View year:

  1. Du Bois, Marx, and the Jewish Question Reconsidered.Asaf Angermann - 2024 - Critical Philosophy of Race 12 (1):51-82.
    ABSTRACT W. E. B. Du Bois’s groundbreaking scholarship on race and racial prejudice was inseparable from his lifelong struggle for racial justice, Black liberation, and against social and political oppression. Both in his theoretical and in his historical-political work, Du Bois substantially and critically engaged with the “Jewish question”: with Jewish life, history, and politics, with the experiential perspective of an oppressed minority, and with the fight against prejudice and racial hatred. Throughout in life, and in particular in later years, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  5
    “L’Européen Sait et ne sait pas”: Frantz Fanon and Epistemologies of Ignorance.Magali Bessone - 2024 - Critical Philosophy of Race 12 (1):83-105.
    ABSTRACT This article argues that Frantz Fanon’s critique of the epistemology of the colonial situation is a complex, pluralized, epistemology of ignorance, where ignorance takes three main forms. Fanon first produces a critique of colonial ideology, in which ignorance is the product of the colonizers’ false justificatory ideology. Fanon unveils how Europeans, through human sciences such as “ethnopsychiatry” and “ethnophilosophy,” deliberately produce ignorance and devaluation of colonized subjects and colonized knowledge for purposes of domination. Second, ignorance is the unintentional result (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  8
    An Irrealist Theory of Race.Jonardon Ganeri - 2024 - Critical Philosophy of Race 12 (1):106-125.
    ABSTRACT In this article I draw upon an analogy between a debate in the critical philosophy of race over the metaphysics of race and a debate in Buddhist philosophy of mind over the metaphysics of selves. I argue that there is a defensible irrealist theory of race, corresponding to the performativist theory of self found in certain Buddhist thinkers.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  6
    Fatal Longings: Nostalgia, Slavery, and Medicine.Jesús Luzardo - 2024 - Critical Philosophy of Race 12 (1):182-209.
    ABSTRACT This article analyzes the politics of nostalgia’s history as a fatal disease between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries, especially as it was applied to slaves in late eighteenth-century Cuba. I trace nostalgia’s medical history beginning with its inauguration in Swiss medicine in 1688, and then describe the contours of its transformation into a military disease primarily affecting white soldiers in France and the United States. Finally, I translate and analyze key elements of Francisco Barrera y Domingo’s work on nostalgia (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  5
    On Necropolitics: Achille Mbembe and the Critique of Black Reason.Eduardo Mendieta - 2024 - Critical Philosophy of Race 12 (1):1-2.
    ABSTRACT This is a brief introduction to a special section on the work of Achille Mbembe.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Her Mother’s Tongue: Bilingual Dwelling, Being In-Between, and the Intergenerational Co-creation of Language-Worlds.Helen Ngo - 2024 - Critical Philosophy of Race 12 (1):145-181.
    This article takes up the idea of language as a home and dwelling, and reconsiders what this might mean in the context of diasporic bilingualism – where as a ‘heritage speaker’ of a minority language, the ‘mother tongue’ may be experienced as both deeply familiar yet also alien or alienating. Drawing on a range of philosophical and literary accounts (Cassin, Arendt, Anzaldúa, Vuong, among others), this article explores how the so-called ‘mother tongue’ is experienced by heritage speakers in an English-dominant (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  5
    “This Land of Thorns Is Not Habitable”: Diagnosing the Despair of Racialized Meta-oppression.Jacqueline Renée Scott - 2024 - Critical Philosophy of Race 12 (1):126-144.
    ABSTRACT This article addresses the growing literature in critical race studies, which holds that racism is permanent or incurable, and that by adopting this pessimistic view of racism, we can enact improved and healthier racialized lives. I argue that the focus on curing anti-Black racism, and the failure to do so in the civil rights era and its aftermath has left people of all races, to varying degrees, stuck in pessimistic states of racialized anger, resentment, guilt, and shame. These pessimistic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  2
    Living Plots in the Stone-Time of Necropolitics.Kris F. Sealey - 2024 - Critical Philosophy of Race 12 (1):3-23.
    ABSTRACT Necropolitical arrangements of bifurcations delineate those ontological antagonisms that code Blackness as ontological lack (as non-position). In this article, I attempt to think about this evacuation of being in terms of the necropolitical’s fleshy excess, as what Alexander Weheliye’s work names “habeus viscus.” In so doing, I explore the implications, for our understanding of the “repressed proximities” of which the necropolitical consists, of arrangements that always-already include entanglements with their fleshy excess. In other words, if the nonposition of the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  5
    Necropolitics, Border Walls, and a Murder of Jim and Juan Crows in the Americas.Melissa W. Wright - 2024 - Critical Philosophy of Race 12 (1):24-50.
    ABSTRACT Across the Mexico-United States borderlands, overlapping white supremacist and Anglo-nationalist movements are building private walls as monuments to Donald Trump. Numerous social justice activists and ecological stewards have warned that these Trumpist border walls present specific and new threats to social and ecological landscapes, particularly along the riparian sections of the borderlands. To slow their building and even topple these walls, justice activists and ecological caretakers are working to fortify networks with similar efforts elsewhere. In an effort to provide (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues