  22.  2
    Physicalism and the Incarnation.Keith Hess - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):195-199.
    Trenton Merricks holds to a physicalist view of the Incarnation according to which the Son transformed into a physical object at the Incarnation. R. T. Mullins, in “Physicalist Christology and the Two Sons Worry,” claims that Merricks’s account is Nestorian since it entails that it is metaphysically possible for the human nature of Christ to be a person independently of the Son’s incarnation. While I am not a physicalist, in this essay I defend Merricks’s view against Mullins’s claim. I argue (...)
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  23.  3
    Editor’s Introduction.Ross D. Inman - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):3-3.
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  24.  5
    Aquinas, Original Sin, and the Challenge of Evolution, Daniel W. Houck.Wilson Jeremiah - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):218-222.
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  25.  4
    Pneumatology, Participation, and Load-Bearing Structures.Joanna Leidenhag - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):53-62.
    As Oliver D. Crisp’s Analyzing Doctrine sets out the major moves of a future analytic systematic theology, this response worries about the lack of close attention to work of the Holy Spirit. It is argued that this generates an unhelpful tendency for key theological concepts to collapse into one another. First, the concepts of theosis, participation, union, conformity, and sanctification appear indistinguishable. Second, Crisp portrays monofocal attention to the union of incarnation, without equal concern for that additional complementary way that (...)
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  26. Houston, Do We Have a Problem?C. A. McIntosh & Tyler Dalton McNabb - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):101-124.
    Would the existence of extraterrestrial intelligent life conflict in any way with Christian belief? We identify six areas of potential conflict. If there be no conflict in any of these areas—and we argue ultimately there is not—we are confident in declaring that there is no conflict, period. This conclusion underwrites the integrity of theological explorations into the existence of ETI, which has become a topic of increasing interest among theologians in recent years.
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  27.  2
    The Epistemic Advantage of Lost Autographic Tokens of the Bible.J. P. Moreland - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):187-193.
    I address an epistemic and related ontological dificulty with the doctrine of biblical inerrancy. The ontological problem: If biblical inerrancy applies to the original autographs, why would God allow these to disappear from the scene? The epistemological problem: Given that the original autographs are gone, we lack a way to know exactly what the original writings were. The first problem is solved by distinguishing text types and tokens, and claiming that semantic meaning and inerrancy are underivative features types. The second (...)
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  28.  7
    Explaining Evil: Four Views, W. Paul Franks, Ed.Wes Morriston - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):213-218.
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  29.  4
    Physicalism and the Incarnation Once More.R. T. Mullins - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):201-209.
    In a previous publication, I offered a novel argument against physicalist approaches to the Incarnation called “the Two Sons Worry.” In brief, I argued that a physicalist who is committed to the ecumenical teachings about the Incarnation cannot easily escape the worry that there are two persons in Jesus Christ. Keith Hess has recently pointed out a flaw in the argument that I present. In this paper, I offer a reply that fixes the argument, thus leaving the problem for the (...)
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  30.  13
    God Is Not Chastened.Steven Nemes - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):27-35.
    Oliver Crisp proposes “chastened theism” as a theologically realist alternative to classical theism and theistic personalism. I critique his chastened theism and propose the alternative of Christian Pure Act theism, a “chastened” version of theological nonrealism.
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  31.  3
    Genuine Logical Consequence.Walter J. Schultz - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):77-100.
    Our pretheoretic sense of the relation of logical consequence arises from our experience of deductive inference. By ignoring the priority of inference and failing to provide an account of the ontological grounds of the conceptual experience and of the modal and truth elements in the statement of our pretheoretical sense, informal and technical accounts are at best partial. This paper proposes an ontological analysis of both elements which accounts for our conceptual experience and differentiates genuine from ersatz logical consequence.
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  32.  10
    On Maximal Simplicity.N. Gray Sutanto - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):37-42.
    This essay engages with Oliver D. Crisp’s parsimonious model of divine simplicity while offering a defense of a maximal account of simplicity. Specifically, I clarify the way in with Reformed orthodox theologians, like Gisbertus Voetius, anticipate something like Crisp’s model, that pure actuality is an explication, rather than an entailment, of the doctrine of simplicity, and that the doctrine of simplicity remains consistent with epistemic modesty in relation to theological matters.
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  33.  4
    Crisp on Conciliar Authority.Jordan Wessling - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):43-52.
    In Analyzing Doctrine: Toward a Systematic eology, Oliver Crisp infers from a general principle concerning God’s providential care for the church that it is implausible that God would allow substantial error on the central theological promulgations of an ecumenical council. is conclusion is then used specifically against contemporary neo-monothelites, who consciously contravene the dyothelite teachings of the third Council of Constantinople. In this paper, I raise several doubts about the inference utilized by Crisp against these neo-monothelites, and I seek to (...)
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  34.  1
    Analyzing Doctrine: A Précis.Christopher Woznicki - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):7-10.
    In this précis I introduce the topic of the symposium, namely, Oliver D. Crisp’s book, Analyzing Doctrine: Toward a Systematic Theology. I discuss the impetus behind the symposium, provide a précis of Analyzing Doctrine, and preview the various responses to the book given by his interlocutors. I conclude by highlighting some possible new directions for analytic theology.
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