Philosophical Investigations

ISSNs: 0190-0536, 1467-9205

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  1.  1
    The strange thing of which we find ourselves a part: Theodore Dreiser's virus novel.Curtis Brown - 2024 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (3):311-341.
    An American teacher of literature and poetry living in Montréal, Curtis Brown, recovers Theodore Dreiser's An American Tragedy (1925) as a ‘virus novel’, venturing an integrated response to two literary questions occasioned by the recent pandemic: What might the contemporary ‘Covid novel’ look like? And how did the Spanish flu of 1918–1919—which infected a third of the world's population and killed 50 million—leave literary traces so few and faint? Brown tracks the genesis of An American Tragedy in Dreiser's personal life, (...)
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  2.  1
    The subject of literature, the subject of philosophy: Plato, Wittgenstein, and Kierkegaard's reading of Abraham.Kenneth Dauber - 2024 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (3):298-310.
    Though Plato, famously, had Socrates ban the poets from his republic while Wittgenstein seems to aspire to a style of philosophical writing that approaches the literary, there is a troubling similarity between them in their elision of the self as a self. Saying what he means in the mode of the philosopher or meaning what he says in the mode of the poet, how can the self both be and say itself? The misprision of Abraham's binding of Isaac in the (...)
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  3. Introduction.K. L. Evans - 2024 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (3):275-277.
    Philosophical Investigations, EarlyView.
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  4.  3
    The disappearance of Allan Bloom.K. L. Evans - 2024 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (3):342-381.
    In humanities departments across the country Allan Bloom is condemned and reviled—but for what misconduct? The present investigation into our distorted view of Bloom begins by reframing his transgressions. Bloom has offended eminent philosophy professors by boosting students' desire for a philosophic education. He has emboldened promising young people by teaching them to bear up under the deforming forces of convention and corruption and edge their way towards the question, ‘How should I live my life?’ A philosophic education as Bloom (...)
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  5.  6
    The Plague: Modern life.Gene Fendt - 2024 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (3):396-410.
    The social structures and thought patterns of the modern world are the fruits of the Enlightenment, which begins by eliminating final causal explanations in favour of purely material and efficient causes. The development and great technical success of Enlightenment procedures has, however, produced a cultural blindness about the good. Camus's novel shows us this cultural blindness through characters who themselves suffer from it; for modern man, it is almost a natural evil—we are born into it. Camus' hope must have been (...)
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  6.  3
    The death of the embodied philosopher and the life of the mind: On the literary and poetic features of Plato's Phaedo.Rick Anthony Furtak - 2024 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (3):382-395.
    Socrates is a man of faith whose love and pursuit of the truth is grounded in religious conviction. Faith, whatever else it may be, involves guiding one's life in terms of a transcendent dimension, recognizing a reality lying behind any particular experience. In Plato's Phaedo, a literary and philosophical masterpiece, we enter the narrative of Socrates' trial and execution on the day of his death, examining arguments for the immortality of the psyche. The dialogue combines logical argument and mythological speculation, (...)
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  7.  2
    ‘It's all there in the language’—a conversation with Garrett Stewart.David LaRocca - 2024 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (3):278-297.
    What does a famed literary theorist have to say about the interaction between ‘literature’ and ‘philosophy’? Well, if he's Garrett Stewart, the celebrated agent of pyrotechnic style in the service of durable insights across disparate disciplines and media, then we have much reason to lean in and listen. Stewart is the author of 20 books that range with uncanny competency across Victorian narrative, contemporary American fiction, written auralities, poetics and prose stylistics, cinematic evolution from silver oxide to screen pixel, book (...)
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  8.  5
    ‘A better sort of reader’: Wittgenstein on literary reading.David Rozema - 2024 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (3):411-429.
    F. R. Leavis, the leading literary critic at Cambridge from 1930 to 1960, recounts the time when his friend Ludwig Wittgenstein told him to ‘give up literary criticism!’ The remark came as a surprise to Leavis, and it remains somewhat puzzling to anyone who reads of the encounter, for there are few contextual clues as to why Wittgenstein would say such a thing. But there are clues in Wittgenstein's many remarks on literature, music and other art forms scattered throughout his (...)
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  9.  2
    Conclusion.David Rozema - 2024 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (3):430-431.
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  10.  41
    ‘On the necessity of identity and Tarski's T‐schema’—A response to Davood Hosseini.Alex Blum - 2024 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (2):270-271.
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  11.  24
    On Wittgenstein's remarks about the standard metre.Kai Michael Büttner - 2024 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (2):204-222.
    In a notorious passage from his Philosophical Investigations, Wittgenstein writes that one can state of the standard metre neither that it is one metre long, nor that it is not one metre long. While many commentators have rejected this claim, it has been commonly assumed that Wittgenstein himself endorsed it. In a recently published article, Thomas Müller not only provides a novel argument against Wittgenstein's claim about the standard metre but also claims that Wittgenstein did not actually endorse that claim. (...)
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  12.  26
    On having control over our actions.Doug Hardman - 2024 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (2):165-177.
    In this essay, I investigate the longstanding philosophical problem of whether we have control over our actions in a deterministic world. In working through a range of everyday situations in which this problem could arise, I come to the realisation that determinism has no bearing on whether we have control over our actions, because having control over our actions and determinism only make sense under different aspects.
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  13.  43
    Tarski's T‐schema and necessity of identity.Davood Hosseini - 2024 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (2):268-269.
    Blum (Philosophical Investigations 46, 2023, 264) argues that Tarski's T‐schema and the thesis of the necessity of identity are mutually inconsistent. It is argued that his argument fails.
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  14.  24
    Hadot's later Wittgenstein: A critique.Michael Hymers - 2024 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (2):178-203.
    Pierre Hadot is best known as a historian of ancient philosophy and for advocating the relevance of ancient thinking for contemporary lives. What is less well known is that he was one of the first French philosophers to take a serious interest in the work of Wittgenstein, publishing between 1959 and 1962 two essays on the Tractatus and two on the Philosophical Investigations, since republished as Wittgenstein et les limites de langage (Paris: J. Vrin, 2010). Only two of these essays (...)
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  15.  19
    Hertz's legacy in Tractarian metaphysics 1.Martin Schmidt - 2024 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (2):223-242.
    The influence of Heinrich Hertz's The Principles of Mechanics on Ludwig Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico‐Philosophicus has been studied for decades, but it has never become a mainstream topic in the Wittgensteinian literature. This paper focusses on Tractarian notions of objects, elementary facts and elementary sentences and discusses their similarities with Hertz's concepts of mass, its constituents and their mechanistic images. As the paper demonstrates, the Hertzian context provides some fruitful interpretational leads concerning several controversial ideas endorsed by early Wittgenstein, namely propositional (...)
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  16.  34
    Reply to Sullivan: Idealism and limits.Oliver Thomas Spinney - 2024 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (2):243-257.
    In this discussion I argue that Peter Sullivan is wrong to suggest that Wittgenstein's position in the Philosophical Investigations involves a commitment to transcendental idealism. I show that Sullivan's interpretation involves holding that transcendental idealism was employed by Wittgenstein in the attempt to combat a Platonist mythology. I show, through a detailed appraisal of Wittgenstein's discussion of samples, that Wittgenstein's approach to Platonism does not involve any such employment of transcendental idealism. I conclude that there is no such motivation as (...)
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  17.  10
    A Response to Dehnel's ‘Defending Wittgenstein’.Samuel J. Wheeler - 2024 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (2):258-267.
    This is a reply to ‘Defending Wittgenstein’, Piotr Dehnel's critique of my article, ‘Defending Wittgenstein's Remarks on Cantor from Putnam’. I first show that my position is much more in agreement with Felix Mühlhölzer than Dehnel takes it to be, and that his criticism of me is nothing more than a failure to recognize this. I then show how Dehnel incorrectly reads Wittgenstein as rejecting set theory as false. It is an overemphasis on and a much too narrow picture of (...)
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  18.  96
    Cora Diamond on the Concept of Ethics.Barnaby Burleigh - 2024 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (1):101-118.
    Is ethics about anything? Cora Diamond has famously argued that ethics lacks a subject matter by providing a variety of examples of ethical discourse, which, she claims, are ethically significant without being about anything ethical. They do not have a moral subject matter, but are nonetheless instances of moral thinking. This raises the question what it means for a piece of discourse to be moral. What does Diamond mean by the concept of ethics? Diamond never gives this question a direct (...)
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